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2016


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Skinned multi-person linear model

Black, M.J., Loper, M., Mahmood, N., Pons-Moll, G., Romero, J.

December 2016, Application PCT/EP2016/064610 (misc)

Abstract
The invention comprises a learned model of human body shape and pose dependent shape variation that is more accurate than previous models and is compatible with existing graphics pipelines. Our Skinned Multi-Person Linear model (SMPL) is a skinned vertex based model that accurately represents a wide variety of body shapes in natural human poses. The parameters of the model are learned from data including the rest pose template, blend weights, pose-dependent blend shapes, identity- dependent blend shapes, and a regressor from vertices to joint locations. Unlike previous models, the pose-dependent blend shapes are a linear function of the elements of the pose rotation matrices. This simple formulation enables training the entire model from a relatively large number of aligned 3D meshes of different people in different poses. The invention quantitatively evaluates variants of SMPL using linear or dual- quaternion blend skinning and show that both are more accurate than a Blend SCAPE model trained on the same data. In a further embodiment, the invention realistically models dynamic soft-tissue deformations. Because it is based on blend skinning, SMPL is compatible with existing rendering engines and we make it available for research purposes.

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Google Patents [BibTex]

2016


Google Patents [BibTex]


Thumb xl screen shot 2016 06 27 at 09.38.59
Implications of Action-Oriented Paradigm Shifts in Cognitive Science

Dominey, P. F., Prescott, T. J., Bohg, J., Engel, A. K., Gallagher, S., Heed, T., Hoffmann, M., Knoblich, G., Prinz, W., Schwartz, A.

In The Pragmatic Turn - Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science, 18, pages: 333-356, 20, Strüngmann Forum Reports, vol. 18, J. Lupp, series editor, (Editors: Andreas K. Engel and Karl J. Friston and Danica Kragic), The MIT Press, 18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum, May 2016 (incollection) In press

Abstract
An action-oriented perspective changes the role of an individual from a passive observer to an actively engaged agent interacting in a closed loop with the world as well as with others. Cognition exists to serve action within a landscape that contains both. This chapter surveys this landscape and addresses the status of the pragmatic turn. Its potential influence on science and the study of cognition are considered (including perception, social cognition, social interaction, sensorimotor entrainment, and language acquisition) and its impact on how neuroscience is studied is also investigated (with the notion that brains do not passively build models, but instead support the guidance of action). A review of its implications in robotics and engineering includes a discussion of the application of enactive control principles to couple action and perception in robotics as well as the conceptualization of system design in a more holistic, less modular manner. Practical applications that can impact the human condition are reviewed (e.g. educational applications, treatment possibilities for developmental and psychopathological disorders, the development of neural prostheses). All of this foreshadows the potential societal implications of the pragmatic turn. The chapter concludes that an action-oriented approach emphasizes a continuum of interaction between technical aspects of cognitive systems and robotics, biology, psychology, the social sciences, and the humanities, where the individual is part of a grounded cultural system.

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The Pragmatic Turn - Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science 18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum Bibliography Chapter link (url) [BibTex]

The Pragmatic Turn - Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science 18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum Bibliography Chapter link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning Action-Perception Cycles in Robotics: A Question of Representations and Embodiment

Bohg, J., Kragic, D.

In The Pragmatic Turn - Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science, 18, pages: 309-320, 18, Strüngmann Forum Reports, vol. 18, J. Lupp, series editor, (Editors: Andreas K. Engel and Karl J. Friston and Danica Kragic), The MIT Press, 18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum, May 2016 (incollection) In press

Abstract
Since the 1950s, robotics research has sought to build a general-purpose agent capable of autonomous, open-ended interaction with realistic, unconstrained environments. Cognition is perceived to be at the core of this process, yet understanding has been challenged because cognition is referred to differently within and across research areas, and is not clearly defined. The classic robotics approach is decomposition into functional modules which perform planning, reasoning, and problem-solving or provide input to these mechanisms. Although advancements have been made and numerous success stories reported in specific niches, this systems-engineering approach has not succeeded in building such a cognitive agent. The emergence of an action-oriented paradigm offers a new approach: action and perception are no longer separable into functional modules but must be considered in a complete loop. This chapter reviews work on different mechanisms for action- perception learning and discusses the role of embodiment in the design of the underlying representations and learning. It discusses the evaluation of agents and suggests the development of a new embodied Turing Test. Appropriate scenarios need to be devised in addition to current competitions, so that abilities can be tested over long time periods.

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18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum The Pragmatic Turn- Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science Bibliography Chapter link (url) [BibTex]

18th Ernst Strüngmann Forum The Pragmatic Turn- Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science Bibliography Chapter link (url) [BibTex]


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Special Issue on Causal Discovery and Inference

Zhang, K., Li, J., Bareinboim, E., Schölkopf, B., Pearl, J.

ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology (TIST), 7(2), January 2016, (Guest Editors) (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Empirical Inference (2010-2015)
Scientific Advisory Board Report, 2016 (misc)

ei

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Domain Adaptation in the Wild : Dealing with Asymmetric Label Set

Mittal, A., Raj, A., Namboodiri, V. P., Tuytelaars, T.

2016 (misc)

ei

Arxiv [BibTex]

Arxiv [BibTex]


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Nonlinear functional causal models for distinguishing cause from effect

Zhang, K., Hyvärinen, A.

In Statistics and Causality: Methods for Applied Empirical Research, pages: 185-201, 8, 1st, (Editors: Wolfgang Wiedermann and Alexander von Eye), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2016 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Perceiving Systems (2011-2015)
Scientific Advisory Board Report, 2016 (misc)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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A cognitive brain–computer interface for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Hohmann, M., Fomina, T., Jayaram, V., Widmann, N., Förster, C., Just, J., Synofzik, M., Schölkopf, B., Schöls, L., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

In Brain-Computer Interfaces: Lab Experiments to Real-World Applications, 228(Supplement C):221-239, 8, Progress in Brain Research, (Editors: Damien Coyle), Elsevier, 2016 (incollection)

ei

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Locally Weighted Regression for Control

Ting, J., Meier, F., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning and Data Mining, pages: 1-14, Springer US, Boston, MA, 2016 (inbook)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Extrapolation and learning equations

Martius, G., Lampert, C. H.

2016, arXiv preprint \url{https://arxiv.org/abs/1610.02995} (misc)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2009


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Text Clustering with Mixture of von Mises-Fisher Distributions

Sra, S., Banerjee, A., Ghosh, J., Dhillon, I.

In Text mining: classification, clustering, and applications, pages: 121-161, Chapman & Hall/CRC data mining and knowledge discovery series, (Editors: Srivastava, A. N. and Sahami, M.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA, June 2009 (inbook)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

2009


Web DOI [BibTex]


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Data Mining for Biologists

Tsuda, K.

In Biological Data Mining in Protein Interaction Networks, pages: 14-27, (Editors: Li, X. and Ng, S.-K.), Medical Information Science Reference, Hershey, PA, USA, May 2009 (inbook)

Abstract
In this tutorial chapter, we review basics about frequent pattern mining algorithms, including itemset mining, association rule mining and graph mining. These algorithms can find frequently appearing substructures in discrete data. They can discover structural motifs, for example, from mutation data, protein structures and chemical compounds. As they have been primarily used for business data, biological applications are not so common yet, but their potential impact would be large. Recent advances in computers including multicore machines and ever increasing memory capacity support the application of such methods to larger datasets. We explain technical aspects of the algorithms, but do not go into details. Current biological applications are summarized and possible future directions are given.

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Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Large Margin Methods for Part of Speech Tagging

Altun, Y.

In Automatic Speech and Speaker Recognition: Large Margin and Kernel Methods, pages: 141-160, (Editors: Keshet, J. and Bengio, S.), Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, USA, January 2009 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Covariate shift and local learning by distribution matching

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Huang, J., Schmittfull, M., Borgwardt, K., Schölkopf, B.

In Dataset Shift in Machine Learning, pages: 131-160, (Editors: Quiñonero-Candela, J., Sugiyama, M., Schwaighofer, A. and Lawrence, N. D.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2009 (inbook)

Abstract
Given sets of observations of training and test data, we consider the problem of re-weighting the training data such that its distribution more closely matches that of the test data. We achieve this goal by matching covariate distributions between training and test sets in a high dimensional feature space (specifically, a reproducing kernel Hilbert space). This approach does not require distribution estimation. Instead, the sample weights are obtained by a simple quadratic programming procedure. We provide a uniform convergence bound on the distance between the reweighted training feature mean and the test feature mean, a transductive bound on the expected loss of an algorithm trained on the reweighted data, and a connection to single class SVMs. While our method is designed to deal with the case of simple covariate shift (in the sense of Chapter ??), we have also found benefits for sample selection bias on the labels. Our correction procedure yields its greatest and most consistent advantages when the learning algorithm returns a classifier/regressor that is simpler" than the data might suggest.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Metal-Organic Frameworks

Panella, B., Hirscher, M.

In Encyclopedia of Electrochemical Power Sources, pages: 493-496, Elsevier, Amsterdam [et al.], 2009 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Carbon Materials

Hirscher, M.

In Encyclopedia of Electrochemical Power Sources, pages: 484-487, Elsevier, Amsterdam [et al.], 2009 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1995


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Batting a ball: Dynamics of a rhythmic skill

Sternad, D., Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G.

In Studies in Perception and Action, pages: 119-122, (Editors: Bardy, B.;Bostma, R.;Guiard, Y.), Erlbaum, Hillsdayle, NJ, 1995, clmc (inbook)

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[BibTex]

1995


[BibTex]