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2018


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Multi-objective Optimization of Nonconventional Laminated Composite Panels

Serhat, G.

Koc University, October 2018 (phdthesis)

Abstract
Laminated composite panels are extensively used in various industries due to their high stiffness-to-weight ratio and directional properties that allow optimization of stiffness characteristics for specific applications. With the recent improvements in the manufacturing techniques, the technology trend has been shifting towards the development of nonconventional composites. This work aims to develop new methods for the design and optimization of nonconventional laminated composites. Lamination parameters method is used to characterize laminate stiffness matrices in a compact form. An optimization framework based on finite element analysis was developed to calculate the solutions for different panel geometries, boundary conditions and load cases. The first part of the work addresses the multi-objective optimization of composite laminates to maximize dynamic and load-carrying performances simultaneously. Conforming and conflicting behaviors of multiple objective functions are investigated by determining Pareto-optimal solutions, which provide a valuable insight for multi-objective optimization problems. In the second part, design of curved laminated panels for optimal dynamic response is studied in detail. Firstly, the designs yielding maximum fundamental frequency values are computed. Next, optimal designs minimizing equivalent radiated power are obtained for the panels under harmonic pressure excitation, and their effective frequency bands are shown. The relationship between these two design sets is investigated to study the effectiveness of the frequency maximization technique. In the last part, a new method based on lamination parameters is proposed for the design of variable-stiffness composite panels. The results demonstrate that the proposed method provides manufacturable designs with smooth fiber paths that outperform the constant-stiffness laminates, while utilizing the advantages of lamination parameters formulation.

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Multi-objective Optimization of Nonconventional Laminated Composite Panels DOI [BibTex]


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Instrumentation, Data, and Algorithms for Visually Understanding Haptic Surface Properties

Burka, A. L.

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA, August 2018, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering (phdthesis)

Abstract
Autonomous robots need to efficiently walk over varied surfaces and grasp diverse objects. We hypothesize that the association between how such surfaces look and how they physically feel during contact can be learned from a database of matched haptic and visual data recorded from various end-effectors' interactions with hundreds of real-world surfaces. Testing this hypothesis required the creation of a new multimodal sensing apparatus, the collection of a large multimodal dataset, and development of a machine-learning pipeline. This thesis begins by describing the design and construction of the Portable Robotic Optical/Tactile ObservatioN PACKage (PROTONPACK, or Proton for short), an untethered handheld sensing device that emulates the capabilities of the human senses of vision and touch. Its sensory modalities include RGBD vision, egomotion, contact force, and contact vibration. Three interchangeable end-effectors (a steel tooling ball, an OptoForce three-axis force sensor, and a SynTouch BioTac artificial fingertip) allow for different material properties at the contact point and provide additional tactile data. We then detail the calibration process for the motion and force sensing systems, as well as several proof-of-concept surface discrimination experiments that demonstrate the reliability of the device and the utility of the data it collects. This thesis then presents a large-scale dataset of multimodal surface interaction recordings, including 357 unique surfaces such as furniture, fabrics, outdoor fixtures, and items from several private and public material sample collections. Each surface was touched with one, two, or three end-effectors, comprising approximately one minute per end-effector of tapping and dragging at various forces and speeds. We hope that the larger community of robotics researchers will find broad applications for the published dataset. Lastly, we demonstrate an algorithm that learns to estimate haptic surface properties given visual input. Surfaces were rated on hardness, roughness, stickiness, and temperature by the human experimenter and by a pool of purely visual observers. Then we trained an algorithm to perform the same task as well as infer quantitative properties calculated from the haptic data. Overall, the task of predicting haptic properties from vision alone proved difficult for both humans and computers, but a hybrid algorithm using a deep neural network and a support vector machine achieved a correlation between expected and actual regression output between approximately ρ = 0.3 and ρ = 0.5 on previously unseen surfaces.

hi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Kernel Recursive ABC: Point Estimation with Intractable Likelihood

Kajihara, T., Kanagawa, M., Yamazaki, K., Fukumizu, K.

Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 2405-2414, PMLR, July 2018 (conference)

Abstract
We propose a novel approach to parameter estimation for simulator-based statistical models with intractable likelihood. Our proposed method involves recursive application of kernel ABC and kernel herding to the same observed data. We provide a theoretical explanation regarding why the approach works, showing (for the population setting) that, under a certain assumption, point estimates obtained with this method converge to the true parameter, as recursion proceeds. We have conducted a variety of numerical experiments, including parameter estimation for a real-world pedestrian flow simulator, and show that in most cases our method outperforms existing approaches.

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Paper [BibTex]

Paper [BibTex]


Robust Visual Augmented Reality in Robot-Assisted Surgery
Robust Visual Augmented Reality in Robot-Assisted Surgery

Forte, M. P.

Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy, July 2018, Department of Electronic, Information, and Biomedical Engineering (mastersthesis)

Abstract
The broader research objective of this line of research is to test the hypothesis that real-time stereo video analysis and augmented reality can increase safety and task efficiency in robot-assisted surgery. This master’s thesis aims to solve the first step needed to achieve this goal: the creation of a robust system that delivers the envisioned feedback to a surgeon while he or she controls a surgical robot that is identical to those used on human patients. Several approaches for applying augmented reality to da Vinci Surgical Systems have been proposed, but none of them entirely rely on a clinical robot; specifically, they require additional sensors, depend on access to the da Vinci API, are designed for a very specific task, or were tested on systems that are starkly different from those in clinical use. There has also been prior work that presents the real-world camera view and the computer graphics on separate screens, or not in real time. In other scenarios, the digital information is overlaid manually by the surgeons themselves or by computer scientists, rather than being generated automatically in response to the surgeon’s actions. We attempted to overcome the aforementioned constraints by acquiring input signals from the da Vinci stereo endoscope and providing augmented reality to the console in real time (less than 150 ms delay, including the 62 ms of inherent latency of the da Vinci). The potential benefits of the resulting system are broad because it was built to be general, rather than customized for any specific task. The entire platform is compatible with any generation of the da Vinci System and does not require a dVRK (da Vinci Research Kit) or access to the API. Thus, it can be applied to existing da Vinci Systems in operating rooms around the world.

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Assessment Of Atypical Motor Development In Infants Through Toy-Stimulated Play And Center Of Pressure Analysis

Zhao, S., Mohan, M., Torres, W. O., Bogen, D. K., Shofer, F. S., Prosser, L., Loeb, H., Johnson, M. J.

In Proceedings of the Annual Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Conference, Arlington, USA, July 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
There is a need to identify measures and create systems to assess motor development at an early stage. Center of Pressure (CoP) is a quantifiable metric that has been used to investigate postural control in healthy young children [6], children with CP [7], and infants just beginning to sit [8]. It was found that infants born prematurely exhibit different patterns of CoP movement than infants born full-term when assessing development impairments relating to postural control [9]. Preterm infants exhibited greater CoP excursions but had greater variability in their movements than fullterm infants. Our solution, the Play And Neuro-Development Assessment (PANDA) Gym, is a sensorized environment that aims to provide early diagnosis of neuromotor disorder in infants and improve current screening processes by providing quantitative measures rather than subjective ones, and promoting natural play with the stimulus of toys. Previous studies have documented stages in motor development in infants [10, 11], and developmental delays could become more apparent through toy interactions. This study examines the sensitivity of the pressure-sensitive mat subsystem to detect differences in CoP movement patterns for preterm and fullterm infants less than 6 months of age, with varying risk levels. This study aims to distinguish between typical and atypical motor development through assessment of the CoP data of infants in a natural play environment, in conditions where movement may be further stimulated with the presence of a toy.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Counterfactual Mean Embedding: A Kernel Method for Nonparametric Causal Inference

Muandet, K., Kanagawa, M., Saengkyongam, S., Marukata, S.

Workshop on Machine Learning for Causal Inference, Counterfactual Prediction, and Autonomous Action (CausalML) at ICML, July 2018 (conference)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Travelling Ultrasonic Wave Enhances Keyclick Sensation

Gueorguiev, D., Kaci, A., Amberg, M., Giraud, F., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In Haptics: Science, Technology, and Applications, pages: 302-312, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A realistic keyclick sensation is a serious challenge for haptic feedback since vibrotactile rendering faces the limitation of the absence of contact force as experienced on physical buttons. It has been shown that creating a keyclick sensation is possible with stepwise ultrasonic friction modulation. However, the intensity of the sensation is limited by the impedance of the fingertip and by the absence of a lateral force component external to the finger. In our study, we compare this technique to rendering with an ultrasonic travelling wave, which exerts a lateral force on the fingertip. For both techniques, participants were asked to report the detection (or not) of a keyclick during a forced choice one interval procedure. In experiment 1, participants could press the surface as many time as they wanted for a given trial. In experiment 2, they were constrained to press only once. The results show a lower perceptual threshold for travelling waves. Moreover, participants pressed less times per trial and exerted smaller normal force on the surface. The subjective quality of the sensation was found similar for both techniques. In general, haptic feedback based on travelling ultrasonic waves is promising for applications without lateral motion of the finger.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Dissecting Adam: The Sign, Magnitude and Variance of Stochastic Gradients
Dissecting Adam: The Sign, Magnitude and Variance of Stochastic Gradients

Balles, L., Hennig, P.

In Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2018 (inproceedings) Accepted

Abstract
The ADAM optimizer is exceedingly popular in the deep learning community. Often it works very well, sometimes it doesn't. Why? We interpret ADAM as a combination of two aspects: for each weight, the update direction is determined by the sign of stochastic gradients, whereas the update magnitude is determined by an estimate of their relative variance. We disentangle these two aspects and analyze them in isolation, gaining insight into the mechanisms underlying ADAM. This analysis also extends recent results on adverse effects of ADAM on generalization, isolating the sign aspect as the problematic one. Transferring the variance adaptation to SGD gives rise to a novel method, completing the practitioner's toolbox for problems where ADAM fails.

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link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Exploring Fingers’ Limitation of Texture Density Perception on Ultrasonic Haptic Displays

Kalantari, F., Gueorguiev, D., Lank, E., Bremard, N., Grisoni, L.

In Haptics: Science, Technology, and Applications, pages: 354-365, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2018 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recent research in haptic feedback is motivated by the crucial role that tactile perception plays in everyday touch interactions. In this paper, we describe psychophysical experiments to investigate the perceptual threshold of individual fingers on both the right and left hand of right-handed participants using active dynamic touch for spatial period discrimination of both sinusoidal and square-wave gratings on ultrasonic haptic touchscreens. Both one-finger and multi-finger touch were studied and compared. Our results indicate that users' finger identity (index finger, middle finger, etc.) significantly affect the perception of both gratings in the case of one-finger exploration. We show that index finger and thumb are the most sensitive in all conditions whereas little finger followed by ring are the least sensitive for haptic perception. For multi-finger exploration, the right hand was found to be more sensitive than the left hand for both gratings. Our findings also demonstrate similar perception sensitivity between multi-finger exploration and the index finger of users' right hands (i.e. dominant hand in our study), while significant difference was found between single and multi-finger perception sensitivity for the left hand.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Probabilistic Approaches to Stochastic Optimization

Mahsereci, M.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2018 (phdthesis)

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link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


Tactile perception by electrovibration
Tactile perception by electrovibration

Vardar, Y.

Koc University, 2018 (phdthesis)

Abstract
One approach to generating realistic haptic feedback on touch screens is electrovibration. In this technique, the friction force is altered via electrostatic forces, which are generated by applying an alternating voltage signal to the conductive layer of a capacitive touchscreen. Although the technology for rendering haptic effects on touch surfaces using electrovibration is already in place, our knowledge of the perception mechanisms behind these effects is limited. This thesis aims to explore the mechanisms underlying haptic perception of electrovibration in two parts. In the first part, the effect of input signal properties on electrovibration perception is investigated. Our findings indicate that the perception of electrovibration stimuli depends on frequency-dependent electrical properties of human skin and human tactile sensitivity. When a voltage signal is applied to a touchscreen, it is filtered electrically by human finger and it generates electrostatic forces in the skin and mechanoreceptors. Depending on the spectral energy content of this electrostatic force signal, different psychophysical channels may be activated. The channel which mediates the detection is determined by the frequency component which has a higher energy than the sensory threshold at that frequency. In the second part, effect of masking on the electrovibration perception is investigated. We show that the detection thresholds are elevated as linear functions of masking levels for simultaneous and pedestal masking. The masking effectiveness is larger for pedestal masking compared to simultaneous masking. Moreover, our results suggest that sharpness perception depends on the local contrast between background and foreground stimuli, which varies as a function of masking amplitude and activation levels of frequency-dependent psychophysical channels.

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Tactile perception by electrovibration [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Ordinary Differential Equation Solvers — Theory and Applications

Schober, M.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2018 (phdthesis)

ei pn

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2017


On the Design of {LQR} Kernels for Efficient Controller Learning
On the Design of LQR Kernels for Efficient Controller Learning

Marco, A., Hennig, P., Schaal, S., Trimpe, S.

Proceedings of the 56th IEEE Annual Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), pages: 5193-5200, IEEE, IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, December 2017 (conference)

Abstract
Finding optimal feedback controllers for nonlinear dynamic systems from data is hard. Recently, Bayesian optimization (BO) has been proposed as a powerful framework for direct controller tuning from experimental trials. For selecting the next query point and finding the global optimum, BO relies on a probabilistic description of the latent objective function, typically a Gaussian process (GP). As is shown herein, GPs with a common kernel choice can, however, lead to poor learning outcomes on standard quadratic control problems. For a first-order system, we construct two kernels that specifically leverage the structure of the well-known Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), yet retain the flexibility of Bayesian nonparametric learning. Simulations of uncertain linear and nonlinear systems demonstrate that the LQR kernels yield superior learning performance.

