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2010


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Markerless tracking of Dynamic 3D Scans of Faces

Walder, C., Breidt, M., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B., Curio, C.

In Dynamic Faces: Insights from Experiments and Computation, pages: 255-276, (Editors: Curio, C., Bülthoff, H. H. and Giese, M. A.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2010 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

2010


Web [BibTex]


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Policy Gradient Methods

Peters, J., Bagnell, J.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, pages: 774-776, (Editors: Sammut, C. and Webb, G. I.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, December 2010 (inbook)

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Learning Continuous Grasp Affordances by Sensorimotor Exploration

Detry, R., Baseski, E., Popovic, M., Touati, Y., Krüger, N., Kroemer, O., Peters, J., Piater, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 451-465, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
We develop means of learning and representing object grasp affordances probabilistically. By grasp affordance, we refer to an entity that is able to assess whether a given relative object-gripper configuration will yield a stable grasp. These affordances are represented with grasp densities, continuous probability density functions defined on the space of 3D positions and orientations. Grasp densities are registered with a visual model of the object they characterize. They are exploited by aligning them to a target object using visual pose estimation. Grasp densities are refined through experience: A robot “plays” with an object by executing grasps drawn randomly for the object’s grasp density. The robot then uses the outcomes of these grasps to build a richer density through an importance sampling mechanism. Initial grasp densities, called hypothesis densities, are bootstrapped from grasps collected using a motion capture system, or from grasps generated from the visual model of the object. Refined densities, called empirical densities, represent affordances that have been confirmed through physical experience. The applicability of our method is demonstrated by producing empirical densities for two object with a real robot and its 3-finger hand. Hypothesis densities are created from visual cues and human demonstration.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Imitation and Reinforcement Learning for Motor Primitives with Perceptual Coupling

Kober, J., Mohler, B., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 209-225, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
Traditional motor primitive approaches deal largely with open-loop policies which can only deal with small perturbations. In this paper, we present a new type of motor primitive policies which serve as closed-loop policies together with an appropriate learning algorithm. Our new motor primitives are an augmented version version of the dynamical system-based motor primitives [Ijspeert et al(2002)Ijspeert, Nakanishi, and Schaal] that incorporates perceptual coupling to external variables. We show that these motor primitives can perform complex tasks such as Ball-in-a-Cup or Kendama task even with large variances in the initial conditions where a skilled human player would be challenged. We initialize the open-loop policies by imitation learning and the perceptual coupling with a handcrafted solution. We first improve the open-loop policies and subsequently the perceptual coupling using a novel reinforcement learning method which is particularly well-suited for dynamical system-based motor primitives.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots

Sigaud, O., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, pages: 1-12, Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 264, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
The number of advanced robot systems has been increasing in recent years yielding a large variety of versatile designs with many degrees of freedom. These robots have the potential of being applicable in uncertain tasks outside wellstructured industrial settings. However, the complexity of both systems and tasks is often beyond the reach of classical robot programming methods. As a result, a more autonomous solution for robot task acquisition is needed where robots adaptively adjust their behaviour to the encountered situations and required tasks. Learning approaches pose one of the most appealing ways to achieve this goal. However, while learning approaches are of high importance for robotics, we cannot simply use off-the-shelf methods from the machine learning community as these usually do not scale into the domains of robotics due to excessive computational cost as well as a lack of scalability. Instead, domain appropriate approaches are needed. In this book, we focus on several core domains of robot learning. For accurate task execution, we need motor learning capabilities. For fast learning of the motor tasks, imitation learning offers the most promising approach. Self improvement requires reinforcement learning approaches that scale into the domain of complex robots. Finally, for efficient interaction of humans with robot systems, we will need a form of interaction learning. This chapter provides a general introduction to these issues and briefly presents the contributions of the subsequent chapters to the corresponding research topics.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Real-Time Local GP Model Learning

Nguyen-Tuong, D., Seeger, M., Peters, J.

