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2016


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Qualitative User Reactions to a Hand-Clapping Humanoid Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 317-327, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

2016


[BibTex]


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Designing and Assessing Expressive Open-Source Faces for the Baxter Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 340-350, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Rhythmic Timing in Playful Human-Robot Social Motor Coordination

Fitter, N. T., Hawkes, D. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 296-305, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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An electro-active polymer based lens module for dynamically varying focal system

Yun, S., Park, S., Nam, S., Park, B., Park, S. K., Mun, S., Lim, J. M., Kyung, K.

Applied Physics Letters, 109(14):141908, October 2016 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate a polymer-based active-lens module allowing a dynamic focus controllable optical system with a wide tunable range. The active-lens module is composed of parallelized two active- lenses with a convex and a concave shaped hemispherical lens structure, respectively. Under opera- tion with dynamic input voltage signals, each active-lens produces translational movement bi-directionally responding to a hybrid driving force that is a combination of an electro-active response of a thin dielectric elastomer membrane and an electro-static attraction force. Since the proposed active lens module widely modulates a gap-distance between lens-elements, an optical system based on the active-lens module provides widely-variable focusing for selective imaging of objects in arbitrary position.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Using IMU Data to Demonstrate Hand-Clapping Games to a Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 851 - 856, October 2016, Interactive presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Wrinkle structures formed by formulating UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers

Park, S. K., Kwark, Y., Nam, S., Park, S., Park, B., Yun, S., Moon, J., Lee, J., Yu, B., Kyung, K.

Polymer, 99, pages: 447-452, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Artificial wrinkles have recently been in the spotlight due to their potential use in high-tech applications. A spontaneously wrinkled film can be fabricated from UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers. Here, we controlled the wrinkle formation by simply formulating two UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers, tetraethylene glycol bis(4-ethenyl-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl) ether (TEGDSt) and tetraethylene glycol diacrylate (TEGDA). The wrinkles were formed from the TEGDSt/TEGDA formulated prepolymer layers containing up to 30 wt% of TEGDA. The wrinkle formation depended upon the rate of photo-crosslinking reaction of the formulated prepolymers. The first order apparent rate constant, kapp, was between ca. 5.7 × 10−3 and 12.2 × 10−3 s−1 for the wrinkle formation. The wrinkle structures were modulated within the kapp mainly due to variation in the extent of shrinkage of the formulated prepolymer layers with the content of TEGDA

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Numerical Investigation of Frictional Forces Between a Finger and a Textured Surface During Active Touch

Khojasteh, B., Janko, M., Visell, Y.

Extended abstract presented in form of an oral presentation at the 3rd International Conference on BioTribology (ICoBT), London, England, September 2016 (misc)

Abstract
The biomechanics of the human finger pad has been investigated in relation to motor behaviour and sensory function in the upper limb. While the frictional properties of the finger pad are important for grip and grasp function, recent attention has also been given to the roles played by friction when perceiving a surface via sliding contact. Indeed, the mechanics of sliding contact greatly affect stimuli felt by the finger scanning a surface. Past research has shed light on neural mechanisms of haptic texture perception, but the relation with time-resolved frictional contact interactions is unknown. Current biotribological models cannot predict time-resolved frictional forces felt by a finger as it slides on a rough surface. This constitutes a missing link in understanding the mechanical basis of texture perception. To ameliorate this, we developed a two-dimensional finite element numerical simulation of a human finger pad in sliding contact with a textured surface. Our model captures bulk mechanical properties, including hyperelasticity, dissipation, and tissue heterogeneity, and contact dynamics. To validate it, we utilized a database of measurements that we previously captured with a variety of human fingers and surfaces. By designing the simulations to match the measurements, we evaluated the ability of the FEM model to predict time-resolved sliding frictional forces. We varied surface texture wavelength, sliding speed, and normal forces in the experiments. An analysis of the results indicated that both time- and frequency-domain features of forces produced during finger-surface sliding interactions were reproduced, including many of the phenomena that we observed in analyses of real measurements, including quasiperiodicity, harmonic distortion and spectral decay in the frequency domain, and their dependence on kinetics and surface properties. The results shed light on frictional signatures of surface texture during active touch, and may inform understanding of the role played by friction in texture discrimination.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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ProtonPack: A Visuo-Haptic Data Acquisition System for Robotic Learning of Surface Properties

