Header logo is


1994


Thumb xl cviu
A computational and evolutionary perspective on the role of representation in computer vision

Tarr, M. J., Black, M. J.

CVGIP: Image Understanding, 60(1):65-73, July 1994 (article)

Abstract
Recently, the assumed goal of computer vision, reconstructing a representation of the scene, has been critcized as unproductive and impractical. Critics have suggested that the reconstructive approach should be supplanted by a new purposive approach that emphasizes functionality and task driven perception at the cost of general vision. In response to these arguments, we claim that the recovery paradigm central to the reconstructive approach is viable, and, moreover, provides a promising framework for understanding and modeling general purpose vision in humans and machines. An examination of the goals of vision from an evolutionary perspective and a case study involving the recovery of optic flow support this hypothesis. In particular, while we acknowledge that there are instances where the purposive approach may be appropriate, these are insufficient for implementing the wide range of visual tasks exhibited by humans (the kind of flexible vision system presumed to be an end-goal of artificial intelligence). Furthermore, there are instances, such as recent work on the estimation of optic flow, where the recovery paradigm may yield useful and robust results. Thus, contrary to certain claims, the purposive approach does not obviate the need for recovery and reconstruction of flexible representations of the world.

ps

pdf [BibTex]

1994


pdf [BibTex]


Thumb xl cviu
Reconstruction and purpose

Tarr, M. J., Black, M. J.

CVGIP: Image Understanding, 60(1):113-118, July 1994 (article)

ps

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Raman and Infrared-Spectra of Solid Chloroflouromethane

Schlueter, S., Davison, T., Anderson, A.

Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, 25, pages: 429-433, 1994 (article)

Abstract
Raman and infrared spectra of solid CH2CIF (Freon 31) were recorded in both the lattice and internal mode regions for samples at temperatures between 12 and 125 K. No evidence of any solid-state phase transition was found, but some thin-film samples deposited at low temperatures appear to exist in a metastable phase. Spectra of the stable phase are compatible with a non-centrosymmetric unit cell containing four molecules. Lattice peaks are assigned on the basis of geometrical and intensity arguments.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Pruning from Adaptive Regularization

Hansen, LK., Rasmussen, CE.

Neural Computation, 6(6):1222-1231, 1994 (article)

Abstract
Inspired by the recent upsurge of interest in Bayesian methods we consider adaptive regularization. A generalization based scheme for adaptation of regularization parameters is introduced and compared to Bayesian regularization.We show that pruning arises naturally within both adaptive regularization schemes. As model example we have chosen the simplest possible: estimating the mean of a random variable with known variance. Marked similarities are found between the two methods in that they both involve a "noise limit", below which they regularize with infinite weight decay, i.e., they prune.However, pruning is not always beneficial. We show explicitly that both methods in some cases may increase the generalization error. This corresponds to situations where the underlying assumptions of the regularizer are poorly matched to the environment.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


no image
Robot juggling: An implementation of memory-based learning

Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G.

Control Systems Magazine, 14(1):57-71, 1994, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper explores issues involved in implementing robot learning for a challenging dynamic task, using a case study from robot juggling. We use a memory-based local modeling approach (locally weighted regression) to represent a learned model of the task to be performed. Statistical tests are given to examine the uncertainty of a model, to optimize its prediction quality, and to deal with noisy and corrupted data. We develop an exploration algorithm that explicitly deals with prediction accuracy requirements during exploration. Using all these ingredients in combination with methods from optimal control, our robot achieves fast real-time learning of the task within 40 to 100 trials.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
In vivo diabetic wound healing with nanofibrous scaffolds modified with gentamicin and recombinant human epidermal growth factor

Dwivedi, C., Pandey, I., Pandey, H., Patil, S., Mishra, S. B., Pandey, A. C., Zamboni, P., Ramteke, P. W., Singh, A. V.

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 106(3):641-651, March (article)

Abstract
Abstract Diabetic wounds are susceptible to microbial infection. The treatment of these wounds requires a higher payload of growth factors. With this in mind, the strategy for this study was to utilize a novel payload comprising of Eudragit RL/RS 100 nanofibers carrying the bacterial inhibitor gentamicin sulfate (GS) in concert with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF); an accelerator of wound healing. GS containing Eudragit was electrospun to yield nanofiber scaffolds, which were further modified by covalent immobilization of rhEGF to their surface. This novel fabricated nanoscaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X‐ray diffraction. The thermal behavior of the nanoscaffold was determined using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. In the in vitro antibacterial assays, the nanoscaffolds exhibited comparable antibacterial activity to pure gentemicin powder. In vivo work using female C57/BL6 mice, the nanoscaffolds induced faster wound healing activity in dorsal wounds compared to the control. The paradigm in this study presents a robust in vivo model to enhance the applicability of drug delivery systems in wound healing applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 641–651, 2018.

pi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl gpcr cons
Classified Regression for Bayesian Optimization: Robot Learning with Unknown Penalties

Marco, A., Baumann, D., Hennig, P., Trimpe, S.

Submitted to Journal (under review) (article)

Abstract
Learning robot controllers by minimizing a black-box objective cost using Bayesian optimization (BO) can be time-consuming and challenging. It is very often the case that some roll-outs result in failure behaviors, causing premature experiment detention. In such cases, the designer is forced to decide on heuristic cost penalties because the acquired data is often scarce, or not comparable with that of the stable policies. To overcome this, we propose a Bayesian model that captures exactly what we know about the cost of unstable controllers prior to data collection: Nothing, except that it should be a somewhat large number. The resulting Bayesian model, approximated with a Gaussian process, predicts high cost values in regions where failures are likely to occur. In this way, the model guides the BO exploration toward regions of stability. We demonstrate the benefits of the proposed model in several illustrative and statistical synthetic benchmarks, and also in experiments on a real robotic platform. In addition, we propose and experimentally validate a new BO method to account for unknown constraints. Such method is an extension of Max-Value Entropy Search, a recent information-theoretic method, to solve unconstrained global optimization problems.

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


no image
test
(article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Robotics Research

Tong, Chi Hay, Furgale, Paul, Barfoot, Timothy D, Guizilini, Vitor, Ramos, Fabio, Chen, Yushan, T\uumová, Jana, Ulusoy, Alphan, Belta, Calin, Tenorth, Moritz, others

(article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]