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2015


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easyGWAS: An Integrated Computational Framework for Advanced Genome-Wide Association Studies

Grimm, Dominik

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, November 2015 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

2015


[BibTex]


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Causal Discovery Beyond Conditional Independences

Sgouritsa, E.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, October 2015 (phdthesis)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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From Points to Probability Measures: A Statistical Learning on Distributions with Kernel Mean Embedding

Muandet, K.

University of Tübingen, Germany, University of Tübingen, Germany, September 2015 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Machine Learning Approaches to Image Deconvolution

Schuler, C.

University of Tübingen, Germany, University of Tübingen, Germany, September 2015 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Blind Retrospective Motion Correction of MR Images

Loktyushin, A.

University of Tübingen, Germany, May 2015 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Shape Models of the Human Body for Distributed Inference
Shape Models of the Human Body for Distributed Inference

Zuffi, S.

Brown University, May 2015 (phdthesis)

Abstract
In this thesis we address the problem of building shape models of the human body, in 2D and 3D, which are realistic and efficient to use. We focus our efforts on the human body, which is highly articulated and has interesting shape variations, but the approaches we present here can be applied to generic deformable and articulated objects. To address efficiency, we constrain our models to be part-based and have a tree-structured representation with pairwise relationships between connected parts. This allows the application of methods for distributed inference based on message passing. To address realism, we exploit recent advances in computer graphics that represent the human body with statistical shape models learned from 3D scans. We introduce two articulated body models, a 2D model, named Deformable Structures (DS), which is a contour-based model parameterized for 2D pose and projected shape, and a 3D model, named Stitchable Puppet (SP), which is a mesh-based model parameterized for 3D pose, pose-dependent deformations and intrinsic body shape. We have successfully applied the models to interesting and challenging problems in computer vision and computer graphics, namely pose estimation from static images, pose estimation from video sequences, pose and shape estimation from 3D scan data. This advances the state of the art in human pose and shape estimation and suggests that carefully de ned realistic models can be important for computer vision. More work at the intersection of vision and graphics is thus encouraged.

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PDF [BibTex]


From Scans to Models: Registration of 3D Human Shapes Exploiting Texture Information
From Scans to Models: Registration of 3D Human Shapes Exploiting Texture Information

Bogo, F.

University of Padova, March 2015 (phdthesis)

Abstract
New scanning technologies are increasing the importance of 3D mesh data, and of algorithms that can reliably register meshes obtained from multiple scans. Surface registration is important e.g. for building full 3D models from partial scans, identifying and tracking objects in a 3D scene, creating statistical shape models. Human body registration is particularly important for many applications, ranging from biomedicine and robotics to the production of movies and video games; but obtaining accurate and reliable registrations is challenging, given the articulated, non-rigidly deformable structure of the human body. In this thesis, we tackle the problem of 3D human body registration. We start by analyzing the current state of the art, and find that: a) most registration techniques rely only on geometric information, which is ambiguous on flat surface areas; b) there is a lack of adequate datasets and benchmarks in the field. We address both issues. Our contribution is threefold. First, we present a model-based registration technique for human meshes that combines geometry and surface texture information to provide highly accurate mesh-to-mesh correspondences. Our approach estimates scene lighting and surface albedo, and uses the albedo to construct a high-resolution textured 3D body model that is brought into registration with multi-camera image data using a robust matching term. Second, by leveraging our technique, we present FAUST (Fine Alignment Using Scan Texture), a novel dataset collecting 300 high-resolution scans of 10 people in a wide range of poses. FAUST is the first dataset providing both real scans and automatically computed, reliable "ground-truth" correspondences between them. Third, we explore possible uses of our approach in dermatology. By combining our registration technique with a melanocytic lesion segmentation algorithm, we propose a system that automatically detects new or evolving lesions over almost the entire body surface, thus helping dermatologists identify potential melanomas. We conclude this thesis investigating the benefits of using texture information to establish frame-to-frame correspondences in dynamic monocular sequences captured with consumer depth cameras. We outline a novel approach to reconstruct realistic body shape and appearance models from dynamic human performances, and show preliminary results on challenging sequences captured with a Kinect.

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[BibTex]


Long Range Motion Estimation and Applications
Long Range Motion Estimation and Applications

Sevilla-Lara, L.

Long Range Motion Estimation and Applications, University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Febuary 2015 (phdthesis)

Abstract
Finding correspondences between images underlies many computer vision problems, such as optical flow, tracking, stereovision and alignment. Finding these correspondences involves formulating a matching function and optimizing it. This optimization process is often gradient descent, which avoids exhaustive search, but relies on the assumption of being in the basin of attraction of the right local minimum. This is often the case when the displacement is small, and current methods obtain very accurate results for small motions. However, when the motion is large and the matching function is bumpy this assumption is less likely to be true. One traditional way of avoiding this abruptness is to smooth the matching function spatially by blurring the images. As the displacement becomes larger, the amount of blur required to smooth the matching function becomes also larger. This averaging of pixels leads to a loss of detail in the image. Therefore, there is a trade-off between the size of the objects that can be tracked and the displacement that can be captured. In this thesis we address the basic problem of increasing the size of the basin of attraction in a matching function. We use an image descriptor called distribution fields (DFs). By blurring the images in DF space instead of in pixel space, we in- crease the size of the basin attraction with respect to traditional methods. We show competitive results using DFs both in object tracking and optical flow. Finally we demonstrate an application of capturing large motions for temporal video stitching.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Cognitive Brain-Computer Interface for Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Hohmann, M.

Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, Germany, 2015 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Sequential Image Deconvolution Using Probabilistic Linear Algebra

Gao, M.

