Header logo is


2019


Soft-magnetic coatings as possible sensors for magnetic imaging of superconductors
Soft-magnetic coatings as possible sensors for magnetic imaging of superconductors

Ionescu, A., Simmendinger, J., Bihler, M., Miksch, C., Fischer, P., Soltan, S., Schütz, G., Albrecht, J.

Supercond. Sci. and Tech., 33, pages: 015002, IOP, December 2019 (article)

Abstract
Magnetic imaging of superconductors typically requires a soft-magnetic material placed on top of the superconductor to probe local magnetic fields. For reasonable results the influence of the magnet onto the superconductor has to be small. Thin YBCO films with soft-magnetic coatings are investigated using SQUID magnetometry. Detailed measurements of the magnetic moment as a function of temperature, magnetic field and time have been performed for different heterostructures. It is found that the modification of the superconducting transport in these heterostructures strongly depends on the magnetic and structural properties of the soft-magnetic material. This effect is especially pronounced for an inhomogeneous coating consisting of ferromagnetic nanoparticles.

pf mms

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2019


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
A semi-analytical model for dynamic analysis of non-uniform plates

Gozum, M. M., Serhat, G., Basdogan, I.

Applied Mathematical Modelling, 76, pages: 883–899, December 2019 (article)

Abstract
Dynamic properties of the plate structures can be enhanced by introducing discontinuities of different kinds such as using surface-bonded discrete patches or spatially varying the stiffness and mass properties of the plate. Fast and reliable design of such complex structures requires efficient and accurate modeling tools. In this study, a novel semi-analytical model is developed for the dynamic analysis of plates having discrete and/or continuous non-uniformities. Two-dimensional Heaviside unit step functions are utilized to represent the discontinuities. Different from existing numerical methods based on Heaviside functions, a numerical technique is proposed for modeling the discontinuities that are not necessarily aligned with the plate axes. The governing equations are derived using Hamilton's principle and Rayleigh–Ritz method is used for determining the modal variables. The surface-bonded patches are used to demonstrate discrete non-uniformities where variable-stiffness laminates are selected to represent continuous non-uniform structures. Natural frequencies and mode shapes obtained using the proposed method are validated with finite element analyses and the existing results from the literature. The results show that the developed model performs accurately and efficiently.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


A Robotic Framework to Facilitate Sensory Experiences for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Preliminary Study
A Robotic Framework to Facilitate Sensory Experiences for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Preliminary Study

Javed, H., Burns, R., Jeong, M., Howard, A. M., Park, C. H.

ACM Transactions on Human-Robot Interaction (THRI), 9(1), December 2019 (article)

Abstract
The diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in children is commonly accompanied by a diagnosis of sensory processing disorders. Abnormalities are usually reported in multiple sensory processing domains, showing a higher prevalence of unusual responses, particularly to tactile, auditory, and visual stimuli. This article discusses a novel robot-based framework designed to target sensory difficulties faced by children with ASD in a controlled setting. The setup consists of a number of sensory stations, together with two different robotic agents that navigate the stations and interact with the stimuli. These stimuli are designed to resemble real-world scenarios that form a common part of one’s everyday experiences. Given the strong interest of children with ASD in technology in general and robots in particular, we attempt to utilize our robotic platform to demonstrate socially acceptable responses to the stimuli in an interactive, pedagogical setting that encourages the child’s social, motor, and vocal skills, while providing a diverse sensory experience. A preliminary user study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed framework, with a total of 18 participants (5 with ASD and 13 typically developing) between the ages of 4 and 12 years. We derive a measure of social engagement, based on which we evaluate the effectiveness of the robots and sensory stations to identify key design features that can improve social engagement in children.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Hierarchical Task-Parameterized Learning from Demonstration for Collaborative Object Movement

Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Applied Bionics and Biomechanics, (9765383), December 2019 (article)

Abstract
Learning from demonstration (LfD) enables a robot to emulate natural human movement instead of merely executing preprogrammed behaviors. This article presents a hierarchical LfD structure of task-parameterized models for object movement tasks, which are ubiquitous in everyday life and could benefit from robotic support. Our approach uses the task-parameterized Gaussian mixture model (TP-GMM) algorithm to encode sets of demonstrations in separate models that each correspond to a different task situation. The robot then maximizes its expected performance in a new situation by either selecting a good existing model or requesting new demonstrations. Compared to a standard implementation that encodes all demonstrations together for all test situations, the proposed approach offers four advantages. First, a simply defined distance function can be used to estimate test performance by calculating the similarity between a test situation and the existing models. Second, the proposed approach can improve generalization, e.g., better satisfying the demonstrated task constraints and speeding up task execution. Third, because the hierarchical structure encodes each demonstrated situation individually, a wider range of task situations can be modeled in the same framework without deteriorating performance. Last, adding or removing demonstrations incurs low computational load, and thus, the robot’s skill library can be built incrementally. We first instantiate the proposed approach in a simulated task to validate these advantages. We then show that the advantages transfer to real hardware for a task where naive participants collaborated with a Willow Garage PR2 robot to move a handheld object. For most tested scenarios, our hierarchical method achieved significantly better task performance and subjective ratings than both a passive model with only gravity compensation and a single TP-GMM encoding all demonstrations.

hi

DOI [BibTex]


Acoustic hologram enhanced phased arrays for ultrasonic particle manipulation
Acoustic hologram enhanced phased arrays for ultrasonic particle manipulation

Cox, L., Melde, K., Croxford, A., Fischer, P., Drinkwater, B.

Phys. Rev. Applied, 12, pages: 064055, November 2019 (article)

Abstract
The ability to shape ultrasound fields is important for particle manipulation, medical therapeutics and imaging applications. If the amplitude and/or phase is spatially varied across the wavefront then it is possible to project ‘acoustic images’. When attempting to form an arbitrary desired static sound field, acoustic holograms are superior to phased arrays due to their significantly higher phase fidelity. However, they lack the dynamic flexibility of phased arrays. Here, we demonstrate how to combine the high-fidelity advantages of acoustic holograms with the dynamic control of phased arrays in the ultrasonic frequency range. Holograms are used with a 64-element phased array, driven with continuous excitation. Moving the position of the projected hologram via phase delays which steer the output beam is demonstrated experimentally. This allows the creation of a much more tightly focused point than with the phased array alone, whilst still being reconfigurable. It also allows the complex movement at a water-air interface of a “phase surfer” along a phase track or the manipulation of a more arbitrarily shaped particle via amplitude traps. Furthermore, a particle manipulation device with two emitters and a single split hologram is demonstrated that allows the positioning of a “phase surfer” along a 1D axis. This paper opens the door for new applications with complex manipulation of ultrasound whilst minimising the complexity and cost of the apparatus.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


A Helical Microrobot with an Optimized Propeller-Shape for Propulsion in Viscoelastic Biological Media
A Helical Microrobot with an Optimized Propeller-Shape for Propulsion in Viscoelastic Biological Media

Li., D., Jeong, M., Oren, E., Yu, T., Qiu, T.

