Header logo is


2016


Thumb xl screen shot 2016 06 27 at 09.38.59
Implications of Action-Oriented Paradigm Shifts in Cognitive Science

Dominey, P. F., Prescott, T. J., Bohg, J., Engel, A. K., Gallagher, S., Heed, T., Hoffmann, M., Knoblich, G., Prinz, W., Schwartz, A.

In The Pragmatic Turn - Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science, 18, pages: 333-356, 20, Strüngmann Forum Reports, vol. 18, J. Lupp, series editor, (Editors: Andreas K. Engel and Karl J. Friston and Danica Kragic), The MIT Press, 18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum, May 2016 (incollection) In press

Abstract
An action-oriented perspective changes the role of an individual from a passive observer to an actively engaged agent interacting in a closed loop with the world as well as with others. Cognition exists to serve action within a landscape that contains both. This chapter surveys this landscape and addresses the status of the pragmatic turn. Its potential influence on science and the study of cognition are considered (including perception, social cognition, social interaction, sensorimotor entrainment, and language acquisition) and its impact on how neuroscience is studied is also investigated (with the notion that brains do not passively build models, but instead support the guidance of action). A review of its implications in robotics and engineering includes a discussion of the application of enactive control principles to couple action and perception in robotics as well as the conceptualization of system design in a more holistic, less modular manner. Practical applications that can impact the human condition are reviewed (e.g. educational applications, treatment possibilities for developmental and psychopathological disorders, the development of neural prostheses). All of this foreshadows the potential societal implications of the pragmatic turn. The chapter concludes that an action-oriented approach emphasizes a continuum of interaction between technical aspects of cognitive systems and robotics, biology, psychology, the social sciences, and the humanities, where the individual is part of a grounded cultural system.

am

The Pragmatic Turn - Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science 18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum Bibliography Chapter link (url) [BibTex]

2016


The Pragmatic Turn - Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science 18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum Bibliography Chapter link (url) [BibTex]


Thumb xl looplearning
Learning Action-Perception Cycles in Robotics: A Question of Representations and Embodiment

Bohg, J., Kragic, D.

In The Pragmatic Turn - Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science, 18, pages: 309-320, 18, Strüngmann Forum Reports, vol. 18, J. Lupp, series editor, (Editors: Andreas K. Engel and Karl J. Friston and Danica Kragic), The MIT Press, 18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum, May 2016 (incollection) In press

Abstract
Since the 1950s, robotics research has sought to build a general-purpose agent capable of autonomous, open-ended interaction with realistic, unconstrained environments. Cognition is perceived to be at the core of this process, yet understanding has been challenged because cognition is referred to differently within and across research areas, and is not clearly defined. The classic robotics approach is decomposition into functional modules which perform planning, reasoning, and problem-solving or provide input to these mechanisms. Although advancements have been made and numerous success stories reported in specific niches, this systems-engineering approach has not succeeded in building such a cognitive agent. The emergence of an action-oriented paradigm offers a new approach: action and perception are no longer separable into functional modules but must be considered in a complete loop. This chapter reviews work on different mechanisms for action- perception learning and discusses the role of embodiment in the design of the underlying representations and learning. It discusses the evaluation of agents and suggests the development of a new embodied Turing Test. Appropriate scenarios need to be devised in addition to current competitions, so that abilities can be tested over long time periods.

am

18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum The Pragmatic Turn- Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science Bibliography Chapter link (url) [BibTex]

18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum The Pragmatic Turn- Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science Bibliography Chapter link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Nonlinear functional causal models for distinguishing cause from effect

Zhang, K., Hyvärinen, A.

In Statistics and Causality: Methods for Applied Empirical Research, pages: 185-201, 8, 1st, (Editors: Wolfgang Wiedermann and Alexander von Eye), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2016 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A cognitive brain–computer interface for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Hohmann, M., Fomina, T., Jayaram, V., Widmann, N., Förster, C., Just, J., Synofzik, M., Schölkopf, B., Schöls, L., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

In Brain-Computer Interfaces: Lab Experiments to Real-World Applications, 228(Supplement C):221-239, 8, Progress in Brain Research, (Editors: Damien Coyle), Elsevier, 2016 (incollection)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Locally Weighted Regression for Control

Ting, J., Meier, F., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning and Data Mining, pages: 1-14, Springer US, Boston, MA, 2016 (inbook)

am

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2012


no image
Expectation-Maximization methods for solving (PO)MDPs and optimal control problems

Toussaint, M., Storkey, A., Harmeling, S.