Burka, A., Hu, S., Helgeson, S., Krishnan, S., Gao, Y., Hendricks, L. A., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Multisensor Fusion and Integration for Intelligent Systems (MFI), pages: 58-65, 2016, Oral presentation given by Burka (inproceedings)

hi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Equipping the Baxter Robot with Human-Inspired Hand-Clapping Skills

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), pages: 105-112, 2016 (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl romo and mini
Behavioral Learning and Imitation for Music-Based Robotic Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Burns, R., Nizambad, S., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

Workshop paper (5 pages) at the RO-MAN Workshop on Behavior Adaptation, Interaction and Learning for Assistive Robotics, August 2016 (misc)

Abstract
In this full workshop paper, we discuss the positive impacts of robot, music, and imitation therapies on children with autism. We also discuss the use of Laban Motion Analysis (LMA) to identify emotion through movement and posture cues. We present our preliminary studies of the "Five Senses" game that our two robots, Romo the penguin and Darwin Mini, partake in. Using an LMA-focused approach (enabled by our skeletal tracking Kinect algorithm), we find that our participants show increased frequency of movement and speed when the game has a musical accompaniment. Therefore, participants may have increased engagement with our robots and game if music is present. We also begin exploring motion learning for future works.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Reproducing a Laser Pointer Dot on a Secondary Projected Screen

Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM), pages: 1645-1650, 2016, Oral presentation given by Hu (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design and evaluation of a novel mechanical device to improve hemiparetic gait: a case report

Fjeld, K., Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Vasudevan, E. V.

Extended abstract presented at the Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement Conference (BANCOM), 2016, Poster presentation given by Fjeld (misc)

hi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl screen shot 2018 10 09 at 11.42.49
Active Uncertainty Calibration in Bayesian ODE Solvers

Kersting, H., Hennig, P.

Proceedings of the 32nd Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), pages: 309-318, (Editors: Ihler, A. and Janzing, D.), AUAI Press, June 2016 (conference)

Abstract
There is resurging interest, in statistics and machine learning, in solvers for ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that return probability measures instead of point estimates. Recently, Conrad et al.~introduced a sampling-based class of methods that are `well-calibrated' in a specific sense. But the computational cost of these methods is significantly above that of classic methods. On the other hand, Schober et al.~pointed out a precise connection between classic Runge-Kutta ODE solvers and Gaussian filters, which gives only a rough probabilistic calibration, but at negligible cost overhead. By formulating the solution of ODEs as approximate inference in linear Gaussian SDEs, we investigate a range of probabilistic ODE solvers, that bridge the trade-off between computational cost and probabilistic calibration, and identify the inaccurate gradient measurement as the crucial source of uncertainty. We propose the novel filtering-based method Bayesian Quadrature filtering (BQF) which uses Bayesian quadrature to actively learn the imprecision in the gradient measurement by collecting multiple gradient evaluations.

ei pn

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl screen shot 2016 01 19 at 14.48.37
Automatic LQR Tuning Based on Gaussian Process Global Optimization

Marco, A., Hennig, P., Bohg, J., Schaal, S., Trimpe, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 270-277, IEEE, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper proposes an automatic controller tuning framework based on linear optimal control combined with Bayesian optimization. With this framework, an initial set of controller gains is automatically improved according to a pre-defined performance objective evaluated from experimental data. The underlying Bayesian optimization algorithm is Entropy Search, which represents the latent objective as a Gaussian process and constructs an explicit belief over the location of the objective minimum. This is used to maximize the information gain from each experimental evaluation. Thus, this framework shall yield improved controllers with fewer evaluations compared to alternative approaches. A seven-degree- of-freedom robot arm balancing an inverted pole is used as the experimental demonstrator. Results of a two- and four- dimensional tuning problems highlight the method’s potential for automatic controller tuning on robotic platforms.

am ics pn

Video PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Video PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Batch Bayesian Optimization via Local Penalization

González, J., Dai, Z., Hennig, P., Lawrence, N.

Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 51, pages: 648-657, JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings, (Editors: Gretton, A. and Robert, C. C.), May 2016 (conference)

ei pn

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Approximate Least-Squares

Bartels, S., Hennig, P.

Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 51, pages: 676-684, JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings, (Editors: Gretton, A. and Robert, C. C. ), May 2016 (conference)

Abstract
Least-squares and kernel-ridge / Gaussian process regression are among the foundational algorithms of statistics and machine learning. Famously, the worst-case cost of exact nonparametric regression grows cubically with the data-set size; but a growing number of approximations have been developed that estimate good solutions at lower cost. These algorithms typically return point estimators, without measures of uncertainty. Leveraging recent results casting elementary linear algebra operations as probabilistic inference, we propose a new approximate method for nonparametric least-squares that affords a probabilistic uncertainty estimate over the error between the approximate and exact least-squares solution (this is not the same as the posterior variance of the associated Gaussian process regressor). This allows estimating the error of the least-squares solution on a subset of the data relative to the full-data solution. The uncertainty can be used to control the computational effort invested in the approximation. Our algorithm has linear cost in the data-set size, and a simple formal form, so that it can be implemented with a few lines of code in programming languages with linear algebra functionality.

ei pn

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Deep Learning for Tactile Understanding From Visual and Haptic Data

Gao, Y., Hendricks, L. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Darrell, T.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 536-543, May 2016, Oral presentation given by Gao (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robust Tactile Perception of Artificial Tumors Using Pairwise Comparisons of Sensor Array Readings

Hui, J. C. T., Block, A. E., Taylor, C. J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 305-312, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, April 2016, Oral presentation given by Hui (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Data-Driven Comparison of Four Cutaneous Displays for Pinching Palpation in Robotic Surgery

Brown, J. D., Ibrahim, M., Chase, E. D. Z., Pacchierotti, C., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 147-154, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, April 2016, Oral presentation given by Brown (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl romo breakdown
Multisensory Robotic Therapy through Motion Capture and Imitation for Children with ASD

Burns, R., Nizambad, S., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education, Mid-Atlantic Section, Spring Conference, April 2016 (conference)

Abstract
It is known that children with autism have difficulty with emotional communication. As the population of children with autism increases, it is crucial we create effective therapeutic programs that will improve their communication skills. We present an interactive robotic system that delivers emotional and social behaviors for multi­sensory therapy for children with autism spectrum disorders. Our framework includes emotion­-based robotic gestures and facial expressions, as well as tracking and understanding the child’s responses through Kinect motion capture.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Design and Implementation of a Visuo-Haptic Data Acquisition System for Robotic Learning of Surface Properties

Burka, A., Hu, S., Helgeson, S., Krishnan, S., Gao, Y., Hendricks, L. A., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 350-352, April 2016, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Burka (inproceedings)

hi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Objective assessment of robotic surgical skill using instrument contact vibrations

Gomez, E. D., Aggarwal, R., McMahan, W., Bark, K., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 30(4):1419-1431, 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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One Sensor, Three Displays: A Comparison of Tactile Rendering from a BioTac Sensor

Brown, J. D., Ibrahim, M., Chase, E. D. Z., Pacchierotti, C., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, April 2016 (misc)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl angry romo
Multisensory robotic therapy to promote natural emotional interaction for children with ASD

Burns, R., Azzi, P., Spadafora, M., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Kim, H. J., Lee, J., Raihan, K., Howard, A.

Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction (HRI), pages: 571-571, March 2016 (conference)

Abstract
In this video submission, we are introduced to two robots, Romo the penguin and Darwin Mini. We have programmed these robots to perform a variety of emotions through facial expression and body language, respectively. We aim to use these robots with children with autism, to demo safe emotional and social responses in various sensory situations.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl interactive
Interactive Robotic Framework for Multi-Sensory Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Burns, R., Park, C. H., Kim, H. J., Lee, J., Rennie, A., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

In Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction (HRI), pages: 421-422, March 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this abstract, we present the overarching goal of our interactive robotic framework - to teach emotional and social behavior to children with autism spectrum disorders via multi-sensory therapy. We introduce our robot characters, Romo and Darwin Mini, and the "Five Senses" scenario they will undergo. This sensory game will develop the children's interest, and will model safe and appropriate reactions to typical sensory overload stimuli.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Cutaneous Feedback of Fingertip Deformation and Vibration for Palpation in Robotic Surgery

Pacchierotti, C., Prattichizzo, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 63(2):278-287, February 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control

Nam, S., Park, S., Yun, S., Park, B., Park, S. K., Kyung, K.