Robotics, 8, pages: 87, MDPI, October 2019 (article)

Abstract
One major challenge for microrobots is to penetrate and effectively move through viscoelastic biological tissues. Most existing microrobots can only propel in viscous liquids. Recent advances demonstrate that sub-micron robots can actively penetrate nanoporous biological tissue, such as the vitreous of the eye. However, it is still difficult to propel a micron-sized device through dense biological tissue. Here, we report that a special twisted helical shape together with a high aspect ratio in cross-section permit a microrobot with a diameter of hundreds-of-micrometers to move through mouse liver tissue. The helical microrobot is driven by a rotating magnetic field and localized by ultrasound imaging inside the tissue. The twisted ribbon is made of molybdenum and a sharp tip is chemically etched to generate a higher pressure at the edge of the propeller to break the biopolymeric network of the dense tissue.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Acoustic Holographic Cell Patterning in a Biocompatible Hydrogel
Acoustic Holographic Cell Patterning in a Biocompatible Hydrogel

Ma, Z., Holle, A., Melde, K., Qiu, T., Poeppel, K., Kadiri, V., Fischer, P.

Adv. Mat., October 2019 (article)

Abstract
Acoustophoresis is promising as a rapid, biocompatible, non-contact cell manipulation method, where cells are arranged along the nodes or antinodes of the acoustic field. Typically, the acoustic field is formed in a resonator, which results in highly symmetric regular patterns. However, arbitrary, non-symmetrically shaped cell assemblies are necessary to obtain the irregular cellular arrangements found in biological tissues. We show that arbitrarily shaped cell patterns can be obtained from the complex acoustic field distribution defined by an acoustic hologram. Attenuation of the sound field induces localized acoustic streaming and the resultant convection flow gently delivers the suspended cells to the image plane where they form the designed pattern. We show that the process can be implemented in a biocompatible collagen solution, which can then undergo gelation to immobilize the cell pattern inside the viscoelastic matrix. The patterned cells exhibit F-actin-based protrusions, which indicates that the cells grow and thrive within the matrix. Cell viability assays and brightfield imaging after one week confirm cell survival and that the patterns persist. Acoustophoretic cell manipulation by holographic fields thus holds promise for non-contact, long-range, long-term cellular pattern formation, with a wide variety of potential applications in tissue engineering and mechanobiology.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Multi-objective optimization of composite plates using lamination parameters

Serhat, G., Basdogan, I.

Materials & Design, 180(107904), October 2019 (article)

Abstract
Laminated composite plates are extensively used in various industries due to their high stiffness-to-weight ratio and directional properties that allow optimization of the stiffness characteristics for specific applications. In multi-objective optimization problems, optimal designs for individual performance metrics may be conflicting, necessitating knowledge on the design requirements for different metrics and potential trade-offs. In this paper, a multi-objective design methodology for laminated composite plates with dynamic and load-carrying requirements is presented. Lamination parameters are used to characterize laminate stiffness matrices in a compact form resulting in a convex design space. Single and multi-objective optimization studies are carried out to determine the optimal stiffness properties. For improving the dynamic performance, maximization of the fundamental frequency metric is aimed. For enhancing the load-carrying capability, buckling load and equivalent stiffness metrics are maximized. Conforming and conflicting behavior of multiple objective functions for different plate geometries, boundary conditions and load cases are presented by determining Pareto-optimal solutions. The results provide a valuable insight for multi-objective optimization of laminated composite plates and show that presented methodology can be used in the design of such structures for improving the dynamic and load-carrying performance.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Arrays of plasmonic nanoparticle dimers with defined nanogap spacers
Arrays of plasmonic nanoparticle dimers with defined nanogap spacers

Jeong, H., Adams, M. C., Guenther, J., Alarcon-Correa, M., Kim, I., Choi, E., Miksch, C., Mark, A. F. M., Mark, A. G., Fischer, P.

ACS Nano, September 2019 (article)

Abstract
Plasmonic molecules are building blocks of metallic nanostructures that give rise to intriguing optical phenomena with similarities to those seen in molecular systems. The ability to design plasmonic hybrid structures and molecules with nanometric resolution would enable applications in optical metamaterials and sensing that presently cannot be demonstrated, because of a lack of suitable fabrication methods allowing the structural control of the plasmonic atoms on a large scale. Here we demonstrate a wafer-scale “lithography-free” parallel fabrication scheme to realize nanogap plasmonic meta-molecules with precise control over their size, shape, material, and orientation. We demonstrate how we can tune the corresponding coupled resonances through the entire visible spectrum. Our fabrication method, based on glancing angle physical vapor deposition with gradient shadowing, permits critical parameters to be varied across the wafer and thus is ideally suited to screen potential structures. We obtain billions of aligned dimer structures with controlled variation of the spectral properties across the wafer. We spectroscopically map the plasmonic resonances of gold dimer structures and show that they not only are in good agreement with numerically modeled spectra, but also remain functional, at least for a year, in ambient conditions.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Genetically modified M13 bacteriophage nanonets for enzyme catalysis and recovery
Genetically modified M13 bacteriophage nanonets for enzyme catalysis and recovery

Kadiri, V. M., Alarcon-Correa, M., Guenther, J. P., Ruppert, J., Bill, J., Rothenstein, D., Fischer, P.

