Header logo is


2020


no image
Vision-based Force Estimation for a da Vinci Instrument Using Deep Neural Networks

Lee, Y., Husin, H. M., Forte, M. P., Lee, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Extended abstract presented as an Emerging Technology ePoster at the Annual Meeting of the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES), Cleveland, Ohio, USA, April 2020 (misc) Accepted

hi

[BibTex]

2020


[BibTex]


Do touch gestures affect how electrovibration feels?
Do touch gestures affect how electrovibration feels?

Vardar, Y., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration (1 page) presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, March 2020 (misc) Accepted

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Learning to Predict Perceptual Distributions of Haptic Adjectives
Learning to Predict Perceptual Distributions of Haptic Adjectives

Richardson, B. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Frontiers in Neurorobotics, 13(116):1-16, Febuary 2020 (article)

Abstract
When humans touch an object with their fingertips, they can immediately describe its tactile properties using haptic adjectives, such as hardness and roughness; however, human perception is subjective and noisy, with significant variation across individuals and interactions. Recent research has worked to provide robots with similar haptic intelligence but was focused on identifying binary haptic adjectives, ignoring both attribute intensity and perceptual variability. Combining ordinal haptic adjective labels gathered from human subjects for a set of 60 objects with features automatically extracted from raw multi-modal tactile data collected by a robot repeatedly touching the same objects, we designed a machine-learning method that incorporates partial knowledge of the distribution of object labels into training; then, from a single interaction, it predicts a probability distribution over the set of ordinal labels. In addition to analyzing the collected labels (10 basic haptic adjectives) and demonstrating the quality of our method's predictions, we hold out specific features to determine the influence of individual sensor modalities on the predictive performance for each adjective. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of modeling both the intensity and the variation of haptic perception, two crucial yet previously neglected components of human haptic perception.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Exercising with Baxter: preliminary support for assistive social-physical human-robot interaction

Fitter, N. T., Mohan, M., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Johnson, M. J.

Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 17(19), Febuary 2020 (article)

Abstract
Background: The worldwide population of older adults will soon exceed the capacity of assisted living facilities. Accordingly, we aim to understand whether appropriately designed robots could help older adults stay active at home. Methods: Building on related literature as well as guidance from experts in game design, rehabilitation, and physical and occupational therapy, we developed eight human-robot exercise games for the Baxter Research Robot, six of which involve physical human-robot contact. After extensive iteration, these games were tested in an exploratory user study including 20 younger adult and 20 older adult users. Results: Only socially and physically interactive games fell in the highest ranges for pleasantness, enjoyment, engagement, cognitive challenge, and energy level. Our games successfully spanned three different physical, cognitive, and temporal challenge levels. User trust and confidence in Baxter increased significantly between pre- and post-study assessments. Older adults experienced higher exercise, energy, and engagement levels than younger adults, and women rated the robot more highly than men on several survey questions. Conclusions: The results indicate that social-physical exercise with a robot is more pleasant, enjoyable, engaging, cognitively challenging, and energetic than similar interactions that lack physical touch. In addition to this main finding, researchers working in similar areas can build on our design practices, our open-source resources, and the age-group and gender differences that we found.

hi

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2008


no image
Active tails enhance arboreal acrobatics in geckos

Jusufi, A., Goldman, D., Revzen, S., Full, R.

PNAS, 105(11):4215-4219, 2008 (article)

bio

link (url) [BibTex]

2008


link (url) [BibTex]


Voltage-Controllable Magnetic Composite Based on Multifunctional Polyethylene Microparticles
Voltage-Controllable Magnetic Composite Based on Multifunctional Polyethylene Microparticles

Ghosh, A., Sheridon, N. K., Fischer, P.

SMALL, 4(11):1956-1958, 2008 (article)

pf

DOI [BibTex]

2002


Chirality-specific nonlinear spectroscopies in isotropic media
Chirality-specific nonlinear spectroscopies in isotropic media

Fischer, P., Albrecht, A.