Technical University of Munich, Germany, 2015 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Causal Inference in Neuroimaging

Casarsa de Azevedo, L.

Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, Germany, 2015 (mastersthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The effect of frowning on attention

Ibarra Chaoul, A.

Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, Germany, 2015 (mastersthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2014


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Modeling the polygenic architecture of complex traits

Rakitsch, Barbara

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, November 2014 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

2014


[BibTex]


Modeling the Human Body in 3D: Data Registration and Human Shape Representation
Modeling the Human Body in 3D: Data Registration and Human Shape Representation

Tsoli, A.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, May 2014 (phdthesis)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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A Novel Causal Inference Method for Time Series

Shajarisales, N.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2014 (mastersthesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A global analysis of extreme events and consequences for the terrestrial carbon cycle

Zscheischler, J.

Diss. No. 22043, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, 2014 (phdthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Development of advanced methods for improving astronomical images

Schmeißer, N.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2014 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The Feasibility of Causal Discovery in Complex Systems: An Examination of Climate Change Attribution and Detection

Lacosse, E.

Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, Germany, Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, Germany, 2014 (mastersthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Causal Discovery in the Presence of Time-Dependent Relations or Small Sample Size

Huang, B.

Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, Germany, Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, Germany, 2014 (mastersthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Analysis of Distance Functions in Graphs

Alamgir, M.

University of Hamburg, Germany, University of Hamburg, Germany, 2014 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2012


Virtual Human Bodies with Clothing and Hair: From Images to Animation
Virtual Human Bodies with Clothing and Hair: From Images to Animation

Guan, P.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, December 2012 (phdthesis)

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pdf [BibTex]

2012


pdf [BibTex]


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Scalable graph kernels

Shervashidze, N.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, October 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


From Pixels to Layers: Joint Motion Estimation and Segmentation
From Pixels to Layers: Joint Motion Estimation and Segmentation

Sun, D.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, July 2012 (phdthesis)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Learning Motor Skills: From Algorithms to Robot Experiments

Kober, J.

Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, March 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Structure and Dynamics of Diffusion Networks

Gomez Rodriguez, M.

Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Blind Deconvolution in Scientific Imaging & Computational Photography

Hirsch, M.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2012 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]

2005


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Extension to Kernel Dependency Estimation with Applications to Robotics

BakIr, G.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, November 2005 (phdthesis)

Abstract
Kernel Dependency Estimation(KDE) is a novel technique which was designed to learn mappings between sets without making assumptions on the type of the involved input and output data. It learns the mapping in two stages. In a first step, it tries to estimate coordinates of a feature space representation of elements of the set by solving a high dimensional multivariate regression problem in feature space. Following this, it tries to reconstruct the original representation given the estimated coordinates. This thesis introduces various algorithmic extensions to both stages in KDE. One of the contributions of this thesis is to propose a novel linear regression algorithm that explores low-dimensional subspaces during learning. Furthermore various existing strategies for reconstructing patterns from feature maps involved in KDE are discussed and novel pre-image techniques are introduced. In particular, pre-image techniques for data-types that are of discrete nature such as graphs and strings are investigated. KDE is then explored in the context of robot pose imitation where the input is a an image with a human operator and the output is the robot articulated variables. Thus, using KDE, robot pose imitation is formulated as a regression problem.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

2005


PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Geometrical aspects of statistical learning theory

Hein, M.

Biologische Kybernetik, Darmstadt, Darmstadt, November 2005 (phdthesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Implicit Surfaces For Modelling Human Heads

Steinke, F.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen, September 2005 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Machine Learning Methods for Brain-Computer Interdaces

Lal, TN.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Darmstadt, September 2005 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Efficient Adaptive Sampling of the Psychometric Function by Maximizing Information Gain

Tanner, TG.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls University Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, May 2005 (diplomathesis)

Abstract
A common task in psychophysics is to measure the psychometric function. A psychometric function can be described by its shape and four parameters: offset or threshold, slope or width, false alarm rate or chance level and miss or lapse rate. Depending on the parameters of interest some points on the psychometric function may be more informative than others. Adaptive methods attempt to place trials on the most informative points based on the data collected in previous trials. A new Bayesian adaptive psychometric method placing trials by minimising the expected entropy of the posterior probabilty dis- tribution over a set of possible stimuli is introduced. The method is more flexible, faster and at least as efficient as the established method (Kontsevich and Tyler, 1999). Comparably accurate (2dB) threshold and slope estimates can be obtained after about 30 and 500 trials, respectively. By using a dynamic termination criterion the efficiency can be further improved. The method can be applied to all experimental designs including yes/no designs and allows acquisition of any set of free parameters. By weighting the importance of parameters one can include nuisance parameters and adjust the relative expected errors. Use of nuisance parameters may lead to more accurate estimates than assuming a guessed fixed value. Block designs are supported and do not harm the performance if a sufficient number of trials are performed. The method was evaluated by computer simulations in which the role of parametric assumptions, its robustness, the quality of different point estimates, the effect of dynamic termination criteria and many other settings were investigated.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2001


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Variationsverfahren zur Untersuchung von Grundzustandseigenschaften des Ein-Band Hubbard-Modells

Eichhorn, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden/Germany, May 2001 (diplomathesis)

Abstract
Using different modifications of a new variational approach, statical groundstate properties of the one-band Hubbard model such as energy and staggered magnetisation are calculated. By taking into account additional fluctuations, the method ist gradually improved so that a very good description of the energy in one and two dimensions can be achieved. After a detailed discussion of the application in one dimension, extensions for two dimensions are introduced. By use of a modified version of the variational ansatz in particular a description of the quantum phase transition for the magnetisation should be possible.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

2001


PostScript [BibTex]