Catalysts, 9, pages: 723, August 2019 (article)

Abstract
Enzyme-based biocatalysis exhibits multiple advantages over inorganic catalysts, including the biocompatibility and the unchallenged specificity of enzymes towards their substrate. The recovery and repeated use of enzymes is essential for any realistic application in biotechnology, but is not easily achieved with current strategies. For this purpose, enzymes are often immobilized on inorganic scaffolds, which could entail a reduction of the enzymes’ activity. Here, we show that immobilization to a nano-scaled biological scaffold, a nanonetwork of end-to-end cross-linked M13 bacteriophages, ensures high enzymatic activity and at the same time allows for the simple recovery of the enzymes. The bacteriophages have been genetically engineered to express AviTags at their ends, which permit biotinylation and their specific end-to-end self-assembly while allowing space on the major coat protein for enzyme coupling. We demonstrate that the phages form nanonetwork structures and that these so-called nanonets remain highly active even after re-using the nanonets multiple times in a flow-through reactor.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Light-controlled micromotors and soft microrobots
Light-controlled micromotors and soft microrobots

Palagi, S., Singh, D. P., Fischer, P.

Adv. Opt. Mat., 7, pages: 1900370, August 2019 (article)

Abstract
Mobile microscale devices and microrobots can be powered by catalytic reactions (chemical micromotors) or by external fields. This report is focused on the role of light as a versatile means for wirelessly powering and controlling such microdevices. Recent advances in the development of autonomous micromotors are discussed, where light permits their actuation with unprecedented control and thereby enables advances in the field of active matter. In addition, structuring the light field is a new means to drive soft microrobots that are based on (photo‐) responsive polymers. The behavior of the two main classes of thermo‐ and photoresponsive polymers adopted in microrobotics (poly(N‐isopropylacrylamide) and liquid‐crystal elastomers) is analyzed, and recent applications are reported. The advantages and limitations of controlling micromotors and microrobots by light are reviewed, and some of the remaining challenges in the development of novel photo‐active materials for micromotors and microrobots are discussed.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Low-Hysteresis and Low-Interference Soft Tactile Sensor Using a Conductive Coated Porous Elastomer and a Structure for Interference Reduction

Park, K., Kim, S., Lee, H., Park, I., Kim, J.

Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, 295, pages: 541-550, August 2019 (article)

Abstract
The need for soft whole-body tactile sensors is emerging. Piezoresistive materials are advantageous in terms of making large tactile sensors, but the hysteresis of piezoresistive materials is a major drawback. The hysteresis of a piezoresistive material should be attenuated to make a practical piezoresistive soft tactile sensor. In this paper, we introduce a low-hysteresis and low-interference soft tactile sensor using a conductive coated porous elastomer and a structure to reduce interference (grooves). The developed sensor exhibits low hysteresis because the transduction mechanism of the sensor is dominated by the contact between the conductive coated surface. In a cyclic loading experiment with different loading frequencies, the mechanical and piezoresistive hysteresis values of the sensor are less than 21.7% and 6.8%, respectively. The initial resistance change is found to be within 4% after the first loading cycle. To reduce the interference among the sensing points, we also propose a structure where the grooves are inserted between the adjacent electrodes. This structure is implemented during the molding process, which is adopted to extend the porous tactile sensor to large-scale and facile fabrication. The effects of the structure are investigated with respect to the normalized design parameters ΘD, ΘW, and ΘT in a simulation, and the result is validated for samples with the same design parameters. An indentation experiment also shows that the structure designed for interference reduction effectively attenuates the interference of the sensor array, indicating that the spatial resolution of the sensor array is improved. As a result, the sensor can exhibit low hysteresis and low interference simultaneously. This research can be used for many applications, such as robotic skin, grippers, and wearable devices.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Lamination parameter interpolation method for design of manufacturable variable-stiffness composite panels

Serhat, G., Basdogan, I.

AIAA Journal, 57(7):3052–3065, July 2019 (article)

Abstract
Variable-stiffness laminates have lately drawn attention because they offer potential for additional structural performance improvements. In the optimization studies, laminate stiffness properties can be described efficiently by using lamination parameters, which is a well-established formulation for constant-stiffness laminates. However, ensuring manufacturability in the design of variable-stiffness laminates with lamination parameters is difficult. In this paper, a novel method for the design of variable-stiffness composite panels using lamination parameters is proposed. The method constrains the design space by controlling the magnitude and direction of change for the lamination parameters, and subsequently leads to a smooth change in the fiber angles. The method is used to maximize the fundamental frequencies of several panels as example cases. The solutions are calculated for various panel geometries and boundary conditions using the developed finite element analysis software. After finding optimal lamination parameter distributions, corresponding discrete fiber angles and fiber paths are retrieved, and the minimum radii of curvature are calculated. The results demonstrate that the proposed design method provides manufacturable smooth fiber paths while using the compact stiffness formulation feature of lamination parameters.

hi

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Physical activity in non-ambulatory toddlers with cerebral palsy

M.Orlando, J., Pierce, S., Mohan, M., Skorup, J., Paremski, A., Bochnak, M., Prosser, L. A.

Research in Developmental Disabilities, 90, pages: 51-58, July 2019 (article)

Abstract
Background: Children with cerebral palsy are less likely to be physically active than their peers, however there is limited evidence regarding self-initiated physical activity in toddlers who are not able, or who may never be able, to walk. Aims: The aim of this study was to measure self-initiated physical activity and its relationship to gross motor function and participation in non-ambulatory toddlers with cerebral palsy. Methods and procedures: Participants were between the ages of 1–3 years. Physical activity during independent floor-play at home was recorded using a wearable tri-axial accelerometer worn on the child’s thigh. The Gross Motor Function Measure-66 and the Child Engagement in Daily Life, a parent-reported questionnaire of participation, were administered. Outcomes and results: Data were analyzed from the twenty participants who recorded at least 90 min of floor-play (mean: 229 min), resulting in 4598 total floor-play minutes. The relationship between physical activity and gross motor function was not statistically significant (r = 0.20; p = 0.39), nor were the relationships between physical activity and participation (r = 0.05−0.09; p = 0.71−0.84). Conclusions and implications: The results suggest physical activity during floor-play is not related to gross motor function or participation in non-ambulatory toddlers with cerebral palsy. Clinicians and researchers should independently measure physical activity, gross motor function, and participation.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Implementation of a 6-{DOF} Parallel Continuum Manipulator for Delivering Fingertip Tactile Cues
Implementation of a 6-DOF Parallel Continuum Manipulator for Delivering Fingertip Tactile Cues

Young, E. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 12(3):295-306, June 2019 (article)

Abstract
Existing fingertip haptic devices can deliver different subsets of tactile cues in a compact package, but we have not yet seen a wearable six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) display. This paper presents the Fuppeteer (short for Fingertip Puppeteer), a device that is capable of controlling the position and orientation of a flat platform, such that any combination of normal and shear force can be delivered at any location on any human fingertip. We build on our previous work of designing a parallel continuum manipulator for fingertip haptics by presenting a motorized version in which six flexible Nitinol wires are actuated via independent roller mechanisms and proportional-derivative controllers. We evaluate the settling time and end-effector vibrations observed during system responses to step inputs. After creating a six-dimensional lookup table and adjusting simulated inputs using measured Jacobians, we show that the device can make contact with all parts of the fingertip with a mean error of 1.42 mm. Finally, we present results from a human-subject study. A total of 24 users discerned 9 evenly distributed contact locations with an average accuracy of 80.5%. Translational and rotational shear cues were identified reasonably well near the center of the fingertip and more poorly around the edges.

hi

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


no image
How Does It Feel to Clap Hands with a Robot?