In From Motor Learning to Interaction Learning in Robots, 264, pages: 193-207, Studies in Computational Intelligence, (Editors: Sigaud, O. and Peters, J.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, January 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
For many applications in robotics, accurate dynamics models are essential. However, in some applications, e.g., in model-based tracking control, precise dynamics models cannot be obtained analytically for sufficiently complex robot systems. In such cases, machine learning offers a promising alternative for approximating the robot dynamics using measured data. However, standard regression methods such as Gaussian process regression (GPR) suffer from high computational complexity which prevents their usage for large numbers of samples or online learning to date. In this paper, we propose an approximation to the standard GPR using local Gaussian processes models inspired by [Vijayakumar et al(2005)Vijayakumar, D’Souza, and Schaal, Snelson and Ghahramani(2007)]. Due to reduced computational cost, local Gaussian processes (LGP) can be applied for larger sample-sizes and online learning. Comparisons with other nonparametric regressions, e.g., standard GPR, support vector regression (SVR) and locally weighted proje ction regression (LWPR), show that LGP has high approximation accuracy while being sufficiently fast for real-time online learning.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Machine Learning Methods for Automatic Image Colorization

Charpiat, G., Bezrukov, I., Hofmann, M., Altun, Y., Schölkopf, B.

In Computational Photography: Methods and Applications, pages: 395-418, Digital Imaging and Computer Vision, (Editors: Lukac, R.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
We aim to color greyscale images automatically, without any manual intervention. The color proposition could then be interactively corrected by user-provided color landmarks if necessary. Automatic colorization is nontrivial since there is usually no one-to-one correspondence between color and local texture. The contribution of our framework is that we deal directly with multimodality and estimate, for each pixel of the image to be colored, the probability distribution of all possible colors, instead of choosing the most probable color at the local level. We also predict the expected variation of color at each pixel, thus defining a non-uniform spatial coherency criterion. We then use graph cuts to maximize the probability of the whole colored image at the global level. We work in the L-a-b color space in order to approximate the human perception of distances between colors, and we use machine learning tools to extract as much information as possible from a dataset of colored examples. The resulting algorithm is fast, designed to be more robust to texture noise, and is above all able to deal with ambiguity, in contrary to previous approaches.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Approaches Based on Support Vector Machine to Classification of Remote Sensing Data

Bruzzone, L., Persello, C.

In Handbook of Pattern Recognition and Computer Vision, pages: 329-352, (Editors: Chen, C.H.), ICP, London, UK, 2010 (inbook)

Abstract
This chapter presents an extensive and critical review on the use of kernel methods and in particular of support vector machines (SVMs) in the classification of remote-sensing (RS) data. The chapter recalls the mathematical formulation and the main theoretical concepts related to SVMs, and discusses the motivations at the basis of the use of SVMs in remote sensing. A review on the main applications of SVMs in classification of remote sensing is given, presenting a literature survey on the use of SVMs for the analysis of different kinds of RS images. In addition, the most recent methodological developments related to SVM-based classification techniques in RS are illustrated by focusing on semisupervised, domain adaptation, and context sensitive approaches. Finally, the most promising research directions on SVM in RS are identified and discussed.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Distributed Online Learning of Central Pattern Generators in Modular Robots

Christensen, D. J., Spröwitz, A., Ijspeert, A. J.

In From Animals to Animats 11, 6226, pages: 402-412, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer, Berlin, 2010, author: Doncieux, Stéphan (incollection)

Abstract
In this paper we study distributed online learning of locomotion gaits for modular robots. The learning is based on a stochastic ap- proximation method, SPSA, which optimizes the parameters of coupled oscillators used to generate periodic actuation patterns. The strategy is implemented in a distributed fashion, based on a globally shared reward signal, but otherwise utilizing local communication only. In a physics-based simulation of modular Roombots robots we experiment with online learn- ing of gaits and study the effects of: module failures, different robot morphologies, and rough terrains. The experiments demonstrate fast online learning, typically 5-30 min. for convergence to high performing gaits (≈ 30 cm/sec), despite high numbers of open parameters (45-54). We conclude that the proposed approach is efficient, effective and a promising candidate for online learning on many other robotic platforms.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Nanohandling robot cells

Fatikow, Sergej, Wich, Thomas, Dahmen, Christian, Jasper, Daniel, Stolle, Christian, Eichhorn, Volkmar, Hagemann, Saskia, Weigel-Jech, Michael

In Handbook of Nanophysics: Nanomedicine and Nanorobotics, pages: 1-31, CRC Press, 2010 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Locally weighted regression for control

Ting, J., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, pages: 613-624, (Editors: Sammut, C.;Webb, G. I.), Springer, 2010, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
This is article addresses two topics: learning control and locally weighted regression.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Physisorption in porous materials

Hirscher, M., Panella, B.