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arXiv PDF On the Design of LQR Kernels for Efficient Controller Learning - CDC presentation DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2017


arXiv PDF On the Design of LQR Kernels for Efficient Controller Learning - CDC presentation DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Synchronicity Trumps Mischief in Rhythmic Human-Robot Social-Physical Interaction

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the International Symposium on Robotics Research (ISRR), Puerto Varas, Chile, December 2017 (inproceedings) In press

Abstract
Hand-clapping games and other forms of rhythmic social-physical interaction might help foster human-robot teamwork, but the design of such interactions has scarcely been explored. We leveraged our prior work to enable the Rethink Robotics Baxter Research Robot to competently play one-handed tempo-matching hand-clapping games with a human user. To understand how such a robot’s capabilities and behaviors affect user perception, we created four versions of this interaction: the hand clapping could be initiated by either the robot or the human, and the non-initiating partner could be either cooperative, yielding synchronous motion, or mischievously uncooperative. Twenty adults tested two clapping tempos in each of these four interaction modes in a random order, rating every trial on standardized scales. The study results showed that having the robot initiate the interaction gave it a more dominant perceived personality. Despite previous results on the intrigue of misbehaving robots, we found that moving synchronously with the robot almost always made the interaction more enjoyable, less mentally taxing, less physically demanding, and lower effort for users than asynchronous interactions caused by robot or human mischief. Taken together, our results indicate that cooperative rhythmic social-physical interaction has the potential to strengthen human-robot partnerships.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


A Robotic Framework to Overcome Sensory Overload in Children on the Autism Spectrum: A Pilot Study
A Robotic Framework to Overcome Sensory Overload in Children on the Autism Spectrum: A Pilot Study

Javed, H., Burns, R., Jeon, M., Howard, A., Park, C. H.

In International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) 2017, International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, September 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper discusses a novel framework designed to provide sensory stimulation to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The set up consists of multi-sensory stations to stimulate visual/auditory/olfactory/gustatory/tactile/vestibular senses, together with a robotic agent that navigates through each station responding to the different stimuli. We hypothesize that the robot’s responses will help children learn acceptable ways to respond to stimuli that might otherwise trigger sensory overload. Preliminary results from a pilot study conducted to examine the effectiveness of such a setup were encouraging and are described briefly in this text.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


An Interactive Robotic System for Promoting Social Engagement
An Interactive Robotic System for Promoting Social Engagement

Burns, R., Javed, H., Jeon, M., Howard, A., Park, C. H.

In International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) 2017, International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, September 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This abstract (and poster) is a condensed version of Burns' Master's thesis and related journal article. It discusses the use of imitation via robotic motion learning to improve human-robot interaction. It focuses on the preliminary results from a pilot study of 12 subjects. We hypothesized that the robot's use of imitation will increase the user's openness towards engaging with the robot. Post-imitation, experimental subjects displayed a more positive emotional state, had higher instances of mood contagion towards the robot, and interpreted the robot to have a higher level of autonomy than their control group counterparts. These results point to an increased user interest in engagement fueled by personalized imitation during interaction.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Stiffness Perception during Pinching and Dissection with Teleoperated Haptic Forceps

Ng, C., Zareinia, K., Sun, Q., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), pages: 456-463, Lisbon, Portugal, August 2017 (inproceedings)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Coupling Adaptive Batch Sizes with Learning Rates
Coupling Adaptive Batch Sizes with Learning Rates

Balles, L., Romero, J., Hennig, P.

In Proceedings Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI) 2017, pages: 410-419, (Editors: Gal Elidan and Kristian Kersting), Association for Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (AUAI), Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), August 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Mini-batch stochastic gradient descent and variants thereof have become standard for large-scale empirical risk minimization like the training of neural networks. These methods are usually used with a constant batch size chosen by simple empirical inspection. The batch size significantly influences the behavior of the stochastic optimization algorithm, though, since it determines the variance of the gradient estimates. This variance also changes over the optimization process; when using a constant batch size, stability and convergence is thus often enforced by means of a (manually tuned) decreasing learning rate schedule. We propose a practical method for dynamic batch size adaptation. It estimates the variance of the stochastic gradients and adapts the batch size to decrease the variance proportionally to the value of the objective function, removing the need for the aforementioned learning rate decrease. In contrast to recent related work, our algorithm couples the batch size to the learning rate, directly reflecting the known relationship between the two. On three image classification benchmarks, our batch size adaptation yields faster optimization convergence, while simultaneously simplifying learning rate tuning. A TensorFlow implementation is available.

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Code link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

Code link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


Robotic Motion Learning Framework to Promote Social Engagement
Robotic Motion Learning Framework to Promote Social Engagement

Burns, R.

The George Washington University, August 2017 (mastersthesis)

Abstract
This paper discusses a novel framework designed to increase human-robot interaction through robotic imitation of the user's gestures. The set up consists of a humanoid robotic agent that socializes with and play games with the user. For the experimental group, the robot also imitates one of the user's novel gestures during a play session. We hypothesize that the robot's use of imitation will increase the user's openness towards engaging with the robot. Preliminary results from a pilot study of 12 subjects are promising in that post-imitation, experimental subjects displayed a more positive emotional state, had higher instances of mood contagion towards the robot, and interpreted the robot to have a higher level of autonomy than their control group counterparts. These results point to an increased user interest in engagement fueled by personalized imitation during interaction.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Dynamic Time-of-Flight

Schober, M., Adam, A., Yair, O., Mazor, S., Nowozin, S.