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

International Journal of Social Robotics, 12(1):113-127, April 2019 (article)

Abstract
Future robots may need lighthearted physical interaction capabilities to connect with people in meaningful ways. To begin exploring how users perceive playful human–robot hand-to-hand interaction, we conducted a study with 20 participants. Each user played simple hand-clapping games with the Rethink Robotics Baxter Research Robot during a 1-h-long session involving 24 randomly ordered conditions that varied in facial reactivity, physical reactivity, arm stiffness, and clapping tempo. Survey data and experiment recordings demonstrate that this interaction is viable: all users successfully completed the experiment and mentioned enjoying at least one game without prompting. Hand-clapping tempo was highly salient to users, and human-like robot errors were more widely accepted than mechanical errors. Furthermore, perceptions of Baxter varied in the following statistically significant ways: facial reactivity increased the robot’s perceived pleasantness and energeticness; physical reactivity decreased pleasantness, energeticness, and dominance; higher arm stiffness increased safety and decreased dominance; and faster tempo increased energeticness and increased dominance. These findings can motivate and guide roboticists who want to design social–physical human–robot interactions.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Self-Assembled Phage-Based Colloids for High Localized Enzymatic Activity
Self-Assembled Phage-Based Colloids for High Localized Enzymatic Activity

Alarcon-Correa, M., Guenther, J., Troll, J., Kadiri, V. M., Bill, J., Fischer, P., Rothenstein, D.

ACS Nano, March 2019 (article)

Abstract
Catalytically active colloids are model systems for chemical motors and active matter. It is desirable to replace the inorganic catalysts and the toxic fuels that are often used, with biocompatible enzymatic reactions. However, compared to inorganic catalysts, enzyme-coated colloids tend to exhibit less activity. Here, we show that the self-assembly of genetically engineered M13 bacteriophages that bind enzymes to magnetic beads ensures high and localized enzymatic activity. These phage-decorated colloids provide a proteinaceous environment for directed enzyme immobilization. The magnetic properties of the colloidal carrier particle permit repeated enzyme recovery from a reaction solution, while the enzymatic activity is retained. Moreover, localizing the phage-based construct with a magnetic field in a microcontainer allows the enzyme-phage-colloids to function as an enzymatic micropump, where the enzymatic reaction generates a fluid flow. This system shows the fastest fluid flow reported to date by a biocompatible enzymatic micropump. In addition, it is functional in complex media including blood where the enzyme driven micropump can be powered at the physiological blood-urea concentration.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Absolute diffusion measurements of active enzyme solutions by NMR
Absolute diffusion measurements of active enzyme solutions by NMR

Guenther, J., Majer, G., Fischer, P.

J. Chem. Phys., 150(124201), March 2019 (article)

Abstract
The diffusion of enzymes is of fundamental importance for many biochemical processes. Enhanced or directed enzyme diffusion can alter the accessibility of substrates and the organization of enzymes within cells. Several studies based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) report enhanced diffusion of enzymes upon interaction with their substrate or inhibitor. In this context, major importance is given to the enzyme fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, for which enhanced diffusion has been reported even though the catalysed reaction is endothermic. Additionally, enhanced diffusion of tracer particles surrounding the active aldolase enzymes has been reported. These studies suggest that active enzymes can act as chemical motors that self-propel and give rise to enhanced diffusion. However, fluorescence studies of enzymes can, despite several advantages, suffer from artefacts. Here we show that the absolute diffusion coefficients of active enzyme solutions can be determined with Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG-NMR). The advantage of PFG-NMR is that the motion of the molecule of interest is directly observed in its native state without the need for any labelling. Further, PFG-NMR is model-free and thus yields absolute diffusion constants. Our PFG-NMR experiments of solutions containing active fructose-bisphosphate aldolase from rabbit muscle do not show any diffusion enhancement for the active enzymes nor the surrounding molecules. Additionally, we do not observe any diffusion enhancement of aldolase in the presence of its inhibitor pyrophosphate.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Chemical Nanomotors at the Gram Scale Form a Dense Active Optorheological Medium
Chemical Nanomotors at the Gram Scale Form a Dense Active Optorheological Medium

Choudhury, U., Singh, D. P., Qiu, T., Fischer, P.

Adv. Mat., (1807382), Febuary 2019 (article)

Abstract
The rheological properties of a colloidal suspension are a function of the concentration of the colloids and their interactions. While suspensions of passive colloids are well studied and have been shown to form crystals, gels, and glasses, examples of energy‐consuming “active” colloidal suspensions are still largely unexplored. Active suspensions of biological matter, such as motile bacteria or dense mixtures of active actin–motor–protein mixtures have, respectively, reveals superfluid‐like and gel‐like states. Attractive inanimate systems for active matter are chemically self‐propelled particles. It has so far been challenging to use these swimming particles at high enough densities to affect the bulk material properties of the suspension. Here, it is shown that light‐triggered asymmetric titanium dioxide that self‐propel, can be obtained in large quantities, and self‐organize to make a gram‐scale active medium. The suspension shows an activity‐dependent tenfold reversible change in its bulk viscosity.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


First Observation of Optical Activity in Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering
First Observation of Optical Activity in Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering

Collins, J., Rusimova, K., Hooper, D., Jeong, H. H., Ohnoutek, L., Pradaux-Caggiano, F., Verbiest, T., Carbery, D., Fischer, P., Valev, V.

