Header logo is


2016


A New Perspective and Extension of the Gaussian Filter
A New Perspective and Extension of the Gaussian Filter

Wüthrich, M., Trimpe, S., Garcia Cifuentes, C., Kappler, D., Schaal, S.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 35(14):1731-1749, December 2016 (article)

Abstract
The Gaussian Filter (GF) is one of the most widely used filtering algorithms; instances are the Extended Kalman Filter, the Unscented Kalman Filter and the Divided Difference Filter. The GF represents the belief of the current state by a Gaussian distribution, whose mean is an affine function of the measurement. We show that this representation can be too restrictive to accurately capture the dependences in systems with nonlinear observation models, and we investigate how the GF can be generalized to alleviate this problem. To this end, we view the GF as the solution to a constrained optimization problem. From this new perspective, the GF is seen as a special case of a much broader class of filters, obtained by relaxing the constraint on the form of the approximate posterior. On this basis, we outline some conditions which potential generalizations have to satisfy in order to maintain the computational efficiency of the GF. We propose one concrete generalization which corresponds to the standard GF using a pseudo measurement instead of the actual measurement. Extending an existing GF implementation in this manner is trivial. Nevertheless, we show that this small change can have a major impact on the estimation accuracy.

am ics

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2016


PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


no image
An electro-active polymer based lens module for dynamically varying focal system

Yun, S., Park, S., Nam, S., Park, B., Park, S. K., Mun, S., Lim, J. M., Kyung, K.

Applied Physics Letters, 109(14):141908, October 2016 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate a polymer-based active-lens module allowing a dynamic focus controllable optical system with a wide tunable range. The active-lens module is composed of parallelized two active- lenses with a convex and a concave shaped hemispherical lens structure, respectively. Under opera- tion with dynamic input voltage signals, each active-lens produces translational movement bi-directionally responding to a hybrid driving force that is a combination of an electro-active response of a thin dielectric elastomer membrane and an electro-static attraction force. Since the proposed active lens module widely modulates a gap-distance between lens-elements, an optical system based on the active-lens module provides widely-variable focusing for selective imaging of objects in arbitrary position.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Wrinkle structures formed by formulating UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers

Park, S. K., Kwark, Y., Nam, S., Park, S., Park, B., Yun, S., Moon, J., Lee, J., Yu, B., Kyung, K.

Polymer, 99, pages: 447-452, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Artificial wrinkles have recently been in the spotlight due to their potential use in high-tech applications. A spontaneously wrinkled film can be fabricated from UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers. Here, we controlled the wrinkle formation by simply formulating two UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers, tetraethylene glycol bis(4-ethenyl-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl) ether (TEGDSt) and tetraethylene glycol diacrylate (TEGDA). The wrinkles were formed from the TEGDSt/TEGDA formulated prepolymer layers containing up to 30 wt% of TEGDA. The wrinkle formation depended upon the rate of photo-crosslinking reaction of the formulated prepolymers. The first order apparent rate constant, kapp, was between ca. 5.7 × 10−3 and 12.2 × 10−3 s−1 for the wrinkle formation. The wrinkle structures were modulated within the kapp mainly due to variation in the extent of shrinkage of the formulated prepolymer layers with the content of TEGDA

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Objective assessment of robotic surgical skill using instrument contact vibrations

Gomez, E. D., Aggarwal, R., McMahan, W., Bark, K., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 30(4):1419-1431, 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Cutaneous Feedback of Fingertip Deformation and Vibration for Palpation in Robotic Surgery

Pacchierotti, C., Prattichizzo, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 63(2):278-287, February 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control

Nam, S., Park, S., Yun, S., Park, B., Park, S. K., Kyung, K.

Optics Express, 24(1):55-66, OSA, January 2016 (article)

Abstract
We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Supplemental material for ’Communication Rate Analysis for Event-based State Estimation’

Ebner, S., Trimpe, S.

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, January 2016 (techreport)

am ics

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Peripheral vs. central determinants of vibrotactile adaptation

Klöcker, A., Gueorguiev, D., Thonnard, J. L., Mouraux, A.