Optics Express, 24(1):55-66, OSA, January 2016 (article)

Abstract
We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl cloud tracking
Gaussian Process-Based Predictive Control for Periodic Error Correction

Klenske, E. D., Zeilinger, M., Schölkopf, B., Hennig, P.

IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology , 24(1):110-121, 2016 (article)

ei pn

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Designing Human-Robot Exercise Games for Baxter

Fitter, N. T., Hawkes, D. T., Johnson, M. J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

2016, Late-breaking results report presented at the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) (misc)

hi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Dual Control for Approximate Bayesian Reinforcement Learning

Klenske, E. D., Hennig, P.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 17(127):1-30, 2016 (article)

ei pn

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Psychophysical Power Optimization of Friction Modulation for Tactile Interfaces

Sednaoui, T., Vezzoli, E., Gueorguiev, D., Amberg, M., Chappaz, C., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In Haptics: Perception, Devices, Control, and Applications, pages: 354-362, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Ultrasonic vibration and electrovibration can modulate the friction between a surface and a sliding finger. The power consumption of these devices is critical to their integration in modern mobile devices such as smartphones. This paper presents a simple control solution to reduce up to 68.8 {\%} this power consumption by taking advantage of the human perception limits.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Thumb xl screen shot 2018 05 04 at 11.40.29
Effect of Waveform in Haptic Perception of Electrovibration on Touchscreens

Vardar, Y., Güçlü, B., Basdogan, C.

In Haptics: Perception, Devices, Control, and Applications, pages: 190-203, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The perceived intensity of electrovibration can be altered by modulating the amplitude, frequency, and waveform of the input voltage signal applied to the conductive layer of a touchscreen. Even though the effect of the first two has been already investigated for sinusoidal signals, we are not aware of any detailed study investigating the effect of the waveform on our haptic perception in the domain of electrovibration. This paper investigates how input voltage waveform affects our haptic perception of electrovibration on touchscreens. We conducted absolute detection experiments using square wave and sinusoidal input signals at seven fundamental frequencies (15, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 and 1920 Hz). Experimental results depicted the well-known U-shaped tactile sensitivity across frequencies. However, the sensory thresholds were lower for the square wave than the sinusoidal wave at fundamental frequencies less than 60 Hz while they were similar at higher frequencies. Using an equivalent circuit model of a finger-touchscreen system, we show that the sensation difference between the waveforms at low fundamental frequencies can be explained by frequency-dependent electrical properties of human skin and the differential sensitivity of mechanoreceptor channels to individual frequency components in the electrostatic force. As a matter of fact, when the electrostatic force waveforms are analyzed in the frequency domain based on human vibrotactile sensitivity data from the literature [15], the electrovibration stimuli caused by square-wave input signals at all the tested frequencies in this study are found to be detected by the Pacinian psychophysical channel.

hi

vardar_eurohaptics_2016 [BibTex]

vardar_eurohaptics_2016 [BibTex]


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Peripheral vs. central determinants of vibrotactile adaptation

Klöcker, A., Gueorguiev, D., Thonnard, J. L., Mouraux, A.

Journal of Neurophysiology, 115(2):685-691, 2016, PMID: 26581868 (article)

Abstract
Long-lasting mechanical vibrations applied to the skin induce a reversible decrease in the perception of vibration at the stimulated skin site. This phenomenon of vibrotactile adaptation has been studied extensively, yet there is still no clear consensus on the mechanisms leading to vibrotactile adaptation. In particular, the respective contributions of 1) changes affecting mechanical skin impedance, 2) peripheral processes, and 3) central processes are largely unknown. Here we used direct electrical stimulation of nerve fibers to bypass mechanical transduction processes and thereby explore the possible contribution of central vs. peripheral processes to vibrotactile adaptation. Three experiments were conducted. In the first, adaptation was induced with mechanical vibration of the fingertip (51- or 251-Hz vibration delivered for 8 min, at 40× detection threshold). In the second, we attempted to induce adaptation with transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the median nerve (51- or 251-Hz constant-current pulses delivered for 8 min, at 1.5× detection threshold). Vibrotactile detection thresholds were measured before and after adaptation. Mechanical stimulation induced a clear increase of vibrotactile detection thresholds. In contrast, thresholds were unaffected by electrical stimulation. In the third experiment, we assessed the effect of mechanical adaptation on the detection thresholds to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimuli, measured before and after adaptation. Electrical detection thresholds were unaffected by the mechanical adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that vibrotactile adaptation is predominantly the consequence of peripheral mechanoreceptor processes and/or changes in biomechanical properties of the skin.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Silent Expectations: Dynamic Causal Modeling of Cortical Prediction and Attention to Sounds That Weren’t