Phys. Rev. X, 9(011024), January 2019 (article)

Abstract
Chiral nano- or metamaterials and surfaces enable striking photonic properties, such as negative refractive index and superchiral light, driving promising applications in novel optical components, nanorobotics, and enhanced chiral molecular interactions with light. In characterizing chirality, although nonlinear chiroptical techniques are typically much more sensitive than their linear optical counterparts, separating true chirality from anisotropy is a major challenge. Here, we report the first observation of optical activity in second-harmonic hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS). We demonstrate the effect in a 3D isotropic suspension of Ag nanohelices in water. The effect is 5 orders of magnitude stronger than linear optical activity and is well pronounced above the multiphoton luminescence background. Because of its sensitivity, isotropic environment, and straightforward experimental geometry, HRS optical activity constitutes a fundamental experimental breakthrough in chiral photonics for media including nanomaterials, metamaterials, and chemical molecules.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
The Perception of Ultrasonic Square Reductions of Friction With Variable Sharpness and Duration

Gueorguiev, D., Vezzoli, E., Sednaoui, T., Grisoni, L., Lemaire-Semail, B.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 12(2):179-188, January 2019 (article)

Abstract
The human perception of square ultrasonic modulation of the finger-surface friction was investigated during active tactile exploration by using short frictional cues of varying duration and sharpness. In a first experiment, we asked participants to discriminate the transition time and duration of short square ultrasonic reductions of friction. They proved very sensitive to discriminate millisecond differences in these two parameters with the average psychophysical thresholds being 2.3–2.4 ms for both parameters. A second experiment focused on the perception of square friction reductions with variable transition times and durations. We found that for durations of the stimulation larger than 90 ms, participants often perceived three or four edges when only two stimulations were presented while they consistently felt two edges for signals shorter than 50 ms. A subsequent analysis of the contact forces induced by these ultrasonic stimulations during slow and fast active exploration showed that two identical consecutive ultrasonic pulses can induce significantly different frictional dynamics especially during fast motion of the finger. These results confirm the human sensitivity to transient frictional cues and suggest that the human perception of square reductions of friction can depend on their sharpness and duration as well as on the speed of exploration.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Tactile Roughness Perception of Virtual Gratings by Electrovibration
Tactile Roughness Perception of Virtual Gratings by Electrovibration

Isleyen, A., Vardar, Y., Basdogan, C.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 2019 (article) Accepted

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2016


Wireless actuation with functional acoustic surfaces
Wireless actuation with functional acoustic surfaces

Qiu, T., Palagi, S., Mark, A. G., Melde, K., Adams, F., Fischer, P.

Appl. Phys. Lett., 109(19):191602, November 2016, APL Editor's pick. APL News. (article)

Abstract
Miniaturization calls for micro-actuators that can be powered wirelessly and addressed individually. Here, we develop functional surfaces consisting of arrays of acoustically resonant microcavities, and we demonstrate their application as two-dimensional wireless actuators. When remotely powered by an acoustic field, the surfaces provide highly directional propulsive forces in fluids through acoustic streaming. A maximal force of similar to 0.45mN is measured on a 4 x 4 mm(2) functional surface. The response of the surfaces with bubbles of different sizes is characterized experimentally. This shows a marked peak around the micro-bubbles' resonance frequency, as estimated by both an analytical model and numerical simulations. The strong frequency dependence can be exploited to address different surfaces with different acoustic frequencies, thus achieving wireless actuation with multiple degrees of freedom. The use of the functional surfaces as wireless ready-to-attach actuators is demonstrated by implementing a wireless and bidirectional miniaturized rotary motor, which is 2.6 x 2.6 x 5 mm(3) in size and generates a stall torque of similar to 0.5 mN.mm. The adoption of micro-structured surfaces as wireless actuators opens new possibilities in the development of miniaturized devices and tools for fluidic environments that are accessible by low intensity ultrasound fields.

pf

link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2016


link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Nanomotors
Nanomotors

Alarcon-Correa, M., Walker (Schamel), D., Qiu, T., Fischer, P.

Eur. Phys. J.-Special Topics, 225(11-12):2241-2254, November 2016 (article)

Abstract
This minireview discusses whether catalytically active macromolecules and abiotic nanocolloids, that are smaller than motile bacteria, can self-propel. Kinematic reversibility at low Reynolds number demands that self-propelling colloids must break symmetry. Methods that permit the synthesis and fabrication of Janus nanocolloids are therefore briefly surveyed, as well as means that permit the analysis of the nanocolloids' motion. Finally, recent work is reviewed which shows that nanoagents are small enough to penetrate the complex inhomogeneous polymeric network of biological fluids and gels, which exhibit diverse rheological behaviors.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Structured light enables biomimetic swimming and versatile locomotion of photoresponsive soft microrobots
Structured light enables biomimetic swimming and versatile locomotion of photoresponsive soft microrobots

Palagi, S., Mark, A. G., Reigh, S. Y., Melde, K., Qiu, T., Zeng, H., Parmeggiani, C., Martella, D., Sanchez-Castillo, A., Kapernaum, N., Giesselmann, F., Wiersma, D. S., Lauga, E., Fischer, P.

Nature Materials, 15(6):647–653, November 2016, Max Planck press release, Nature News & Views. (article)

Abstract
Microorganisms move in challenging environments by periodic changes in body shape. In contrast, current artificial microrobots cannot actively deform, exhibiting at best passive bending under external fields. Here, by taking advantage of the wireless, scalable and spatiotemporally selective capabilities that light allows, we show that soft microrobots consisting of photoactive liquid-crystal elastomers can be driven by structured monochromatic light to perform sophisticated biomimetic motions. We realize continuum yet selectively addressable artificial microswimmers that generate travelling-wave motions to self-propel without external forces or torques, as well as microrobots capable of versatile locomotion behaviours on demand. Both theoretical predictions and experimental results confirm that multiple gaits, mimicking either symplectic or antiplectic metachrony of ciliate protozoa, can be achieved with single microswimmers. The principle of using structured light can be extended to other applications that require microscale actuation with sophisticated spatiotemporal coordination for advanced microrobotic technologies.

pf

Video - Soft photo Micro-Swimmer DOI [BibTex]

Video - Soft photo Micro-Swimmer DOI [BibTex]


no image
An electro-active polymer based lens module for dynamically varying focal system

Yun, S., Park, S., Nam, S., Park, B., Park, S. K., Mun, S., Lim, J. M., Kyung, K.

