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2016


Skinned multi-person linear model
Skinned multi-person linear model

Black, M.J., Loper, M., Mahmood, N., Pons-Moll, G., Romero, J.

December 2016, Application PCT/EP2016/064610 (misc)

Abstract
The invention comprises a learned model of human body shape and pose dependent shape variation that is more accurate than previous models and is compatible with existing graphics pipelines. Our Skinned Multi-Person Linear model (SMPL) is a skinned vertex based model that accurately represents a wide variety of body shapes in natural human poses. The parameters of the model are learned from data including the rest pose template, blend weights, pose-dependent blend shapes, identity- dependent blend shapes, and a regressor from vertices to joint locations. Unlike previous models, the pose-dependent blend shapes are a linear function of the elements of the pose rotation matrices. This simple formulation enables training the entire model from a relatively large number of aligned 3D meshes of different people in different poses. The invention quantitatively evaluates variants of SMPL using linear or dual- quaternion blend skinning and show that both are more accurate than a Blend SCAPE model trained on the same data. In a further embodiment, the invention realistically models dynamic soft-tissue deformations. Because it is based on blend skinning, SMPL is compatible with existing rendering engines and we make it available for research purposes.

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Google Patents [BibTex]

2016


Google Patents [BibTex]


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Quantifying Therapist Practitioner Roles Using Video-based Analysis: Can We Reliably Model Therapist-Patient Interactions During Task-Oriented Therapy?

Mendonca, R., Johnson, M. J., Laskin, S., Adair, L., Mohan, M.

pages: E55-E56, Abstract in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, October 2016 (misc)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Numerical Investigation of Frictional Forces Between a Finger and a Textured Surface During Active Touch

Khojasteh, B., Janko, M., Visell, Y.

Extended abstract presented in form of an oral presentation at the 3rd International Conference on BioTribology (ICoBT), London, England, September 2016 (misc)

Abstract
The biomechanics of the human finger pad has been investigated in relation to motor behaviour and sensory function in the upper limb. While the frictional properties of the finger pad are important for grip and grasp function, recent attention has also been given to the roles played by friction when perceiving a surface via sliding contact. Indeed, the mechanics of sliding contact greatly affect stimuli felt by the finger scanning a surface. Past research has shed light on neural mechanisms of haptic texture perception, but the relation with time-resolved frictional contact interactions is unknown. Current biotribological models cannot predict time-resolved frictional forces felt by a finger as it slides on a rough surface. This constitutes a missing link in understanding the mechanical basis of texture perception. To ameliorate this, we developed a two-dimensional finite element numerical simulation of a human finger pad in sliding contact with a textured surface. Our model captures bulk mechanical properties, including hyperelasticity, dissipation, and tissue heterogeneity, and contact dynamics. To validate it, we utilized a database of measurements that we previously captured with a variety of human fingers and surfaces. By designing the simulations to match the measurements, we evaluated the ability of the FEM model to predict time-resolved sliding frictional forces. We varied surface texture wavelength, sliding speed, and normal forces in the experiments. An analysis of the results indicated that both time- and frequency-domain features of forces produced during finger-surface sliding interactions were reproduced, including many of the phenomena that we observed in analyses of real measurements, including quasiperiodicity, harmonic distortion and spectral decay in the frequency domain, and their dependence on kinetics and surface properties. The results shed light on frictional signatures of surface texture during active touch, and may inform understanding of the role played by friction in texture discrimination.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Behavioral Learning and Imitation for Music-Based Robotic Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Behavioral Learning and Imitation for Music-Based Robotic Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Burns, R., Nizambad, S., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

Workshop paper (5 pages) at the RO-MAN Workshop on Behavior Adaptation, Interaction and Learning for Assistive Robotics, August 2016 (misc)

Abstract
In this full workshop paper, we discuss the positive impacts of robot, music, and imitation therapies on children with autism. We also discuss the use of Laban Motion Analysis (LMA) to identify emotion through movement and posture cues. We present our preliminary studies of the "Five Senses" game that our two robots, Romo the penguin and Darwin Mini, partake in. Using an LMA-focused approach (enabled by our skeletal tracking Kinect algorithm), we find that our participants show increased frequency of movement and speed when the game has a musical accompaniment. Therefore, participants may have increased engagement with our robots and game if music is present. We also begin exploring motion learning for future works.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Non-parametric Models for Structured Data and Applications to Human Bodies and Natural Scenes
Non-parametric Models for Structured Data and Applications to Human Bodies and Natural Scenes

Lehrmann, A.

