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2019


Towards Geometric Understanding of Motion
Towards Geometric Understanding of Motion

Ranjan, A.

University of Tübingen, December 2019 (phdthesis)

Abstract

The motion of the world is inherently dependent on the spatial structure of the world and its geometry. Therefore, classical optical flow methods try to model this geometry to solve for the motion. However, recent deep learning methods take a completely different approach. They try to predict optical flow by learning from labelled data. Although deep networks have shown state-of-the-art performance on classification problems in computer vision, they have not been as effective in solving optical flow. The key reason is that deep learning methods do not explicitly model the structure of the world in a neural network, and instead expect the network to learn about the structure from data. We hypothesize that it is difficult for a network to learn about motion without any constraint on the structure of the world. Therefore, we explore several approaches to explicitly model the geometry of the world and its spatial structure in deep neural networks.

The spatial structure in images can be captured by representing it at multiple scales. To represent multiple scales of images in deep neural nets, we introduce a Spatial Pyramid Network (SpyNet). Such a network can leverage global information for estimating large motions and local information for estimating small motions. We show that SpyNet significantly improves over previous optical flow networks while also being the smallest and fastest neural network for motion estimation. SPyNet achieves a 97% reduction in model parameters over previous methods and is more accurate.

The spatial structure of the world extends to people and their motion. Humans have a very well-defined structure, and this information is useful in estimating optical flow for humans. To leverage this information, we create a synthetic dataset for human optical flow using a statistical human body model and motion capture sequences. We use this dataset to train deep networks and see significant improvement in the ability of the networks to estimate human optical flow.

The structure and geometry of the world affects the motion. Therefore, learning about the structure of the scene together with the motion can benefit both problems. To facilitate this, we introduce Competitive Collaboration, where several neural networks are constrained by geometry and can jointly learn about structure and motion in the scene without any labels. To this end, we show that jointly learning single view depth prediction, camera motion, optical flow and motion segmentation using Competitive Collaboration achieves state-of-the-art results among unsupervised approaches.

Our findings provide support for our hypothesis that explicit constraints on structure and geometry of the world lead to better methods for motion estimation.

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PhD Thesis [BibTex]

2019


PhD Thesis [BibTex]


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Robot Learning for Muscular Systems

Büchler, D.

Technical University Darmstadt, Germany, December 2019 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Real Time Probabilistic Models for Robot Trajectories

Gomez-Gonzalez, S.

Technical University Darmstadt, Germany, December 2019 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Automatic Segmentation and Labelling for Robot Table Tennis Time Series

Lutz, P.

Technical University Darmstadt, Germany, August 2019 (thesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning for a Two-Robot Table Tennis Simulation

Li, G.

RWTH Aachen University, Germany, July 2019 (mastersthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


The acoustic hologram and particle manipulation with structured acoustic fields
The acoustic hologram and particle manipulation with structured acoustic fields

Melde, K.

Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), May 2019 (phdthesis)

Abstract
This thesis presents holograms as a novel approach to create arbitrary ultrasound fields. It is shown how any wavefront can simply be encoded in the thickness profile of a phase plate. Contemporary 3D-printers enable fabrication of structured surfaces with feature sizes corresponding to wavelengths of ultrasound up to 7.5 MHz in water—covering the majority of medical and industrial applications. The whole workflow for designing and creating acoustic holograms has been developed and is presented in this thesis. To reconstruct the encoded fields a single transducer element is sufficient. Arbitrary fields are demonstrated in transmission and reflection configurations in water and air and validated by extensive hydrophone scans. To complement these time-consuming measurements a new approach, based on thermography, is presented, which enables volumetric sound field scans in just a few seconds. Several original experiments demonstrate the advantages of using acoustic holograms for particle manipulation. Most notably, directed parallel assembly of microparticles in the shape of a projected acoustic image has been shown and extended to a fabrication method by fusing the particles in a polymerization reaction. Further, seemingly dynamic propulsion from a static hologram is demonstrated by controlling the phase gradient along a projected track. The necessary complexity to create ultrasound fields with set amplitude and phase distributions is easily managed using acoustic holograms. The acoustic hologram is a simple and cost-effective tool for shaping ultrasound fields with high-fidelity. It is expected to have an impact in many applications where ultrasound is employed.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Fast and Resource-Efficient Control of Wireless Cyber-Physical Systems
Fast and Resource-Efficient Control of Wireless Cyber-Physical Systems

Baumann, D.

KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Febuary 2019 (phdthesis)

ics

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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X-ray microscopic characterization of high-Tc-supercoductors using image processing

Bihler, M.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2019 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]


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Learning Transferable Representations

Rojas-Carulla, M.

University of Cambridge, UK, 2019 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Sample-efficient deep reinforcement learning for continuous control

Gu, S.

University of Cambridge, UK, 2019 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]


Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems - Highlights
Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems - Highlights
2019 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
In the future, artificially intelligent systems will substantially change the way we live, work, and communicate. Intelligent systems will become increasingly important in all spheres of life – as virtual systems on the Internet, or as cyber-physical systems in the real world. Artificial intelligence (AI) will be used for autonomous driving, as well as to diagnose and fight diseases, or to carry out emergency operations that are too dangerous for humans. This is just the beginning.

MPI IS Yearbook 2019 (en) MPI IS Jahresbericht 2019 (de) [BibTex]


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Ferromagnetic colloids in liquid crystal solvents

Zarubin, G.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2019 (phdthesis)

icm

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Fluctuating interface with a pinning potential

Pranjić, Daniel

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2019 (mastersthesis)

icm

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Spatial Filtering based on Riemannian Manifold for Brain-Computer Interfacing

Xu, J.

Technical University of Munich, Germany, 2019 (mastersthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Novel X-ray lenses for direct and coherent imaging

Sanli, U. T.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2019 (phdthesis)

mms

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Quantification of tumor heterogeneity using PET/MRI and machine learning

Katiyar, P.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2019 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Controlling pattern formation in the confined Schnakenberg model

Beyer, David Bernhard

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2019 (mastersthesis)

icm

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Dynamics of self-propelled colloids and their application as active matter
Dynamics of self-propelled colloids and their application as active matter

Choudhury, U.

University of Groningen, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, 2019 (phdthesis)

Abstract
In this thesis, the behavior of active particles spanning from single particle dynamics to collective behavior of many particles is explored. Active colloids are out-of equilibrium systems that have been studied extensively over the past 15 years. This thesis addresses several phenomena that arise in the field of active colloids.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Interfaces in fluids of ionic liquid crystals

Bartsch, H.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2019 (phdthesis)

icm

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Actively Learning Dynamical Systems with Gaussian Processes

Buisson-Fenet, M.

Mines ParisTech, PSL University, 2019 (mastersthesis)

Abstract
Predicting the behavior of complex systems is of great importance in many fields such as engineering, economics or meteorology. The evolution of such systems often follows a certain structure, which can be induced, for example from the laws of physics or of market forces. Mathematically, this structure is often captured by differential equations. The internal functional dependencies, however, are usually unknown. Hence, using machine learning approaches that recreate this structure directly from data is a promising alternative to designing physics-based models. In particular, for high dimensional systems with nonlinear effects, this can be a challenging task. Learning dynamical systems is different from the classical machine learning tasks, such as image processing, and necessitates different tools. Indeed, dynamical systems can be actuated, often by applying torques or voltages. Hence, the user has a power of decision over the system, and can drive it to certain states by going through the dynamics. Actuating this system generates data, from which a machine learning model of the dynamics can be trained. However, gathering informative data that is representative of the whole state space remains a challenging task. The question of active learning then becomes important: which control inputs should be chosen by the user so that the data generated during an experiment is informative, and enables efficient training of the dynamics model? In this context, Gaussian processes can be a useful framework for approximating system dynamics. Indeed, they perform well on small and medium sized data sets, as opposed to most other machine learning frameworks. This is particularly important considering data is often costly to generate and process, most of all when producing it involves actuating a complex physical system. Gaussian processes also yield a notion of uncertainty, which indicates how sure the model is about its predictions. In this work, we investigate in a principled way how to actively learn dynamical systems, by selecting control inputs that generate informative data. We model the system dynamics by a Gaussian process, and use information-theoretic criteria to identify control trajectories that maximize the information gain. Thus, the input space can be explored efficiently, leading to a data-efficient training of the model. We propose several methods, investigate their theoretical properties and compare them extensively in a numerical benchmark. The final method proves to be efficient at generating informative data. Thus, it yields the lowest prediction error with the same amount of samples on most benchmark systems. We propose several variants of this method, allowing the user to trade off computations with prediction accuracy, and show it is versatile enough to take additional objectives into account.