Applied Physics Letters, 109(14):141908, October 2016 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate a polymer-based active-lens module allowing a dynamic focus controllable optical system with a wide tunable range. The active-lens module is composed of parallelized two active- lenses with a convex and a concave shaped hemispherical lens structure, respectively. Under opera- tion with dynamic input voltage signals, each active-lens produces translational movement bi-directionally responding to a hybrid driving force that is a combination of an electro-active response of a thin dielectric elastomer membrane and an electro-static attraction force. Since the proposed active lens module widely modulates a gap-distance between lens-elements, an optical system based on the active-lens module provides widely-variable focusing for selective imaging of objects in arbitrary position.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Wrinkle structures formed by formulating UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers

Park, S. K., Kwark, Y., Nam, S., Park, S., Park, B., Yun, S., Moon, J., Lee, J., Yu, B., Kyung, K.

Polymer, 99, pages: 447-452, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Artificial wrinkles have recently been in the spotlight due to their potential use in high-tech applications. A spontaneously wrinkled film can be fabricated from UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers. Here, we controlled the wrinkle formation by simply formulating two UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers, tetraethylene glycol bis(4-ethenyl-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl) ether (TEGDSt) and tetraethylene glycol diacrylate (TEGDA). The wrinkles were formed from the TEGDSt/TEGDA formulated prepolymer layers containing up to 30 wt% of TEGDA. The wrinkle formation depended upon the rate of photo-crosslinking reaction of the formulated prepolymers. The first order apparent rate constant, kapp, was between ca. 5.7 × 10−3 and 12.2 × 10−3 s−1 for the wrinkle formation. The wrinkle structures were modulated within the kapp mainly due to variation in the extent of shrinkage of the formulated prepolymer layers with the content of TEGDA

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Capture of 2D Microparticle Arrays via a UV-Triggered Thiol-yne ``Click{''} Reaction
Capture of 2D Microparticle Arrays via a UV-Triggered Thiol-yne “Click” Reaction

Walker (Schamel), D., Singh, D. P., Fischer, P.

Advanced Materials, 28(44):9846-9850, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Immobilization of colloidal assemblies onto solid supports via a fast UV-triggered click-reaction is achieved. Transient assemblies of microparticles and colloidal materials can be captured and transferred to solid supports. The technique does not require complex reaction conditions, and is compatible with a variety of particle assembly methods.

pf

DOI [BibTex]


Magnesium plasmonics for UV applications and chiral sensing
Magnesium plasmonics for UV applications and chiral sensing

Jeong, H. H., Mark, A. G., Fischer, P.

Chem. Comm., 52(82):12179-12182, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate that chiral magnesium nanoparticles show remarkable plasmonic extinction- and chiroptical-effects in the ultraviolet region. The Mg nanohelices possess an enhanced local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensitivity due to the strong dispersion of most substances in the UV region.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Holograms for acoustics
Holograms for acoustics

Melde, K., Mark, A. G., Qiu, T., Fischer, P.

Nature, 537, pages: 518-522, September 2016, Max Planck press release, Nature News & Views, Nature Video. (article)

Abstract
Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays(1), high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical(2) or acoustic fields(3,4) within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront(5,6) in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography(7) skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources(3,4,8-12); however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

pf

Video - Holograms for Sound DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Video - Holograms for Sound DOI Project Page [BibTex]


A loop-gap resonator for chirality-sensitive nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER)
A loop-gap resonator for chirality-sensitive nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER)

Garbacz, P., Fischer, P., Kraemer, S.

J. Chem. Phys., 145(10):104201, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Direct detection of molecular chirality is practically impossible by methods of standard nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that is based on interactions involving magnetic-dipole and magnetic-field operators. However, theoretical studies provide a possible direct probe of chirality by exploiting an enantiomer selective additional coupling involving magnetic-dipole, magnetic-field, and electric field operators. This offers a way for direct experimental detection of chirality by nuclear magneto-electric resonance (NMER). This method uses both resonant magnetic and electric radiofrequency (RF) fields. The weakness of the chiral interaction though requires a large electric RF field and a small transverse RF magnetic field over the sample volume, which is a non-trivial constraint. In this study, we present a detailed study of the NMER concept and a possible experimental realization based on a loop-gap resonator. For this original device, the basic principle and numerical studies as well as fabrication and measurements of the frequency dependence of the scattering parameter are reported. By simulating the NMER spin dynamics for our device and taking the F-19 NMER signal of enantiomer-pure 1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-ol, we predict a chirality induced NMER signal that accounts for 1%-5% of the standard achiral NMR signal. Published by AIP Publishing.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Active Nanorheology with Plasmonics
Active Nanorheology with Plasmonics

Jeong, H. H., Mark, A. G., Lee, T., Alarcon-Correa, M., Eslami, S., Qiu, T., Gibbs, J. G., Fischer, P.

Nano Letters, 16(8):4887-4894, July 2016 (article)

Abstract
Nanoplasmonic systems are valued for their strong optical response and their small size. Most plasmonic sensors and systems to date have been rigid and passive. However, rendering these structures dynamic opens new possibilities for applications. Here we demonstrate that dynamic plasmonic nanoparticles can be used as mechanical sensors to selectively probe the rheological properties of a fluid in situ at the nanoscale and in microscopic volumes. We fabricate chiral magneto-plasmonic nanocolloids that can be actuated by an external magnetic field, which in turn allows for the direct and fast modulation of their distinct optical response. The method is robust and allows nanorheological measurements with a mechanical sensitivity of similar to 0.1 cP, even in strongly absorbing fluids with an optical density of up to OD similar to 3 (similar to 0.1% light transmittance) and in the presence of scatterers (e.g., 50% v/v red blood cells).

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Objective assessment of robotic surgical skill using instrument contact vibrations

Gomez, E. D., Aggarwal, R., McMahan, W., Bark, K., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 30(4):1419-1431, 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Dispersion and shape engineered plasmonic nanosensors
Dispersion and shape engineered plasmonic nanosensors

Jeong, H. H., Mark, A. G., Alarcon-Correa, M., Kim, I., Oswald, P., Lee, T. C., Fischer, P.