Chennu, S., Noreika, V., Gueorguiev, D., Shtyrov, Y., Bekinschtein, T. A., Henson, R.

Journal of Neuroscience, 36(32):8305-8316, Society for Neuroscience, 2016 (article)

Abstract
There is increasing evidence that human perception is realized by a hierarchy of neural processes in which predictions sent backward from higher levels result in prediction errors that are fed forward from lower levels, to update the current model of the environment. Moreover, the precision of prediction errors is thought to be modulated by attention. Much of this evidence comes from paradigms in which a stimulus differs from that predicted by the recent history of other stimuli (generating a so-called {\textquotedblleft}mismatch response{\textquotedblright}). There is less evidence from situations where a prediction is not fulfilled by any sensory input (an {\textquotedblleft}omission{\textquotedblright} response). This situation arguably provides a more direct measure of {\textquotedblleft}top-down{\textquotedblright} predictions in the absence of confounding {\textquotedblleft}bottom-up{\textquotedblright} input. We applied Dynamic Causal Modeling of evoked electromagnetic responses recorded by EEG and MEG to an auditory paradigm in which we factorially crossed the presence versus absence of {\textquotedblleft}bottom-up{\textquotedblright} stimuli with the presence versus absence of {\textquotedblleft}top-down{\textquotedblright} attention. Model comparison revealed that both mismatch and omission responses were mediated by increased forward and backward connections, differing primarily in the driving input. In both responses, modeling results suggested that the presence of attention selectively modulated backward {\textquotedblleft}prediction{\textquotedblright} connections. Our results provide new model-driven evidence of the pure top-down prediction signal posited in theories of hierarchical perception, and highlight the role of attentional precision in strengthening this prediction.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human auditory perception is thought to be realized by a network of neurons that maintain a model of and predict future stimuli. Much of the evidence for this comes from experiments where a stimulus unexpectedly differs from previous ones, which generates a well-known {\textquotedblleft}mismatch response.{\textquotedblright} But what happens when a stimulus is unexpectedly omitted altogether? By measuring the brain{\textquoteright}s electromagnetic activity, we show that it also generates an {\textquotedblleft}omission response{\textquotedblright} that is contingent on the presence of attention. We model these responses computationally, revealing that mismatch and omission responses only differ in the location of inputs into the same underlying neuronal network. In both cases, we show that attention selectively strengthens the brain{\textquoteright}s prediction of the future.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Touch uses frictional cues to discriminate flat materials

Gueorguiev, D., Bochereau, S., Mouraux, A., Hayward, V., Thonnard, J.

Scientific reports, 6, pages: 25553, Nature Publishing Group, 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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IMU-Mediated Real-Time Human-Baxter Hand-Clapping Interaction

Fitter, N. T., Huang, Y. E., Mayer, J. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

2016, Late-breaking results report presented at the {\em IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems} (misc)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2006


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Induced Master Motion in Force-Reflecting Teleoperation

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Niemeyer, G.

ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, 128(4):800-810, December 2006 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

2006


[BibTex]


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Improving Telerobotic Touch Via High-Frequency Acceleration Matching

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Niemeyer, G.

In Proc. IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 3893-3898, Orlando, Florida, USA, May 2006, Oral presentation given by Kuchenbecker (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Event-Based Haptic Tapping with Grip Force Compensation

Fiene, J. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Niemeyer, G.

In Proc. IEEE Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, pages: 117-123, Arlington, Virginia, USA, March 2006, Oral presentation given by Fiene (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Improving Contact Realism Through Event-Based Haptic Feedback

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Fiene, J. P., Niemeyer, G.

IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 12(2):219-230, March 2006 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]