Journal of Neurophysiology, 115(2):685-691, 2016, PMID: 26581868 (article)

Abstract
Long-lasting mechanical vibrations applied to the skin induce a reversible decrease in the perception of vibration at the stimulated skin site. This phenomenon of vibrotactile adaptation has been studied extensively, yet there is still no clear consensus on the mechanisms leading to vibrotactile adaptation. In particular, the respective contributions of 1) changes affecting mechanical skin impedance, 2) peripheral processes, and 3) central processes are largely unknown. Here we used direct electrical stimulation of nerve fibers to bypass mechanical transduction processes and thereby explore the possible contribution of central vs. peripheral processes to vibrotactile adaptation. Three experiments were conducted. In the first, adaptation was induced with mechanical vibration of the fingertip (51- or 251-Hz vibration delivered for 8 min, at 40× detection threshold). In the second, we attempted to induce adaptation with transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the median nerve (51- or 251-Hz constant-current pulses delivered for 8 min, at 1.5× detection threshold). Vibrotactile detection thresholds were measured before and after adaptation. Mechanical stimulation induced a clear increase of vibrotactile detection thresholds. In contrast, thresholds were unaffected by electrical stimulation. In the third experiment, we assessed the effect of mechanical adaptation on the detection thresholds to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimuli, measured before and after adaptation. Electrical detection thresholds were unaffected by the mechanical adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that vibrotactile adaptation is predominantly the consequence of peripheral mechanoreceptor processes and/or changes in biomechanical properties of the skin.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Silent Expectations: Dynamic Causal Modeling of Cortical Prediction and Attention to Sounds That Weren’t

Chennu, S., Noreika, V., Gueorguiev, D., Shtyrov, Y., Bekinschtein, T. A., Henson, R.

Journal of Neuroscience, 36(32):8305-8316, Society for Neuroscience, 2016 (article)

Abstract
There is increasing evidence that human perception is realized by a hierarchy of neural processes in which predictions sent backward from higher levels result in prediction errors that are fed forward from lower levels, to update the current model of the environment. Moreover, the precision of prediction errors is thought to be modulated by attention. Much of this evidence comes from paradigms in which a stimulus differs from that predicted by the recent history of other stimuli (generating a so-called {\textquotedblleft}mismatch response{\textquotedblright}). There is less evidence from situations where a prediction is not fulfilled by any sensory input (an {\textquotedblleft}omission{\textquotedblright} response). This situation arguably provides a more direct measure of {\textquotedblleft}top-down{\textquotedblright} predictions in the absence of confounding {\textquotedblleft}bottom-up{\textquotedblright} input. We applied Dynamic Causal Modeling of evoked electromagnetic responses recorded by EEG and MEG to an auditory paradigm in which we factorially crossed the presence versus absence of {\textquotedblleft}bottom-up{\textquotedblright} stimuli with the presence versus absence of {\textquotedblleft}top-down{\textquotedblright} attention. Model comparison revealed that both mismatch and omission responses were mediated by increased forward and backward connections, differing primarily in the driving input. In both responses, modeling results suggested that the presence of attention selectively modulated backward {\textquotedblleft}prediction{\textquotedblright} connections. Our results provide new model-driven evidence of the pure top-down prediction signal posited in theories of hierarchical perception, and highlight the role of attentional precision in strengthening this prediction.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human auditory perception is thought to be realized by a network of neurons that maintain a model of and predict future stimuli. Much of the evidence for this comes from experiments where a stimulus unexpectedly differs from previous ones, which generates a well-known {\textquotedblleft}mismatch response.{\textquotedblright} But what happens when a stimulus is unexpectedly omitted altogether? By measuring the brain{\textquoteright}s electromagnetic activity, we show that it also generates an {\textquotedblleft}omission response{\textquotedblright} that is contingent on the presence of attention. We model these responses computationally, revealing that mismatch and omission responses only differ in the location of inputs into the same underlying neuronal network. In both cases, we show that attention selectively strengthens the brain{\textquoteright}s prediction of the future.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Event-based Sampling for Reducing Communication Load in Realtime Human Motion Analysis by Wireless Inertial Sensor Networks

Laidig, D., Trimpe, S., Seel, T.

Current Directions in Biomedical Engineering, 2(1):711-714, De Gruyter, 2016 (article)

am ics

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Touch uses frictional cues to discriminate flat materials

Gueorguiev, D., Bochereau, S., Mouraux, A., Hayward, V., Thonnard, J.

Scientific reports, 6, pages: 25553, Nature Publishing Group, 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2015


no image
Distributed Event-based State Estimation

Trimpe, S.

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, November 2015 (techreport)

Abstract
An event-based state estimation approach for reducing communication in a networked control system is proposed. Multiple distributed sensor-actuator-agents observe a dynamic process and sporadically exchange their measurements and inputs over a bus network. Based on these data, each agent estimates the full state of the dynamic system, which may exhibit arbitrary inter-agent couplings. Local event-based protocols ensure that data is transmitted only when necessary to meet a desired estimation accuracy. This event-based scheme is shown to mimic a centralized Luenberger observer design up to guaranteed bounds, and stability is proven in the sense of bounded estimation errors for bounded disturbances. The stability result extends to the distributed control system that results when the local state estimates are used for distributed feedback control. Simulation results highlight the benefit of the event-based approach over classical periodic ones in reducing communication requirements.

am ics

arXiv [BibTex]

2015


arXiv [BibTex]


no image
Reducing Student Anonymity and Increasing Engagement

Kuchenbecker, K. J.