Nature Communications, 7, pages: 11331, March 2016 (article)

Abstract
Biosensors based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of individual metallic nanoparticles promise to deliver modular, low-cost sensing with high-detection thresholds. However, they continue to suffer from relatively low sensitivity and figures of merit (FOMs). Herein we introduce the idea of sensitivity enhancement of LSPR sensors through engineering of the material dispersion function. Employing dispersion and shape engineering of chiral nanoparticles leads to remarkable refractive index sensitivities (1,091 nmRIU(-1) at lambda = 921 nm) and FOMs (>2,800 RIU-1). A key feature is that the polarization-dependent extinction of the nanoparticles is now characterized by rich spectral features, including bipolar peaks and nulls, suitable for tracking refractive index changes. This sensing modality offers strong optical contrast even in the presence of highly absorbing media, an important consideration for use in complex biological media with limited transmission. The technique is sensitive to surface-specific binding events which we demonstrate through biotin-avidin surface coupling.

pf

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Cutaneous Feedback of Fingertip Deformation and Vibration for Palpation in Robotic Surgery

Pacchierotti, C., Prattichizzo, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 63(2):278-287, February 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control

Nam, S., Park, S., Yun, S., Park, B., Park, S. K., Kyung, K.

Optics Express, 24(1):55-66, OSA, January 2016 (article)

Abstract
We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles
Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

Maier, A. M., Weig, C., Oswald, P., Frey, E., Fischer, P., Liedl, T.

Nano Letters, 16(2):906-910, January 2016 (article)

Abstract
We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Peripheral vs. central determinants of vibrotactile adaptation

Klöcker, A., Gueorguiev, D., Thonnard, J. L., Mouraux, A.

Journal of Neurophysiology, 115(2):685-691, 2016, PMID: 26581868 (article)

Abstract
Long-lasting mechanical vibrations applied to the skin induce a reversible decrease in the perception of vibration at the stimulated skin site. This phenomenon of vibrotactile adaptation has been studied extensively, yet there is still no clear consensus on the mechanisms leading to vibrotactile adaptation. In particular, the respective contributions of 1) changes affecting mechanical skin impedance, 2) peripheral processes, and 3) central processes are largely unknown. Here we used direct electrical stimulation of nerve fibers to bypass mechanical transduction processes and thereby explore the possible contribution of central vs. peripheral processes to vibrotactile adaptation. Three experiments were conducted. In the first, adaptation was induced with mechanical vibration of the fingertip (51- or 251-Hz vibration delivered for 8 min, at 40× detection threshold). In the second, we attempted to induce adaptation with transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the median nerve (51- or 251-Hz constant-current pulses delivered for 8 min, at 1.5× detection threshold). Vibrotactile detection thresholds were measured before and after adaptation. Mechanical stimulation induced a clear increase of vibrotactile detection thresholds. In contrast, thresholds were unaffected by electrical stimulation. In the third experiment, we assessed the effect of mechanical adaptation on the detection thresholds to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimuli, measured before and after adaptation. Electrical detection thresholds were unaffected by the mechanical adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that vibrotactile adaptation is predominantly the consequence of peripheral mechanoreceptor processes and/or changes in biomechanical properties of the skin.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Silent Expectations: Dynamic Causal Modeling of Cortical Prediction and Attention to Sounds That Weren’t

Chennu, S., Noreika, V., Gueorguiev, D., Shtyrov, Y., Bekinschtein, T. A., Henson, R.

Journal of Neuroscience, 36(32):8305-8316, Society for Neuroscience, 2016 (article)

Abstract
There is increasing evidence that human perception is realized by a hierarchy of neural processes in which predictions sent backward from higher levels result in prediction errors that are fed forward from lower levels, to update the current model of the environment. Moreover, the precision of prediction errors is thought to be modulated by attention. Much of this evidence comes from paradigms in which a stimulus differs from that predicted by the recent history of other stimuli (generating a so-called {\textquotedblleft}mismatch response{\textquotedblright}). There is less evidence from situations where a prediction is not fulfilled by any sensory input (an {\textquotedblleft}omission{\textquotedblright} response). This situation arguably provides a more direct measure of {\textquotedblleft}top-down{\textquotedblright} predictions in the absence of confounding {\textquotedblleft}bottom-up{\textquotedblright} input. We applied Dynamic Causal Modeling of evoked electromagnetic responses recorded by EEG and MEG to an auditory paradigm in which we factorially crossed the presence versus absence of {\textquotedblleft}bottom-up{\textquotedblright} stimuli with the presence versus absence of {\textquotedblleft}top-down{\textquotedblright} attention. Model comparison revealed that both mismatch and omission responses were mediated by increased forward and backward connections, differing primarily in the driving input. In both responses, modeling results suggested that the presence of attention selectively modulated backward {\textquotedblleft}prediction{\textquotedblright} connections. Our results provide new model-driven evidence of the pure top-down prediction signal posited in theories of hierarchical perception, and highlight the role of attentional precision in strengthening this prediction.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human auditory perception is thought to be realized by a network of neurons that maintain a model of and predict future stimuli. Much of the evidence for this comes from experiments where a stimulus unexpectedly differs from previous ones, which generates a well-known {\textquotedblleft}mismatch response.{\textquotedblright} But what happens when a stimulus is unexpectedly omitted altogether? By measuring the brain{\textquoteright}s electromagnetic activity, we show that it also generates an {\textquotedblleft}omission response{\textquotedblright} that is contingent on the presence of attention. We model these responses computationally, revealing that mismatch and omission responses only differ in the location of inputs into the same underlying neuronal network. In both cases, we show that attention selectively strengthens the brain{\textquoteright}s prediction of the future.

hi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Touch uses frictional cues to discriminate flat materials

Gueorguiev, D., Bochereau, S., Mouraux, A., Hayward, V., Thonnard, J.

Scientific reports, 6, pages: 25553, Nature Publishing Group, 2016 (article)

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2009


Full phase and amplitude control in computer-generated holography
Full phase and amplitude control in computer-generated holography

Fratz, M., Fischer, P., Giel, D. M.

OPTICS LETTERS, 34(23):3659-3661, 2009 (article)

Abstract
We report what we believe to be the first realization of a computer-generated complex-valued hologram recorded in a single film of photoactive polymer. Complex-valued holograms give rise to a diffracted optical field with control over its amplitude and phase. The holograms are generated by a one-step direct laser writing process in which a spatial light modulator (SLM) is imaged onto a polymer film. Temporal modulation of the SLM during exposure controls both the strength of the induced birefringence and the orientation of the fast axis. We demonstrate that complex holograms can be used to impart arbitrary amplitude and phase profiles onto a beam and thereby open new possibilities in the control of optical beams. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America

pf

[BibTex]

2009


[BibTex]


Digital polarization holograms with defined magnitude and orientation of each pixel's birefringence
Digital polarization holograms with defined magnitude and orientation of each pixel’s birefringence

Fratz, M., Giel, D. M., Fischer, P.