Proceedings IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) 2017, pages: 170-179, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), July 2017 (conference)

ei pn

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Towards quantifying dynamic human-human physical interactions for robot assisted stroke therapy

Mohan, M., Mendonca, R., Johnson, M. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), London, UK, July 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Human-Robot Interaction is a prominent field of robotics today. Knowledge of human-human physical interaction can prove vital in creating dynamic physical interactions between human and robots. Most of the current work in studying this interaction has been from a haptic perspective. Through this paper, we present metrics that can be used to identify if a physical interaction occurred between two people using kinematics. We present a simple Activity of Daily Living (ADL) task which involves a simple interaction. We show that we can use these metrics to successfully identify interactions.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Design of a Parallel Continuum Manipulator for 6-DOF Fingertip Haptic Display

Young, E. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 599-604, Munich, Germany, June 2017, Finalist for best poster paper (inproceedings)

Abstract
Despite rapid advancements in the field of fingertip haptics, rendering tactile cues with six degrees of freedom (6 DOF) remains an elusive challenge. In this paper, we investigate the potential of displaying fingertip haptic sensations with a 6-DOF parallel continuum manipulator (PCM) that mounts to the user's index finger and moves a contact platform around the fingertip. Compared to traditional mechanisms composed of rigid links and discrete joints, PCMs have the potential to be strong, dexterous, and compact, but they are also more complicated to design. We define the design space of 6-DOF parallel continuum manipulators and outline a process for refining such a device for fingertip haptic applications. Following extensive simulation, we obtain 12 designs that meet our specifications, construct a manually actuated prototype of one such design, and evaluate the simulation's ability to accurately predict the prototype's motion. Finally, we demonstrate the range of deliverable fingertip tactile cues, including a normal force into the finger and shear forces tangent to the finger at three extreme points on the boundary of the fingertip.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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High Magnitude Unidirectional Haptic Force Display Using a Motor/Brake Pair and a Cable

Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 394-399, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Clever electromechanical design is required to make the force feedback delivered by a kinesthetic haptic interface both strong and safe. This paper explores a onedimensional haptic force display that combines a DC motor and a magnetic particle brake on the same shaft. Rather than a rigid linkage, a spooled cable connects the user to the actuators to enable a large workspace, reduce the moving mass, and eliminate the sticky residual force from the brake. This design combines the high torque/power ratio of the brake and the active output capabilities of the motor to provide a wider range of forces than can be achieved with either actuator alone. A prototype of this device was built, its performance was characterized, and it was used to simulate constant force sources and virtual springs and dampers. Compared to the conventional design of using only a motor, the hybrid device can output higher unidirectional forces at the expense of free space feeling less free.

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A Stimulus-Response Model Of Therapist-Patient Interactions In Task-Oriented Stroke Therapy Can Guide Robot-Patient Interactions

Johnson, M., Mohan, M., Mendonca, R.

In Proceedings of the Annual Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Conference, New Orleans, USA, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Current robot-patient interactions do not accurately model therapist-patient interactions in task-oriented stroke therapy. We analyzed patient-therapist interactions in task-oriented stroke therapy captured in 8 videos. We developed a model of the interaction between a patient and a therapist that can be overlaid on a stimulus-response paradigm where the therapist and the patient take on a set of acting states or roles and are motivated to move from one role to another when certain physical or verbal stimuli or cues are sensed and received. We examined how the model varies across 8 activities of daily living tasks and map this to a possible model for robot-patient interaction.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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A Wrist-Squeezing Force-Feedback System for Robotic Surgery Training

Brown, J. D., Fernandez, J. N., Cohen, S. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 107-112, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Over time, surgical trainees learn to compensate for the lack of haptic feedback in commercial robotic minimally invasive surgical systems. Incorporating touch cues into robotic surgery training could potentially shorten this learning process if the benefits of haptic feedback were sustained after it is removed. In this paper, we develop a wrist-squeezing haptic feedback system and evaluate whether it holds the potential to train novice da Vinci users to reduce the force they exert on a bimanual inanimate training task. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups according to a multiple baseline experimental design. Each of the ten participants moved a ring along a curved wire nine times while the haptic feedback was conditionally withheld, provided, and withheld again. The realtime tactile feedback of applied force magnitude significantly reduced the integral of the force produced by the da Vinci tools on the task materials, and this result remained even when the haptic feedback was removed. Overall, our findings suggest that wrist-squeezing force feedback can play an essential role in helping novice trainees learn to minimize the force they exert with a surgical robot.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Handling Scan-Time Parameters in Haptic Surface Classification

