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2013


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Determination of an Analysis Procedure for FEM-Based Fatigue Calculations

Serhat, G.

Technical University of Munich, December 2013 (mastersthesis)

hi

[BibTex]

2013


[BibTex]


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A Practical System For Recording Instrument Interactions During Live Robotic Surgery

McMahan, W., Gomez, E. D., Chen, L., Bark, K., Nappo, J. C., Koch, E. I., Lee, D. I., Dumon, K., Williams, N., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Journal of Robotic Surgery, 7(4):351-358, 2013 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Vibrotactile Display: Perception, Technology, and Applications

Choi, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Proceedings of the IEEE, 101(9):2093-2104, sep 2013 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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ROS Open-source Audio Recognizer: ROAR Environmental Sound Detection Tools for Robot Programming

Romano, J. M., Brindza, J. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Autonomous Robots, 34(3):207-215, April 2013 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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In Vivo Validation of a System for Haptic Feedback of Tool Vibrations in Robotic Surgery

Bark, K., McMahan, W., Remington, A., Gewirtz, J., Wedmid, A., Lee, D. I., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 27(2):656-664, February 2013, dynamic article (paper plus video), available at \href{http://www.springerlink.com/content/417j532708417342/}{http://www.springerlink.com/content/417j532708417342/} (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Perception of Springs with Visual and Proprioceptive Motion Cues: Implications for Prosthetics

Gurari, N., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Okamura, A. M.

IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems, 43, pages: 102-114, January 2013, \href{http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBRw87Wk29E\&feature=youtu.be}{Video} (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Expectation and Attention in Hierarchical Auditory Prediction

Chennu, S., Noreika, V., Gueorguiev, D., Blenkmann, A., Kochen, S., Ibáñez, A., Owen, A. M., Bekinschtein, T. A.

Journal of Neuroscience, 33(27):11194-11205, Society for Neuroscience, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Hierarchical predictive coding suggests that attention in humans emerges from increased precision in probabilistic inference, whereas expectation biases attention in favor of contextually anticipated stimuli. We test these notions within auditory perception by independently manipulating top-down expectation and attentional precision alongside bottom-up stimulus predictability. Our findings support an integrative interpretation of commonly observed electrophysiological signatures of neurodynamics, namely mismatch negativity (MMN), P300, and contingent negative variation (CNV), as manifestations along successive levels of predictive complexity. Early first-level processing indexed by the MMN was sensitive to stimulus predictability: here, attentional precision enhanced early responses, but explicit top-down expectation diminished it. This pattern was in contrast to later, second-level processing indexed by the P300: although sensitive to the degree of predictability, responses at this level were contingent on attentional engagement and in fact sharpened by top-down expectation. At the highest level, the drift of the CNV was a fine-grained marker of top-down expectation itself. Source reconstruction of high-density EEG, supported by intracranial recordings, implicated temporal and frontal regions differentially active at early and late levels. The cortical generators of the CNV suggested that it might be involved in facilitating the consolidation of context-salient stimuli into conscious perception. These results provide convergent empirical support to promising recent accounts of attention and expectation in predictive coding.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Optimal distribution of contact forces with inverse-dynamics control

Righetti, L., Buchli, J., Mistry, M., Kalakrishnan, M., Schaal, S.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 32(3):280-298, March 2013 (article)

Abstract
The development of legged robots for complex environments requires controllers that guarantee both high tracking performance and compliance with the environment. More specifically the control of the contact interaction with the environment is of crucial importance to ensure stable, robust and safe motions. In this contribution we develop an inverse-dynamics controller for floating-base robots under contact constraints that can minimize any combination of linear and quadratic costs in the contact constraints and the commands. Our main result is the exact analytical derivation of the controller. Such a result is particularly relevant for legged robots as it allows us to use torque redundancy to directly optimize contact interactions. For example, given a desired locomotion behavior, we can guarantee the minimization of contact forces to reduce slipping on difficult terrains while ensuring high tracking performance of the desired motion. The main advantages of the controller are its simplicity, computational efficiency and robustness to model inaccuracies. We present detailed experimental results on simulated humanoid and quadruped robots as well as a real quadruped robot. The experiments demonstrate that the controller can greatly improve the robustness of locomotion of the robots.1

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Controlled Reduction with Unactuated Cyclic Variables: Application to 3D Bipedal Walking with Passive Yaw Rotation

Gregg, R., Righetti, L.

IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 58(10):2679-2685, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
This technical note shows that viscous damping can shape momentum conservation laws in a manner that stabilizes yaw rotation and enables steering for underactuated 3D walking. We first show that unactuated cyclic variables can be controlled by passively shaped conservation laws given a stabilizing controller in the actuated coordinates. We then exploit this result to realize controlled geometric reduction with multiple unactuated cyclic variables. We apply this underactuated control strategy to a five-link 3D biped to produce exponentially stable straight-ahead walking and steering in the presence of passive yawing.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2012


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The Balancing Cube: A Dynamic Sculpture as Test Bed for Distributed Estimation and Control

Trimpe, S., D’Andrea, R.

IEEE Control Systems Magazine, 32(6):48-75, December 2012 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

2012


DOI [BibTex]


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Evaluation of Tactile Feedback Methods for Wrist Rotation Guidance

Stanley, A. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 5(3):240-251, July 2012 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Creating realistic virtual textures from contact acceleration data

Romano, J. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 5(2):109-119, April 2012, Cover article (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Estimation of MIMO Closed-Loop Poles using Transfer Function Data
Estimation of MIMO Closed-Loop Poles using Transfer Function Data

Vardar, Y.

Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands, 2012 (mastersthesis)

Abstract
For the development of high-tech systems such as lithographic positioning systems, throughput and accuracy are the main requirements. Nowadays, the trend to reach demanded accuracy and throughput levels is designing lightweight and consequently more flexible systems. To control these systems with a more effective and less conservative way, control design should go beyond the traditional rigid control and cope with the flexibilities that limit achievable bandwidth and performance. Therefore, conventional loop shaping methods are not sufficient to reach the performance criterions. Since obtaining an accurate parametric model is very complex and time-consuming for these high-tech systems, using well-developed model-based controller synthesis methods is also not a superior option. To achieve desired performance criterions, one solution can be implemented is reducing the gap between model-based and data-based control synthesis methods. In previous research, a method was developed to define the dynamic behavior of the system without a need for a parametric model. By this method transfer function data (TFD), which provides the information on the whole s-plane can be obtained from frequency response data (FRD) of the system. This innovation was a very important step to use data-based techniques for model-based controller synthesis methods. In this thesis firstly the standard technique to obtain TFD defined in [2] is extended. This standard technique to obtain TFD is not compatible with systems with pure integrators. To extend the methodology also for those systems, two techniques, which are altering the contour and filtering the system, are proposed. Then, the accuracy of TFD is investigated in detail. It is shown that the accuracy of TFD depends on the quality of FRD obtained and the computation techniques used to calculate TFD. Then, a technique which enables to determine the closed-loop poles of a MIMO system using TFD is discussed. The validity of the technique is proven with the help of complex function theory and calculus. Also, the factors that prevent determination of the closed-loop poles are discussed. In addition, it is observed that the accuracy of the closed-loop determination method depends on the quality of obtained TFD and the computation techniques. The proposed theory to obtain TFD and determination of closed-loop poles is validated with experiments conducted to a prototype lightweight system. Also, using experimental frequency response data of NXT-A7 test rig, the success of the proposed methodology is validated also for complex systems. Through these experimental results, it can be concluded that this new technique could be very advantageous in terms of ease of use and accuracy to determine the closed-loop poles of a MIMO lightly damped system.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Construct Validity of Instrument Vibrations as a Measure of Robotic Surgical Skill

Gomez, E. D., Bark, K., Rivera, C., McMahan, W., Remington, A., Lee, D. I., Williams, N., Murayama, K., Dumon, K., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 215(3):S119-120, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2012, Oral presentation given by Gomez at the {\em American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress} (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2010


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Lack of Discriminatory Function for Endoscopy Skills on a Computer-based Simulator

Kim, S., Spencer, G., Makar, G., Ahmad, N., Jaffe, D., Ginsberg, G., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kochman, M.

Surgical Endoscopy, 24(12):3008-3015, December 2010 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

2010


[BibTex]


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Identifying the Role of Proprioception in Upper-Limb Prosthesis Control: Studies on Targeted Motion

Blank, A., Okamura, A. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, 7(3):1-23, June 2010 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]