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Screening Rules for Convex Problems

Raj, A., Olbrich, J., Gärtner, B., Schölkopf, B., Jaggi, M.

2016 (unpublished) Submitted

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Interface-controlled phenomena in nanomaterials

Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Wang, Zumin

2016 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Nanosized material systems characteristically exhibit an excessively high internal interface density. A series of previously unknown phenomena in nanomaterials have been disclosed that are fundamentally caused by the presence of interfaces. Thus anomalously large and small lattice parameters in nanocrystalline metals, quantum stress oscillations in growing nanofilms, and extraordinary atomic mobility at ultralow temperatures have been observed and explained. The attained understanding for these new phenomena can lead to new, sophisticated applications of nanomaterials in advanced technologies.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Robots learn how to see

Geiger, A.

2016 (mpi_year_book)

Abstract
Autonomous vehicles and intelligent service robots could soon contribute to making our lives more pleasant and secure. However, for autonomous operation such systems first need to learn the perception process itself. This involves measuring distances and motions, detecting objects and interpreting the threedimensional world as a whole. While humans perceive their environment with seemingly little efforts, computers first need to be trained for these tasks. Our research is concerned with developing mathematical models which allow computers to robustly perceive their environment.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2000


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Advances in Large Margin Classifiers

Smola, A., Bartlett, P., Schölkopf, B., Schuurmans, D.

pages: 422, Neural Information Processing, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, October 2000 (book)

Abstract
The concept of large margins is a unifying principle for the analysis of many different approaches to the classification of data from examples, including boosting, mathematical programming, neural networks, and support vector machines. The fact that it is the margin, or confidence level, of a classification--that is, a scale parameter--rather than a raw training error that matters has become a key tool for dealing with classifiers. This book shows how this idea applies to both the theoretical analysis and the design of algorithms. The book provides an overview of recent developments in large margin classifiers, examines connections with other methods (e.g., Bayesian inference), and identifies strengths and weaknesses of the method, as well as directions for future research. Among the contributors are Manfred Opper, Vladimir Vapnik, and Grace Wahba.

ei

Web [BibTex]

2000


Web [BibTex]


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(book)

[BibTex]