Burka, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 424-429, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Virtual vs. {R}eal: Trading Off Simulations and Physical Experiments in Reinforcement Learning with {B}ayesian Optimization
Virtual vs. Real: Trading Off Simulations and Physical Experiments in Reinforcement Learning with Bayesian Optimization

Marco, A., Berkenkamp, F., Hennig, P., Schoellig, A. P., Krause, A., Schaal, S., Trimpe, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 1557-1563, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), May 2017 (inproceedings)

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PDF arXiv ICRA 2017 Spotlight presentation Virtual vs. Real - Video explanation DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF arXiv ICRA 2017 Spotlight presentation Virtual vs. Real - Video explanation DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Proton 2: Increasing the Sensitivity and Portability of a Visuo-haptic Surface Interaction Recorder

Burka, A., Rajvanshi, A., Allen, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 439-445, Singapore, May 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Portable Robotic Optical/Tactile ObservatioN PACKage (PROTONPACK, or Proton for short) is a new handheld visuo-haptic sensing system that records surface interactions. We previously demonstrated system calibration and a classification task using external motion tracking. This paper details improvements in surface classification performance and removal of the dependence on external motion tracking, necessary before embarking on our goal of gathering a vast surface interaction dataset. Two experiments were performed to refine data collection parameters. After adjusting the placement and filtering of the Proton's high-bandwidth accelerometers, we recorded interactions between two differently-sized steel tooling ball end-effectors (diameter 6.35 and 9.525 mm) and five surfaces. Using features based on normal force, tangential force, end-effector speed, and contact vibration, we trained multi-class SVMs to classify the surfaces using 50 ms chunks of data from each end-effector. Classification accuracies of 84.5% and 91.5% respectively were achieved on unseen test data, an improvement over prior results. In parallel, we pursued on-board motion tracking, using the Proton's camera and fiducial markers. Motion tracks from the external and onboard trackers agree within 2 mm and 0.01 rad RMS, and the accuracy decreases only slightly to 87.7% when using onboard tracking for the 9.525 mm end-effector. These experiments indicate that the Proton 2 is ready for portable data collection.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Robot Therapist for Assisting in At-Home Rehabilitation of Shoulder Surgery Patients
Robot Therapist for Assisting in At-Home Rehabilitation of Shoulder Surgery Patients

(Recipient of Innovation & Entrepreneurship Prize)

Burns, R., Alborz, M., Chalup, Z., Downen, S., Genuino, K., Nayback, C., Nesbitt, N., Park, C. H.

In 2017 GW Research Days, Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations, April 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The number of middle-aged to elderly patients receiving shoulder surgery is increasing. However, statistically, very few of these patients perform the necessary at-home physical therapy regimen they are prescribed post-surgery. This results in longer recovery times and/or incomplete healing. We propose the use of a robotic therapist, with customized training and encouragement regimens, to increase physical therapy adherence and improve the patient’s recovery experience.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Fast Bayesian Optimization of Machine Learning Hyperparameters on Large Datasets
Fast Bayesian Optimization of Machine Learning Hyperparameters on Large Datasets

Klein, A., Falkner, S., Bartels, S., Hennig, P., Hutter, F.

Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS 2017), 54, pages: 528-536, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Sign, Aarti and Zhu, Jerry), PMLR, April 2017 (conference)

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pdf link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

pdf link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


Motion Learning for Emotional Interaction and Imitation of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Motion Learning for Emotional Interaction and Imitation of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

(First place tie in category, "Biomedical Engineering, Graduate Research")

Burns, R., Cowin, S.

In 2017 GW Research Days, Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations, April 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We aim to use motion learning to teach a robot to imitate people's unique gestures. Our robot, ROBOTIS-OP2, can ultimately use imitation to practice social skills with children with autism. In this abstract, two methods of motion learning were compared: Dynamic motion primitives with least squares (DMP with WLS), and Dynamic motion primitives with a Gaussian Mixture Regression (DMP with GMR). Movements with sharp turns were most accurately reproduced using DMP with GMR. Additionally, more states are required to accurately recreate more complex gestures.

hi

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Roughness perception of virtual textures displayed by electrovibration on touch screens
Roughness perception of virtual textures displayed by electrovibration on touch screens

Vardar, Y., Isleyen, A., Saleem, M. K., Basdogan, C.