In Inference and Learning in Dynamic Models, (Editors: Barber, D., Cemgil, A.T. and Chiappa, S.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, January 2012 (inbook) In press

ei

PDF [BibTex]

2012


PDF [BibTex]


no image
Inferential structure determination from NMR data

Habeck, M.

In Bayesian methods in structural bioinformatics, pages: 287-312, (Editors: Hamelryck, T., Mardia, K. V. and Ferkinghoff-Borg, J.), Springer, New York, 2012 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Robot Learning

Sigaud, O., Peters, J.

In Encyclopedia of the sciences of learning, (Editors: Seel, N.M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Reinforcement Learning in Robotics: A Survey

Kober, J., Peters, J.

In Reinforcement Learning, 12, pages: 579-610, (Editors: Wiering, M. and Otterlo, M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

Abstract
As most action generation problems of autonomous robots can be phrased in terms of sequential decision problems, robotics offers a tremendously important and interesting application platform for reinforcement learning. Similarly, the real-world challenges of this domain pose a major real-world check for reinforcement learning. Hence, the interplay between both disciplines can be seen as promising as the one between physics and mathematics. Nevertheless, only a fraction of the scientists working on reinforcement learning are sufficiently tied to robotics to oversee most problems encountered in this context. Thus, we will bring the most important challenges faced by robot reinforcement learning to their attention. To achieve this goal, we will attempt to survey most work that has successfully applied reinforcement learning to behavior generation for real robots. We discuss how the presented successful approaches have been made tractable despite the complexity of the domain and will study how representations or the inclusion of prior knowledge can make a significant difference. As a result, a particular focus of our chapter lies on the choice between model-based and model-free as well as between value function-based and policy search methods. As a result, we obtain a fairly complete survey of robot reinforcement learning which should allow a general reinforcement learning researcher to understand this domain.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Higher-Order Tensors in Diffusion MRI

Schultz, T., Fuster, A., Ghosh, A., Deriche, R., Florack, L., Lim, L.

In Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data, (Editors: Westin, C. F., Vilanova, A. and Burgeth, B.), Springer, 2012 (inbook) Accepted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Automated Tip-Based 2-D Mechanical Assembly of Micro/Nanoparticles

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

In Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms, pages: 69-108, Springer US, 2012 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
The principles of XMCD and its application to L-edges in transition metals

Schütz, G.

In Linear and Chiral Dichroism in the Electron Miroscope, pages: 23-42, Pan Stanford Publishing Pte.Ltd., Singapore, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl multiclasshf
An Introduction to Random Forests for Multi-class Object Detection

Gall, J., Razavi, N., van Gool, L.

In Outdoor and Large-Scale Real-World Scene Analysis, 7474, pages: 243-263, LNCS, (Editors: Dellaert, Frank and Frahm, Jan-Michael and Pollefeys, Marc and Rosenhahn, Bodo and Leal-Taix’e, Laura), Springer, 2012 (incollection)

ps

code code for Hough forest publisher's site pdf Project Page [BibTex]

code code for Hough forest publisher's site pdf Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl kinectbookchap
Home 3D body scans from noisy image and range data

Weiss, A., Hirshberg, D., Black, M. J.

In Consumer Depth Cameras for Computer Vision: Research Topics and Applications, pages: 99-118, 6, (Editors: Andrea Fossati and Juergen Gall and Helmut Grabner and Xiaofeng Ren and Kurt Konolige), Springer-Verlag, 2012 (incollection)

ps

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Structural and chemical characterization on the nanoscale

Stierle, A., Carstanjen, H.-D., Hofmann, S.

In Nanoelectronics and Information Technology. Advanced Electronic Materials and Novel Devices, pages: 233-254, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Rutherford Backscattering

Carstanjen, H. D.

In Nanoelectronics and Information Technology. Advanced Electronic Materials and Novel Devices, pages: 250-252, WILEY-VCH Verlag, Weinheim, Germany, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2011


no image
Projected Newton-type methods in machine learning

Schmidt, M., Kim, D., Sra, S.