BULLETIN OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN, 75(5):1119-1124, 2002, 10th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS 2001), OKAZZAKI, JAPAN, MAY 21-25, 2001 (article)

Abstract
Sum or difference frequency generation (SFG or DFG) in isotropic media is in the electric-dipole approximation only symmetry allowed for optically active systems. The hyperpolarizability giving rise to these three-wave mixing processes features only one isotropic component. It factorizes into two terms, an energy (denominator) factor and a triple product of transition moments. These forbid degenerate SFG, i.e., second harmonic generation, as well as the existence of the linear electrooptic effect (Pockels effect) in isotropic media. This second order response also has no static limit, which leads to particularly strong resonance phenomena that are qualitatively different from those usually seen in the ubiquitous even-wave mixing spectroscopies. In particular, the participation of two (not the usual one) excited states is essential to achieve dramatic resonance enhancement, We report our first efforts to see such resonantly enhanced chirality specific SFG.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

2002


DOI [BibTex]


The chiral specificity of sum-frequency generation in solutions
The chiral specificity of sum-frequency generation in solutions

Fischer, P., Beckwitt, K., Wise, F., Albrecht, A.

CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS, 352(5-6):463-468, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Sum-frequency generation in isotropic media is in the electric-dipole approximation the only symmetry allowed for chiral systems. We demonstrate that the sum-frequency intensity from an optically active liquid depends quadratically on the difference in concentration of the two enantiomers. The dominant contribution to the signal is found to be due to the chirality specific electric-dipolar three-wave mixing nonlinearity. Selecting the polarization of all fields allows the chiral electric-dipolar contributions to the bulk sum-frequency signal to be discerned from any achiral magnetic-dipolar and electric-quadrupolar contributions. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


On optical rectification in isotropic media
On optical rectification in isotropic media

Fischer, P., Albrecht, A.

LASER PHYSICS, 12(8):1177-1181, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Coherent nonlinear optical processes at second-order are only electric-dipole allowed in isotropic media that are optically active. Sum-frequency generation in chiral liquids has recently been observed, and difference-frequency and optical rectification have been predicted to exist in isotropic chiral media. Both Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory and the density matrix approach are used to discuss the quantum-chemical basis of optical rectification in optically active liquids. For pinene we compute the corresponding orientationally averaged hyperpolarizability, and estimate the light-induced dc electric polarization and the consequent voltage across a measuring capacitor it may give rise to near resonance.

pf

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2001


Isotropic second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities
Isotropic second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities

Fischer, P., Buckingham, A., Albrecht, A.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 64(5), 2001 (article)

Abstract
The second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, in the electric dipole approximation, is only nonvanishing for materials that are noncentrosymmetric. Should the medium be isotropic, then only a chiral system. such as an optically active liquid, satisfies this symmetry requirement. We derive the quantum-mechanical form of the isotropic component of the sum- and difference-frequency susceptibility and discuss its unusual spectral properties. We show that any coherent second-order nonlinear optical process in a system of randomly oriented molecules requires the medium to be chiral. and the incident frequencies to be different and nonzero. Furthermore, a minimum of two nondegenerate excited molecular states are needed for the isotropic part of the susceptibility to be nonvanishing. The rotationally invariant susceptibility is zero in the static field limit and shows exceptionally sensitive resonance and dephasing effects that are particular to chiral centers.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

2001


DOI [BibTex]


Reply to ``Comment on `Phenomenological damping in optical response tensors'{''}
Reply to “Comment on ‘Phenomenological damping in optical response tensors’”

Buckingham, A., Fischer, P.

PHYSICAL REVIEW A, 63(4), 2001 (article)

Abstract
We show that damping factors must not be incorporated in the perturbation of the ground state by a static electric field. If they are included, as in the theory of Stedman et al. {[}preceding Comment. Phys. Rev. A 63, 047801 (2001)], then there would be an electric dipole in the y direction induced in a hydrogen atom in the M-s = + 1/2 state by a static electric field in the x direction. Such a dipole is excluded by symmetry.

pf

DOI [BibTex]