University of Pennsylvania Almanac, 62(18):8, November 2015 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Surgeons and Non-Surgeons Prefer Haptic Feedback of Instrument Vibrations During Robotic Surgery

Koehn, J. K., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 29(10):2970-2983, October 2015 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Displaying Sensed Tactile Cues with a Fingertip Haptic Device

Pacchierotti, C., Prattichizzo, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 8(4):384-396, October 2015 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A thin film active-lens with translational control for dynamically programmable optical zoom

Yun, S., Park, S., Park, B., Nam, S., Park, S. K., Kyung, K.

Applied Physics Letters, 107(8):081907, AIP Publishing, August 2015 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate a thin film active-lens for rapidly and dynamically controllable optical zoom. The active-lens is composed of a convex hemispherical polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens structure working as an aperture and a dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane actuator, which is a combination of a thin DE layer made with PDMS and a compliant electrode pattern using silver-nanowires. The active-lens is capable of dynamically changing focal point of the soft aperture as high as 18.4% through its translational movement in vertical direction responding to electrically induced bulged-up deformation of the DE membrane actuator. Under operation with various sinusoidal voltage signals, the movement responses are fairly consistent with those estimated from numerical simulation. The responses are not only fast, fairly reversible, and highly durable during continuous cyclic operations, but also large enough to impart dynamic focus tunability for optical zoom in microscopic imaging devices with a light-weight and ultra-slim configuration.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Data-Driven Motion Mappings Improve Transparency in Teleoperation

Khurshid, R. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 24(2):132-154, May 2015 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Robotic Learning of Haptic Adjectives Through Physical Interaction

Chu, V., McMahon, I., Riano, L., McDonald, C. G., He, Q., Perez-Tejada, J. M., Arrigo, M., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 63(3):279-292, 2015, Vivian Chu, Ian MacMahon, and Lorenzo Riano contributed equally to this publication. Corrigendum published in June 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback on Human Motor Learning of Arbitrary Arm Motions

Bark, K., Hyman, E., Tan, F., Cha, E., Jax, S. A., Buxbaum, L. J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 23(1):51-63, January 2015 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Novel plasticity rule can explain the development of sensorimotor intelligence

Der, R., Martius, G.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(45):E6224-E6232, 2015 (article)

Abstract
Grounding autonomous behavior in the nervous system is a fundamental challenge for neuroscience. In particular, self-organized behavioral development provides more questions than answers. Are there special functional units for curiosity, motivation, and creativity? This paper argues that these features can be grounded in synaptic plasticity itself, without requiring any higher-level constructs. We propose differential extrinsic plasticity (DEP) as a new synaptic rule for self-learning systems and apply it to a number of complex robotic systems as a test case. Without specifying any purpose or goal, seemingly purposeful and adaptive rhythmic behavior is developed, displaying a certain level of sensorimotor intelligence. These surprising results require no system-specific modifications of the DEP rule. They rather arise from the underlying mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking, which is due to the tight brain body environment coupling. The new synaptic rule is biologically plausible and would be an interesting target for neurobiological investigation. We also argue that this neuronal mechanism may have been a catalyst in natural evolution.

al

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Quantifying Emergent Behavior of Autonomous Robots

Martius, G., Olbrich, E.

Entropy, 17(10):7266, 2015 (article)

al

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2010


no image
Lack of Discriminatory Function for Endoscopy Skills on a Computer-based Simulator

Kim, S., Spencer, G., Makar, G., Ahmad, N., Jaffe, D., Ginsberg, G., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Kochman, M.

Surgical Endoscopy, 24(12):3008-3015, December 2010 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

2010


[BibTex]


no image
Identifying the Role of Proprioception in Upper-Limb Prosthesis Control: Studies on Targeted Motion

Blank, A., Okamura, A. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, 7(3):1-23, June 2010 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Deep Graph Matching via Blackbox Differentiation of Combinatorial Solvers

Rolinek, M., Swoboda, P., Zietlow, D., Paulus, A., Musil, V., Martius, G.

Arxiv (article)

Abstract
Building on recent progress at the intersection of combinatorial optimization and deep learning, we propose an end-to-end trainable architecture for deep graph matching that contains unmodified combinatorial solvers. Using the presence of heavily optimized combinatorial solvers together with some improvements in architecture design, we advance state-of-the-art on deep graph matching benchmarks for keypoint correspondence. In addition, we highlight the conceptual advantages of incorporating solvers into deep learning architectures, such as the possibility of post-processing with a strong multi-graph matching solver or the indifference to changes in the training setting. Finally, we propose two new challenging experimental setups

al

Arxiv [BibTex]