OPTICS LETTERS, 34(8):1270-1272, 2009 (article)

Abstract
A new form of digital polarization holography is demonstrated that permits both the amplitude and the phase of a diffracted beam to be independently controlled. This permits two independent intensity images to be stored in the same hologram. To fabricate the holograms, a birefringence with defined retardance and orientation of the fast axis is recorded into a photopolymer film. The holograms are selectively read out by choosing the polarization state of the read beam. Polarization holograms of this kind increase the data density in holographic data storage and allow higher quality diffractive optical elements to be written. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America

pf

[BibTex]


Controlled Propulsion of Artificial Magnetic Nanostructured Propellers
Controlled Propulsion of Artificial Magnetic Nanostructured Propellers

Ghosh, A., Fischer, P.

NANO LETTERS, 9(6):2243-2245, 2009, Featured highlight ‘Nanotechnology: The helix that delivers’ Nature 459, 13 (2009). (article)

Abstract
For biomedical applications, such as targeted drug delivery and microsurgery, it is essential to develop a system of swimmers that can be propelled wirelessly in fluidic environments with good control. Here, we report the construction and operation of chiral colloidal propellers that can be navigated in water with micrometer-level precision using homogeneous magnetic fields. The propellers are made via nanostructured surfaces and can be produced in large numbers. The nanopropellers can carry chemicals, push loads, and act as local probes in rheological measurements.

Featured highlight ‘Nanotechnology: The helix that delivers’ Nature 459, 13 (2009).

pf

Video - Nanospropellers DOI [BibTex]

Video - Nanospropellers DOI [BibTex]


Absolute Asymmetric Reduction Based on the Relative Orientation of Achiral Reactants
Absolute Asymmetric Reduction Based on the Relative Orientation of Achiral Reactants

Kuhn, A., Fischer, P.

ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION, 48(37):6857-6860, 2009 (article)

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2007


Frequency-domain displacement sensing with a fiber ring-resonator containing a variable gap
Frequency-domain displacement sensing with a fiber ring-resonator containing a variable gap

Vollmer, F., Fischer, P.

SENSORS AND ACTUATORS A-PHYSICAL, 134(2):410-413, 2007 (article)

Abstract
Ring-resonators are in general not amenable to strain-free (non-contact) displacement measurements. We show that this limitation may be overcome if the ring-resonator, here a fiber-loop, is designed to contain a gap, such that the light traverses a free-space part between two aligned waveguide ends. Displacements are determined with nanometer sensitivity by measuring the associated changes in the resonance frequencies. Miniaturization should increase the sensitivity of the ring-resonator interferometer. Ring geometries that contain an optical circulator can be used to profile reflective samples. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

2007


DOI [BibTex]


Observation of the Faraday effect via beam deflection in a longitudinal magnetic field
Observation of the Faraday effect via beam deflection in a longitudinal magnetic field

Ghosh, A., Hill, W., Fischer, P.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 76(5), 2007 (article)

Abstract
We show that magnetic-field-induced circular differential deflection of light can be observed in reflection or refraction at a single interface. The difference in the reflection or refraction angles between the two circular polarization components is a function of the magnetic-field strength and the Verdet constant, and permits the observation of the Faraday effect not via polarization rotation in transmission, but via changes in the propagation direction. Deflection measurements do not suffer from n-pi ambiguities and are shown to be another means to map magnetic fields with high axial resolution, or to determine the sign and magnitude of magnetic-field pulses in a single measurement.

pf

DOI [BibTex]


Circular differential double diffraction in chiral media
Circular differential double diffraction in chiral media

Ghosh, A., Fazal, F. M., Fischer, P.

OPTICS LETTERS, 32(13):1836-1838, 2007 (article)

Abstract
In an optically active liquid the diffraction angle depends on the circular polarization state of the incident light beam. We report the observation of circular differential diffraction in an isotropic chiral medium, and we demonstrate that double diffraction is an alternate means to determine the handedness (enantiomeric excess) of a solution. (c) 2007 Optical Society of America.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2003


New electro-optic effect: Sum-frequency generation from optically active liquids in the presence of a dc electric field
New electro-optic effect: Sum-frequency generation from optically active liquids in the presence of a dc electric field

Fischer, P., Buckingham, A., Beckwitt, K., Wiersma, D., Wise, F.

PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, 91(17), 2003 (article)

Abstract
We report the observation of sum-frequency signals that depend linearly on an applied electrostatic field and that change sign with the handedness of an optically active solute. This recently predicted chiral electro-optic effect exists in the electric-dipole approximation. The static electric field gives rise to an electric-field-induced sum-frequency signal (an achiral third-order process) that interferes with the chirality-specific sum-frequency at second order. The cross-terms linear in the electrostatic field constitute the effect and may be used to determine the absolute sign of second- and third-order nonlinear-optical susceptibilities in isotropic media.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

2003


DOI [BibTex]


Chiral and achiral contributions to sum-frequency generation from optically active solutions of binaphthol
Chiral and achiral contributions to sum-frequency generation from optically active solutions of binaphthol

Fischer, P., Wise, F., Albrecht, A.

JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY A, 107(40):8232-8238, 2003 (article)

Abstract
The nonlinear sum- and difference-frequency generation spectroscopies can be probes of molecular chirality in optically active systems. We present a tensorial analysis of the chirality-specific electric-dipolar sum-frequency-generation susceptibility and the achiral electric-quadrupolar and magnetic-dipolar nonlinearities at second order in isotropic media. The chiral and achiral contributions to the sum-frequency signal from the bulk of optically active solutions of 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (2,2'-dehydroxy-1,1'-binaphthyl) can be distinguished, and the former dominates. Ab initio computations reveal the dramatic resonance enhancement that the isotropic component of the electric-dipolar three-wave mixing hyperpolarizability experiences. Away from resonance its magnitude rapidly decreases, as-unlike the vector component-it is zero in the static limit. The dispersion of the first hyperpolarizability is computed by a configuration interaction singles sum-over-states approach with explicit regard to the Franck-Condon active vibrational substructure for all resonant electronic states.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]