In Optimization for Machine Learning, pages: 305-330, (Editors: Sra, S., Nowozin, S. and Wright, S. J.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2011 (inbook)

Abstract
We consider projected Newton-type methods for solving large-scale optimization problems arising in machine learning and related fields. We first introduce an algorithmic framework for projected Newton-type methods by reviewing a canonical projected (quasi-)Newton method. This method, while conceptually pleasing, has a high computation cost per iteration. Thus, we discuss two variants that are more scalable, namely, two-metric projection and inexact projection methods. Finally, we show how to apply the Newton-type framework to handle non-smooth objectives. Examples are provided throughout the chapter to illustrate machine learning applications of our framework.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2011


PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Statistical Learning Theory: Models, Concepts, and Results

von Luxburg, U., Schölkopf, B.

In Handbook of the History of Logic, Vol. 10: Inductive Logic, 10, pages: 651-706, (Editors: Gabbay, D. M., Hartmann, S. and Woods, J. H.), Elsevier North Holland, Amsterdam, Netherlands, May 2011 (inbook)

Abstract
Statistical learning theory provides the theoretical basis for many of today's machine learning algorithms and is arguably one of the most beautifully developed branches of artificial intelligence in general. It originated in Russia in the 1960s and gained wide popularity in the 1990s following the development of the so-called Support Vector Machine (SVM), which has become a standard tool for pattern recognition in a variety of domains ranging from computer vision to computational biology. Providing the basis of new learning algorithms, however, was not the only motivation for developing statistical learning theory. It was just as much a philosophical one, attempting to answer the question of what it is that allows us to draw valid conclusions from empirical data. In this article we attempt to give a gentle, non-technical overview over the key ideas and insights of statistical learning theory. We do not assume that the reader has a deep background in mathematics, statistics, or computer science. Given the nature of the subject matter, however, some familiarity with mathematical concepts and notations and some intuitive understanding of basic probability is required. There exist many excellent references to more technical surveys of the mathematics of statistical learning theory: the monographs by one of the founders of statistical learning theory ([Vapnik, 1995], [Vapnik, 1998]), a brief overview over statistical learning theory in Section 5 of [Sch{\"o}lkopf and Smola, 2002], more technical overview papers such as [Bousquet et al., 2003], [Mendelson, 2003], [Boucheron et al., 2005], [Herbrich and Williamson, 2002], and the monograph [Devroye et al., 1996].

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Robot Learning

Peters, J., Tedrake, R., Roy, N., Morimoto, J.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, pages: 865-869, Encyclopedia of machine learning, (Editors: Sammut, C. and Webb, G. I.), Springer, New York, NY, USA, January 2011 (inbook)

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
What You Expect Is What You Get? Potential Use of Contingent Negative Variation for Passive BCI Systems in Gaze-Based HCI

Ihme, K., Zander, TO.

In Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, 6975, pages: 447-456, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: D’Mello, S., Graesser, A., Schuller, B. and Martin, J.-C.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2011 (inbook)

Abstract
When using eye movements for cursor control in human-computer interaction (HCI), it may be difficult to find an appropriate substitute for the click operation. Most approaches make use of dwell times. However, in this context the so-called Midas-Touch-Problem occurs which means that the system wrongly interprets fixations due to long processing times or spontaneous dwellings of the user as command. Lately it has been shown that brain-computer interface (BCI) input bears good prospects to overcome this problem using imagined hand movements to elicit a selection. The current approach tries to develop this idea further by exploring potential signals for the use in a passive BCI, which would have the advantage that the brain signals used as input are generated automatically without conscious effort of the user. To explore event-related potentials (ERPs) giving information about the user’s intention to select an object, 32-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from ten participants interacting with a dwell-time-based system. Comparing ERP signals during the dwell time with those occurring during fixations on a neutral cross hair, a sustained negative slow cortical potential at central electrode sites was revealed. This negativity might be a contingent negative variation (CNV) reflecting the participants’ anticipation of the upcoming selection. Offline classification suggests that the CNV is detectable in single trial (mean accuracy 74.9 %). In future, research on the CNV should be accomplished to ensure its stable occurence in human-computer interaction and render possible its use as a potential substitue for the click operation.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Kernel Methods in Bioinformatics

Borgwardt, KM.