ics

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2013


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Camera-specific Image Denoising

Schober, M.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, October 2013 (diplomathesis)

ei pn

PDF [BibTex]

2013


PDF [BibTex]


Statistics on Manifolds with Applications to Modeling Shape Deformations
Statistics on Manifolds with Applications to Modeling Shape Deformations

Freifeld, O.

Brown University, August 2013 (phdthesis)

Abstract
Statistical models of non-rigid deformable shape have wide application in many fi elds, including computer vision, computer graphics, and biometry. We show that shape deformations are well represented through nonlinear manifolds that are also matrix Lie groups. These pattern-theoretic representations lead to several advantages over other alternatives, including a principled measure of shape dissimilarity and a natural way to compose deformations. Moreover, they enable building models using statistics on manifolds. Consequently, such models are superior to those based on Euclidean representations. We demonstrate this by modeling 2D and 3D human body shape. Shape deformations are only one example of manifold-valued data. More generally, in many computer-vision and machine-learning problems, nonlinear manifold representations arise naturally and provide a powerful alternative to Euclidean representations. Statistics is traditionally concerned with data in a Euclidean space, relying on the linear structure and the distances associated with such a space; this renders it inappropriate for nonlinear spaces. Statistics can, however, be generalized to nonlinear manifolds. Moreover, by respecting the underlying geometry, the statistical models result in not only more e ffective analysis but also consistent synthesis. We go beyond previous work on statistics on manifolds by showing how, even on these curved spaces, problems related to modeling a class from scarce data can be dealt with by leveraging information from related classes residing in di fferent regions of the space. We show the usefulness of our approach with 3D shape deformations. To summarize our main contributions: 1) We de fine a new 2D articulated model -- more expressive than traditional ones -- of deformable human shape that factors body-shape, pose, and camera variations. Its high realism is obtained from training data generated from a detailed 3D model. 2) We defi ne a new manifold-based representation of 3D shape deformations that yields statistical deformable-template models that are better than the current state-of-the- art. 3) We generalize a transfer learning idea from Euclidean spaces to Riemannian manifolds. This work demonstrates the value of modeling manifold-valued data and their statistics explicitly on the manifold. Specifi cally, the methods here provide new tools for shape analysis.

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pdf Project Page [BibTex]


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Modelling and Learning Approaches to Image Denoising

Burger, HC.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2013 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Perceiving Systems – Computers that see

Gehler, P. V.

2013 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Our research goal is to define in a mathematical precise way how visual perception works. We want to describe how intelligent systems understand images. To this end we study probabilistic models and statistical learning. Encoding prior knowledge about the world is complemented with automatic learning from training data. One aspect is being able to identify physical factors in images, such as lighting, geometry, and materials. Furthermore we want to automatically recognize and give names to objects and persons in images and understand the scene as a whole.

link (url) [BibTex]


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Linear mixed models for genome-wide association studies

Lippert, C.