In 2017 IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 263-268, 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this study, we have investigated the human roughness perception of periodical textures on an electrostatic display by conducting psychophysical experiments with 10 subjects. To generate virtual textures, we used low frequency unipolar pulse waves in different waveform (sinusoidal, square, saw-tooth, triangle), and spacing. We modulated these waves with a 3kHz high frequency sinusoidal carrier signal to minimize perceptional differences due to the electrical filtering of human finger and eliminate low-frequency distortions. The subjects were asked to rate 40 different macro textures on a Likert scale of 1-7. We also collected the normal and tangential forces acting on the fingers of subjects during the experiment. The results of our user study showed that subjects perceived the square wave as the roughest while they perceived the other waveforms equally rough. The perceived roughness followed an inverted U-shaped curve as a function of groove width, but the peak point shifted to the left compared to the results of the earlier studies. Moreover, we found that the roughness perception of subjects is best correlated with the rate of change of the contact forces rather than themselves.

hi

vardar_whc2017 DOI [BibTex]

vardar_whc2017 DOI [BibTex]


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Feeling multiple edges: The tactile perception of short ultrasonic square reductions of the finger-surface friction

Gueorguiev, D., Vezzoli, E., Sednaoui, T., Grisoni, L., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In 2017 IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 125-129, 2017 (inproceedings)

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2016


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Qualitative User Reactions to a Hand-Clapping Humanoid Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 317-327, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

2016


[BibTex]


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Designing and Assessing Expressive Open-Source Faces for the Baxter Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 340-350, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Rhythmic Timing in Playful Human-Robot Social Motor Coordination

Fitter, N. T., Hawkes, D. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 296-305, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Using IMU Data to Demonstrate Hand-Clapping Games to a Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 851 - 856, October 2016, Interactive presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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ProtonPack: A Visuo-Haptic Data Acquisition System for Robotic Learning of Surface Properties

Burka, A., Hu, S., Helgeson, S., Krishnan, S., Gao, Y., Hendricks, L. A., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Multisensor Fusion and Integration for Intelligent Systems (MFI), pages: 58-65, 2016, Oral presentation given by Burka (inproceedings)

hi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Equipping the Baxter Robot with Human-Inspired Hand-Clapping Skills

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), pages: 105-112, 2016 (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Comparison of vibro-acoustic performance metrics in the design and optimization of stiffened composite fuselages

Serhat, G., Basdogan, I.

In Proceedings of International Congress and Exposition of Noise Control Engineering (INTER-NOISE), Hamburg, Germany, August 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, a comparison of preliminary design methodologies for optimization of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite fuselages for vibro-acoustic requirements is presented. Fuselage stiffness properties are modelled using lamination parameters and their effect on the vibro-acoustic performance is investigated using two different approaches. First method, only considers the structural model in order to explore the effect of design variables on fuselage vibrations. The simplified estimation of the acoustic behavior without considering fluid-structure interaction brings certain advantages such as reduced modelling effort and computational cost. In this case, the performance metric is chosen as equivalent radiated power (ERP) which is a well-known criterion in the prediction of structure-born noise. Second method, utilizes coupled vibro-acoustic models to predict the sound pressure levels (SPL) inside the fuselage. ERP is calculated both for bay panels and fuselage section and then compared with the SPL results. The response surfaces of each metric are determined as a function of lamination parameters and their overall difference is quantified. ERP approach proves its merit provided that a sufficiently accurate model is used. The results demonstrate the importance of the simplifications made in the modelling and the selection of analysis approach in vibro-acoustic design of fuselages.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Reproducing a Laser Pointer Dot on a Secondary Projected Screen

Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM), pages: 1645-1650, 2016, Oral presentation given by Hu (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Effect of Aspect Ratio and Boundary Conditions on the Eigenfrequency Optimization of Composite Panels Using Lamination Parameters

Serhat, G., Basdogan, I.

In Proceedings of the ASMO UK International Conference on Numerical Optimisation Methods for Engineering Design, pages: 160–168, Munich, Germany, July 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Eigenfrequency optimization of laminated composite panels is a common engineering problem. This process mostly involves designing stiffness properties of the structure. Optimal results can differ significantly depending on the values of the model parameters and the metrics used for the optimization. Building the know-how on this matter is crucial for choosing the appropriate design methodologies as well as validation and justification of prospective results. In this paper, effects of aspect ratio and boundary conditions on eigenfrequency optimization of composite panels by altering stiffness properties are investigated. Lamination parameters are chosen as design variables which are used in the modeling of stiffness tensors. This technique enables representation of overall stiffness characteristics and provides a convex design space. Fundamental frequency and difference between fundamental and second natural frequencies are maximized as design objectives. Optimization studies incorporating different models and responses are performed. Optimal lamination parameters and response values are provided for each case and the effects of model parameters on the solutions are quantified. The results indicate that trends of the optima change for different aspect ratio ranges and boundary conditions. Moreover, convergence occurs beyond certain critical values of the model parameters which may cause an optimization study to be redundant.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Multi-objective optimization of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite fuselages for mechanical and vibro-acoustic requirements

Serhat, G., Faria, T. G., Basdogan, I.