In Handbook of Statistical Bioinformatics, pages: 317-334, Springer Handbooks of Computational Statistics ; 3, (Editors: Lu, H.H.-S., Schölkopf, B. and Zhao, H.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2011 (inbook)

Abstract
Kernel methods have now witnessed more than a decade of increasing popularity in the bioinformatics community. In this article, we will compactly review this development, examining the areas in which kernel methods have contributed to computational biology and describing the reasons for their success.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Cue Combination: Beyond Optimality

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F.

In Sensory Cue Integration, pages: 144-152, (Editors: Trommershäuser, J., Körding, K. and Landy, M. S.), Oxford University Press, 2011 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Automated Control of AFM Based Nanomanipulation

Xie, H., Onal, C., Régnier, S., Sitti, M.

In Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics, pages: 237-311, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2011 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Teleoperation Based AFM Manipulation Control

Xie, H., Onal, C., Régnier, S., Sitti, M.

In Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics, pages: 145-235, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2011 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Descriptions and challenges of AFM based nanorobotic systems

Xie, H., Onal, C., Régnier, S., Sitti, M.

In Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics, pages: 13-29, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2011 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Tipping the Scales: Guidance and Intrinsically Motivated Behavior

Martius, G., Herrmann, J. M.

In Advances in Artificial Life, ECAL 2011, pages: 506-513, (Editors: Tom Lenaerts and Mario Giacobini and Hugues Bersini and Paul Bourgine and Marco Dorigo and René Doursat), MIT Press, 2011 (incollection)

al

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl andriluka2011
Benchmark datasets for pose estimation and tracking

Andriluka, M., Sigal, L., Black, M. J.

In Visual Analysis of Humans: Looking at People, pages: 253-274, (Editors: Moesland and Hilton and Kr"uger and Sigal), Springer-Verlag, London, 2011 (incollection)

ps

publisher's site Project Page [BibTex]

publisher's site Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Applications of AFM Based Nanorobotic Systems

Xie, H., Onal, C., Régnier, S., Sitti, M.

In Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics, pages: 313-342, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2011 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl srf2011 2
Steerable random fields for image restoration and inpainting

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In Markov Random Fields for Vision and Image Processing, pages: 377-387, (Editors: Blake, A. and Kohli, P. and Rother, C.), MIT Press, 2011 (incollection)

Abstract
This chapter introduces the concept of a Steerable Random Field (SRF). In contrast to traditional Markov random field (MRF) models in low-level vision, the random field potentials of a SRF are defined in terms of filter responses that are steered to the local image structure. This steering uses the structure tensor to obtain derivative responses that are either aligned with, or orthogonal to, the predominant local image structure. Analysis of the statistics of these steered filter responses in natural images leads to the model proposed here. Clique potentials are defined over steered filter responses using a Gaussian scale mixture model and are learned from training data. The SRF model connects random fields with anisotropic regularization and provides a statistical motivation for the latter. Steering the random field to the local image structure improves image denoising and inpainting performance compared with traditional pairwise MRFs.

ps

publisher site [BibTex]

publisher site [BibTex]


no image
Nanomechanics of AFM based nanomanipulation

Xie, H., Onal, C., Régnier, S., Sitti, M.

In Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics, pages: 87-143, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2011 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Instrumentation Issues of an AFM Based Nanorobotic System

Xie, H., Onal, C., Régnier, S., Sitti, M.

In Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics, pages: 31-86, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2011 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Projected Newton-type methods in machine learning

Schmidt, M., Kim, D., Sra, S.

In Optimization for Machine Learning, pages: 305-330, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2011 (incollection)

Abstract
{We consider projected Newton-type methods for solving large-scale optimization problems arising in machine learning and related fields. We first introduce an algorithmic framework for projected Newton-type methods by reviewing a canonical projected (quasi-)Newton method. This method, while conceptually pleasing, has a high computation cost per iteration. Thus, we discuss two variants that are more scalable, namely, two-metric projection and inexact projection methods. Finally, we show how to apply the Newton-type framework to handle non-smooth objectives. Examples are provided throughout the chapter to illustrate machine learning applications of our framework.}

mms

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]