University of Tübingen, Germany, 2013 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Brownian motion of optically trapped ellipsoids

Dibak, Manuel

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2013 (mastersthesis)

icm

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Being small, being smart

Liu, Na

2013 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Metallic nanostructures feature plasmonic resonances which spatially confine light on the nanometer scale. In the ultimate limit of a single nanostructure, the electromagnetic field can be strongly concentrated in a volume of only a few hundred nm3 or less. We utilize such plasmonic focusing for hydrogen detection at the single particle level, which avoids any inhomogeneous broadening and statistical effects that would occur in sensors based on nanoparticle ensembles. This concept paves the road towards the observation of single catalytic processes in nanoreactors.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Phase behavior of colloidal suspensions with critical solvents

Mohry, T. F.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2013 (phdthesis)

icm

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Modeling and Learning Complex Motor Tasks: A case study on Robot Table Tennis

Mülling, K.

Technical University Darmstadt, Germany, 2013 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Zweidimensionale Monte-Carlo-Gittersimulationen im muVT- und NpT-Ensemble

Kirn, Kai Ludwig

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2013 (mastersthesis)

icm

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Intention Inference and Decision Making with Hierarchical Gaussian Process Dynamics Models

Wang, Z.

Technical University Darmstadt, Germany, 2013 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]


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Permittivity of an inhomogeneous dipolar lattice fluid

Schütz, Christian

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2013 (mastersthesis)

icm

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Quantum kinetic theory for demagnetization after femtosecond laser pulses

Teeny, N.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2013 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2008


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Reinforcement Learning for Motor Primitives

Kober, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany, August 2008 (diplomathesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

2008


PDF [BibTex]


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Asymmetries of Time Series under Inverting their Direction

Peters, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Heidelberg, August 2008 (diplomathesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Learning an Interest Operator from Human Eye Movements

Kienzle, W.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, July 2008 (phdthesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Causal inference from statistical data

Sun, X.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Hochschule Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Germany, April 2008 (phdthesis)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Pairwise Correlations and Multineuronal Firing Patterns in Primary Visual Cortex

Berens, P.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, April 2008 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Development and Application of a Python Scripting Framework for BCI2000

Schreiner, T.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, January 2008 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Efficient and Invariant Regularisation with Application to Computer Graphics

Walder, CJ.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, January 2008 (phdthesis)

Abstract
This thesis develops the theory and practise of reproducing kernel methods. Many functional inverse problems which arise in, for example, machine learning and computer graphics, have been treated with practical success using methods based on a reproducing kernel Hilbert space perspective. This perspective is often theoretically convenient, in that many functional analysis problems reduce to linear algebra problems in these spaces. Somewhat more complex is the case of conditionally positive definite kernels, and we provide an introduction to both cases, deriving in a particularly elementary manner some key results for the conditionally positive definite case. A common complaint of the practitioner is the long running time of these kernel based algorithms. We provide novel ways of alleviating these problems by essentially using a non-standard function basis which yields computational advantages. That said, by doing so we must also forego the aforementioned theoretical conveniences, and hence need some additional analysis which we provide in order to make the approach practicable. We demonstrate that the method leads to state of the art performance on the problem of surface reconstruction from points. We also provide some analysis of kernels invariant to transformations such as translation and dilation, and show that this indicates the value of learning algorithms which use conditionally positive definite kernels. Correspondingly, we provide a few approaches for making such algorithms practicable. We do this either by modifying the kernel, or directly solving problems with conditionally positive definite kernels, which had previously only been solved with positive definite kernels. We demonstrate the advantage of this approach, in particular by attaining state of the art classification performance with only one free parameter.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Entropic Forces on Bio-Molecules

Hansen-Goos, H.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2008 (phdthesis)

icm

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Wetting of geometrically structured substrates

Marinescu, M.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany, 2008 (mastersthesis)

icm

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Fluktuations- und Kapillarkräfte zwischen Kolloiden an fluiden Grenzflächen

Lehle, H.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2008 (phdthesis)

icm

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]