In Handbook of Hydrogen Storage, pages: 39-62, WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2010 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Adsorption technologies

Schmitz, B., Hirscher, M.

In Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, pages: 431-445, WILEY-VCH, Weinheim, 2010 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Atomic-Force-Microscopy-Based Nanomanipulation Systems

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

In Handbook of Nanophysics: Nanomedicine and Nanorobotics, pages: 1-15, CRC Press, 2010 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Taming the Beast: Guided Self-organization of Behavior in Autonomous Robots

Martius, G., Herrmann, J. M.

In From Animals to Animats 11, 6226, pages: 50-61, LNCS, Springer, 2010 (incollection)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2007


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Support Vector Machine Learning for Interdependent and Structured Output Spaces

Altun, Y., Hofmann, T., Tsochantaridis, I.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 85-104, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: Bakir, G. H. , T. Hofmann, B. Schölkopf, A. J. Smola, B. Taskar, S. V. N. Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

2007


Web [BibTex]


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Brisk Kernel ICA

Jegelka, S., Gretton, A.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 225-250, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
Recent approaches to independent component analysis have used kernel independence measures to obtain very good performance in ICA, particularly in areas where classical methods experience difficulty (for instance, sources with near-zero kurtosis). In this chapter, we compare two efficient extensions of these methods for large-scale problems: random subsampling of entries in the Gram matrices used in defining the independence measures, and incomplete Cholesky decomposition of these matrices. We derive closed-form, efficiently computable approximations for the gradients of these measures, and compare their performance on ICA using both artificial and music data. We show that kernel ICA can scale up to much larger problems than yet attempted, and that incomplete Cholesky decomposition performs better than random sampling.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Training a Support Vector Machine in the Primal

Chapelle, O.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 29-50, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007, This is a slightly updated version of the Neural Computation paper (inbook)

Abstract
Most literature on Support Vector Machines (SVMs) concentrate on the dual optimization problem. In this paper, we would like to point out that the primal problem can also be solved efficiently, both for linear and non-linear SVMs, and that there is no reason to ignore this possibility. On the contrary, from the primal point of view new families of algorithms for large scale SVM training can be investigated.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Approximation Methods for Gaussian Process Regression

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Rasmussen, CE., Williams, CKI.

In Large-Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 203-223, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
A wealth of computationally efficient approximation methods for Gaussian process regression have been recently proposed. We give a unifying overview of sparse approximations, following Quiñonero-Candela and Rasmussen (2005), and a brief review of approximate matrix-vector multiplication methods.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Density Estimation of Structured Outputs in Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces

Altun, Y., Smola, A.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 283-300, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: BakIr, G. H., T. Hofmann, B. Schölkopf, A. J. Smola, B. Taskar, S. V.N. Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
In this paper we study the problem of estimating conditional probability distributions for structured output prediction tasks in Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces. More specically, we prove decomposition results for undirected graphical models, give constructions for kernels, and show connections to Gaussian Process classi- cation. Finally we present ecient means of solving the optimization problem and apply this to label sequence learning. Experiments on named entity recognition and pitch accent prediction tasks demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Trading Convexity for Scalability

Collobert, R., Sinz, F., Weston, J., Bottou, L.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 275-300, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
Convex learning algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are often seen as highly desirable because they offer strong practical properties and are amenable to theoretical analysis. However, in this work we show how nonconvexity can provide scalability advantages over convexity. We show how concave-convex programming can be applied to produce (i) faster SVMs where training errors are no longer support vectors, and (ii) much faster Transductive SVMs.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Classifying Event-Related Desynchronization in EEG, ECoG and MEG signals

Hill, N., Lal, T., Tangermann, M., Hinterberger, T., Widman, G., Elger, C., Schölkopf, B., Birbaumer, N.

In Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing, pages: 235-260, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: G Dornhege and J del R Millán and T Hinterberger and DJ McFarland and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Joint Kernel Maps

Weston, J., Bakir, G., Bousquet, O., Mann, T., Noble, W., Schölkopf, B.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 67-84, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: GH Bakir and T Hofmann and B Schölkopf and AJ Smola and B Taskar and SVN Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Brain-Computer Interfaces for Communication in Paralysis: A Clinical Experimental Approach

Hinterberger, T., Nijboer, F., Kübler, A., Matuz, T., Furdea, A., Mochty, U., Jordan, M., Lal, T., Hill, J., Mellinger, J., Bensch, M., Tangermann, M., Widman, G., Elger, C., Rosenstiel, W., Schölkopf, B., Birbaumer, N.

In Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing, pages: 43-64, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: G. Dornhege and J del R Millán and T Hinterberger and DJ McFarland and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Structure Calculation

Rieping, W., Habeck, M., Nilges, M.

In Structure and Biophysics: New Technologies for Current Challenges in Biology and Beyond, pages: 81-98, NATO Security through Science Series, (Editors: Puglisi, J. D.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, March 2007 (inbook)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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On the Pre-Image Problem in Kernel Methods

BakIr, G., Schölkopf, B., Weston, J.

In Kernel Methods in Bioengineering, Signal and Image Processing, pages: 284-302, (Editors: G Camps-Valls and JL Rojo-Álvarez and M Martínez-Ramón), Idea Group Publishing, Hershey, PA, USA, January 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
In this chapter we are concerned with the problem of reconstructing patterns from their representation in feature space, known as the pre-image problem. We review existing algorithms and propose a learning based approach. All algorithms are discussed regarding their usability and complexity and evaluated on an image denoising application.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Some comments on ν-SVM

Dinuzzo, F., De Nicolao, G.

In A tribute to Antonio Lepschy, pages: -, (Editors: Picci, G. , M. E. Valcher), Edizione Libreria Progetto, Padova, Italy, 2007 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Probabilistically modeling and decoding neural population activity in motor cortex

Black, M. J., Donoghue, J. P.

In Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing, pages: 147-159, (Editors: Dornhege, G. and del R. Millan, J. and Hinterberger, T. and McFarland, D. and Muller, K.-R.), MIT Press, London, 2007 (incollection)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Dynamics systems vs. optimal control ? a unifying view

Schaal, S, Mohajerian, P., Ijspeert, A.

In Progress in Brain Research, (165):425-445, 2007, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
In the past, computational motor control has been approached from at least two major frameworks: the dynamic systems approach and the viewpoint of optimal control. The dynamic system approach emphasizes motor control as a process of self-organization between an animal and its environment. Nonlinear differential equations that can model entrainment and synchronization behavior are among the most favorable tools of dynamic systems modelers. In contrast, optimal control approaches view motor control as the evolutionary or development result of a nervous system that tries to optimize rather general organizational principles, e.g., energy consumption or accurate task achievement. Optimal control theory is usually employed to develop appropriate theories. Interestingly, there is rather little interaction between dynamic systems and optimal control modelers as the two approaches follow rather different philosophies and are often viewed as diametrically opposing. In this paper, we develop a computational approach to motor control that offers a unifying modeling framework for both dynamic systems and optimal control approaches. In discussions of several behavioral experiments and some theoretical and robotics studies, we demonstrate how our computational ideas allow both the representation of self-organizing processes and the optimization of movement based on reward criteria. Our modeling framework is rather simple and general, and opens opportunities to revisit many previous modeling results from this novel unifying view.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Bacteria integrated swimming microrobots

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

In 50 years of artificial intelligence, pages: 154-163, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Micromagnetism-microstructure relations and the hysteresis loop

Goll, D.

In Handbook of Magnetism and Advanced Magnetic Materials. Vol. 2: Micromagnetism, pages: 1023-1058, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2007 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Synchrotron radiation techniques based on X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

Schütz, G., Goering, E., Stoll, H.

In Handbook of Magnetism and Advanced Magnetic Materials. Vol. 3: Materials Novel Techniques for Characterizing and Preparing Samples, pages: 1311-1363, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2007 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Micromagnetism-microstructure relations and the hysteresis loop

Goll, D.

In Handbook of Magnetism and Advanced Magnetic Materials. Vol. 2: Micromagnetism, pages: 1023-1058, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2007 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dissipative magnetization dynamics close to the adiabatic regime

Fähnle, M., Steiauf, D.

In Handbook of Magnetism and Advanced Magnetic Materials. Vol. 1: Fundamental and Theory, pages: 282-302, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2007 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]