ETH Zurich, July 2016 (phdthesis)

Abstract
The purpose of this thesis is the study of non-parametric models for structured data and their fields of application in computer vision. We aim at the development of context-sensitive architectures which are both expressive and efficient. Our focus is on directed graphical models, in particular Bayesian networks, where we combine the flexibility of non-parametric local distributions with the efficiency of a global topology with bounded treewidth. A bound on the treewidth is obtained by either constraining the maximum indegree of the underlying graph structure or by introducing determinism. The non-parametric distributions in the nodes of the graph are given by decision trees or kernel density estimators. The information flow implied by specific network topologies, especially the resultant (conditional) independencies, allows for a natural integration and control of contextual information. We distinguish between three different types of context: static, dynamic, and semantic. In four different approaches we propose models which exhibit varying combinations of these contextual properties and allow modeling of structured data in space, time, and hierarchies derived thereof. The generative character of the presented models enables a direct synthesis of plausible hypotheses. Extensive experiments validate the developed models in two application scenarios which are of particular interest in computer vision: human bodies and natural scenes. In the practical sections of this work we discuss both areas from different angles and show applications of our models to human pose, motion, and segmentation as well as object categorization and localization. Here, we benefit from the availability of modern datasets of unprecedented size and diversity. Comparisons to traditional approaches and state-of-the-art research on the basis of well-established evaluation criteria allows the objective assessment of our contributions.

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pdf [BibTex]


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Design and evaluation of a novel mechanical device to improve hemiparetic gait: a case report

Fjeld, K., Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Vasudevan, E. V.

Extended abstract presented at the Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement Conference (BANCOM), 2016, Poster presentation given by Fjeld (misc)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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One Sensor, Three Displays: A Comparison of Tactile Rendering from a BioTac Sensor

Brown, J. D., Ibrahim, M., Chase, E. D. Z., Pacchierotti, C., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, April 2016 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Multisensory robotic therapy to promote natural emotional interaction for children with ASD
Multisensory robotic therapy to promote natural emotional interaction for children with ASD

Bevill, R., Azzi, P., Spadafora, M., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Kim, H. J., Lee, J., Raihan, K., Howard, A.

Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction (HRI), pages: 571, March 2016 (misc)

Abstract
In this video submission, we are introduced to two robots, Romo the penguin and Darwin Mini. We have programmed these robots to perform a variety of emotions through facial expression and body language, respectively. We aim to use these robots with children with autism, to demo safe emotional and social responses in various sensory situations.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Interactive Robotic Framework for Multi-Sensory Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Interactive Robotic Framework for Multi-Sensory Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Bevill, R., Park, C. H., Kim, H. J., Lee, J., Rennie, A., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

Extended abstract presented at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction (HRI), March 2016 (misc)

Abstract
In this abstract, we present the overarching goal of our interactive robotic framework - to teach emotional and social behavior to children with autism spectrum disorders via multi-sensory therapy. We introduce our robot characters, Romo and Darwin Mini, and the "Five Senses" scenario they will undergo. This sensory game will develop the children's interest, and will model safe and appropriate reactions to typical sensory overload stimuli.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Special Issue on Causal Discovery and Inference

Zhang, K., Li, J., Bareinboim, E., Schölkopf, B., Pearl, J.

ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology (TIST), 7(2), January 2016, (Guest Editors) (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Empirical Inference (2010-2015)
Scientific Advisory Board Report, 2016 (misc)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Domain Adaptation in the Wild : Dealing with Asymmetric Label Set

Mittal, A., Raj, A., Namboodiri, V. P., Tuytelaars, T.

2016 (misc)

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Arxiv [BibTex]

Arxiv [BibTex]


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Designing Human-Robot Exercise Games for Baxter

Fitter, N. T., Hawkes, D. T., Johnson, M. J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

2016, Late-breaking results report presented at the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) (misc)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Design of a Low-Cost Platform for Autonomous Mobile Service Robots

Eaton, E., Mucchiani, C., Mohan, M., Isele, D., Luná, J. M., Clingerman, C.

Workshop paper (7 pages) presented at the 25th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI) Workshop on Autonomous Mobile Service Robots, New York, USA, 2016 (misc)

Abstract
Most current autonomous mobile service robots are either expensive commercial platforms or custom manufactured for research environments, limiting their availability. We present the design for a lowcost service robot based on the widely used TurtleBot 2 platform, with the goal of making service robots affordable and accessible to the research, educational, and hobbyist communities. Our design uses a set of simple and inexpensive modifications to transform the TurtleBot 2 into a 4.5ft (1.37m) tall tour-guide or telepresence-style robot, capable of performing a wide variety of indoor service tasks. The resulting platform provides a shoulder-height touchscreen and 3D camera for interaction, an optional low-cost arm for manipulation, enhanced onboard computation, autonomous charging, and up to 6 hours of runtime. The resulting platform can support many of the tasks performed by significantly more expensive service robots. For compatibility with existing software packages, the service robot runs the Robot Operating System (ROS).