In Proceedings of AIAA/ISSMO Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization Conference, Washington, USA, June 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, a preliminary design methodology for optimization of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite fuselages for combined mechanical and vibro-acoustic requirements is presented. Laminate stiffness distributions are represented using the method called lamination parameters which is known to provide a convex solution space. Single-objective and multi-objective optimization studies are carried out in order to find optimal stiffness distributions. Performance metrics for acoustical behavior are chosen as maximum fundamental frequency and minimum equivalent radiated power. The mechanical performance metric is chosen as the maximum stiffness. The results show that the presented methodology works effectively and it can be used to improve load-carrying and acoustical performances simultaneously.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Active Uncertainty Calibration in Bayesian ODE Solvers
Active Uncertainty Calibration in Bayesian ODE Solvers

Kersting, H., Hennig, P.

Proceedings of the 32nd Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), pages: 309-318, (Editors: Ihler, A. and Janzing, D.), AUAI Press, June 2016 (conference)

Abstract
There is resurging interest, in statistics and machine learning, in solvers for ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that return probability measures instead of point estimates. Recently, Conrad et al.~introduced a sampling-based class of methods that are `well-calibrated' in a specific sense. But the computational cost of these methods is significantly above that of classic methods. On the other hand, Schober et al.~pointed out a precise connection between classic Runge-Kutta ODE solvers and Gaussian filters, which gives only a rough probabilistic calibration, but at negligible cost overhead. By formulating the solution of ODEs as approximate inference in linear Gaussian SDEs, we investigate a range of probabilistic ODE solvers, that bridge the trade-off between computational cost and probabilistic calibration, and identify the inaccurate gradient measurement as the crucial source of uncertainty. We propose the novel filtering-based method Bayesian Quadrature filtering (BQF) which uses Bayesian quadrature to actively learn the imprecision in the gradient measurement by collecting multiple gradient evaluations.

ei pn

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


Automatic LQR Tuning Based on Gaussian Process Global Optimization
Automatic LQR Tuning Based on Gaussian Process Global Optimization

Marco, A., Hennig, P., Bohg, J., Schaal, S., Trimpe, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 270-277, IEEE, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper proposes an automatic controller tuning framework based on linear optimal control combined with Bayesian optimization. With this framework, an initial set of controller gains is automatically improved according to a pre-defined performance objective evaluated from experimental data. The underlying Bayesian optimization algorithm is Entropy Search, which represents the latent objective as a Gaussian process and constructs an explicit belief over the location of the objective minimum. This is used to maximize the information gain from each experimental evaluation. Thus, this framework shall yield improved controllers with fewer evaluations compared to alternative approaches. A seven-degree- of-freedom robot arm balancing an inverted pole is used as the experimental demonstrator. Results of a two- and four- dimensional tuning problems highlight the method’s potential for automatic controller tuning on robotic platforms.

am ics pn

Video - Automatic LQR Tuning Based on Gaussian Process Global Optimization - ICRA 2016 Video - Automatic Controller Tuning on a Two-legged Robot PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Video - Automatic LQR Tuning Based on Gaussian Process Global Optimization - ICRA 2016 Video - Automatic Controller Tuning on a Two-legged Robot PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Batch Bayesian Optimization via Local Penalization

González, J., Dai, Z., Hennig, P., Lawrence, N.

Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 51, pages: 648-657, JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings, (Editors: Gretton, A. and Robert, C. C.), May 2016 (conference)

ei pn

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


Probabilistic Approximate Least-Squares
Probabilistic Approximate Least-Squares

Bartels, S., Hennig, P.

Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 51, pages: 676-684, JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings, (Editors: Gretton, A. and Robert, C. C. ), May 2016 (conference)

Abstract
Least-squares and kernel-ridge / Gaussian process regression are among the foundational algorithms of statistics and machine learning. Famously, the worst-case cost of exact nonparametric regression grows cubically with the data-set size; but a growing number of approximations have been developed that estimate good solutions at lower cost. These algorithms typically return point estimators, without measures of uncertainty. Leveraging recent results casting elementary linear algebra operations as probabilistic inference, we propose a new approximate method for nonparametric least-squares that affords a probabilistic uncertainty estimate over the error between the approximate and exact least-squares solution (this is not the same as the posterior variance of the associated Gaussian process regressor). This allows estimating the error of the least-squares solution on a subset of the data relative to the full-data solution. The uncertainty can be used to control the computational effort invested in the approximation. Our algorithm has linear cost in the data-set size, and a simple formal form, so that it can be implemented with a few lines of code in programming languages with linear algebra functionality.

ei pn

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Deep Learning for Tactile Understanding From Visual and Haptic Data

Gao, Y., Hendricks, L. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Darrell, T.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 536-543, May 2016, Oral presentation given by Gao (inproceedings)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]