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Perceiving Systems (2011-2015)
Perceiving Systems (2011-2015)
Scientific Advisory Board Report, 2016 (misc)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Extrapolation and learning equations

Martius, G., Lampert, C. H.

2016, arXiv preprint \url{https://arxiv.org/abs/1610.02995} (misc)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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IMU-Mediated Real-Time Human-Baxter Hand-Clapping Interaction

Fitter, N. T., Huang, Y. E., Mayer, J. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

2016, Late-breaking results report presented at the {\em IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems} (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2011


Multi-Modal Scene Understanding for Robotic Grasping
Multi-Modal Scene Understanding for Robotic Grasping

Bohg, J.

(2011:17):vi, 194, Trita-CSC-A, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS, KTH, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS, December 2011 (phdthesis)

Abstract
Current robotics research is largely driven by the vision of creating an intelligent being that can perform dangerous, difficult or unpopular tasks. These can for example be exploring the surface of planet mars or the bottom of the ocean, maintaining a furnace or assembling a car. They can also be more mundane such as cleaning an apartment or fetching groceries. This vision has been pursued since the 1960s when the first robots were built. Some of the tasks mentioned above, especially those in industrial manufacturing, are already frequently performed by robots. Others are still completely out of reach. Especially, household robots are far away from being deployable as general purpose devices. Although advancements have been made in this research area, robots are not yet able to perform household chores robustly in unstructured and open-ended environments given unexpected events and uncertainty in perception and execution.In this thesis, we are analyzing which perceptual and motor capabilities are necessary for the robot to perform common tasks in a household scenario. In that context, an essential capability is to understand the scene that the robot has to interact with. This involves separating objects from the background but also from each other.Once this is achieved, many other tasks become much easier. Configuration of object scan be determined; they can be identified or categorized; their pose can be estimated; free and occupied space in the environment can be outlined.This kind of scene model can then inform grasp planning algorithms to finally pick up objects.However, scene understanding is not a trivial problem and even state-of-the-art methods may fail. Given an incomplete, noisy and potentially erroneously segmented scene model, the questions remain how suitable grasps can be planned and how they can be executed robustly.In this thesis, we propose to equip the robot with a set of prediction mechanisms that allow it to hypothesize about parts of the scene it has not yet observed. Additionally, the robot can also quantify how uncertain it is about this prediction allowing it to plan actions for exploring the scene at specifically uncertain places. We consider multiple modalities including monocular and stereo vision, haptic sensing and information obtained through a human-robot dialog system. We also study several scene representations of different complexity and their applicability to a grasping scenario. Given an improved scene model from this multi-modal exploration, grasps can be inferred for each object hypothesis. Dependent on whether the objects are known, familiar or unknown, different methodologies for grasp inference apply. In this thesis, we propose novel methods for each of these cases. Furthermore,we demonstrate the execution of these grasp both in a closed and open-loop manner showing the effectiveness of the proposed methods in real-world scenarios.

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pdf [BibTex]

2011


pdf [BibTex]


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Please \soutdo not touch the robot

Romano, J. M., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE/RSJ Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), San Francisco, California, sep 2011 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Body-Grounded Tactile Actuators for Playback of Human Physical Contact

Stanley, A. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE World Haptics Conference, Istanbul, Turkey, June 2011 (misc)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Crowdsourcing for optimisation of deconvolution methods via an iPhone application

Lang, A.

Hochschule Reutlingen, Germany, April 2011 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning functions with kernel methods

Dinuzzo, F.

University of Pavia, Italy, January 2011 (phdthesis)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Model Learning in Robot Control

Nguyen-Tuong, D.

Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany, 2011 (phdthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Iterative path integral stochastic optimal control: Theory and applications to motor control

Theodorou, E. A.

University of Southern California, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2011 (phdthesis)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Learning of grasp selection based on shape-templates

Herzog, A.

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 2011 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Spatial Models of Human Motion
Spatial Models of Human Motion

Soren Hauberg

University of Copenhagen, 2011 (phdthesis)

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]

1996


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Evaluation of Gaussian Processes and other Methods for Non-Linear Regression

Rasmussen, CE.

Biologische Kybernetik, Graduate Department of Computer Science, Univeristy of Toronto, 1996 (phdthesis)

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PostScript [BibTex]

1996


PostScript [BibTex]