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2009


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Full phase and amplitude control in computer-generated holography

Fratz, M., Fischer, P., Giel, D. M.

OPTICS LETTERS, 34(23):3659-3661, 2009 (article)

Abstract
We report what we believe to be the first realization of a computer-generated complex-valued hologram recorded in a single film of photoactive polymer. Complex-valued holograms give rise to a diffracted optical field with control over its amplitude and phase. The holograms are generated by a one-step direct laser writing process in which a spatial light modulator (SLM) is imaged onto a polymer film. Temporal modulation of the SLM during exposure controls both the strength of the induced birefringence and the orientation of the fast axis. We demonstrate that complex holograms can be used to impart arbitrary amplitude and phase profiles onto a beam and thereby open new possibilities in the control of optical beams. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America

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[BibTex]

2009


[BibTex]


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Digital polarization holograms with defined magnitude and orientation of each pixel’s birefringence

Fratz, M., Giel, D. M., Fischer, P.

OPTICS LETTERS, 34(8):1270-1272, 2009 (article)

Abstract
A new form of digital polarization holography is demonstrated that permits both the amplitude and the phase of a diffracted beam to be independently controlled. This permits two independent intensity images to be stored in the same hologram. To fabricate the holograms, a birefringence with defined retardance and orientation of the fast axis is recorded into a photopolymer film. The holograms are selectively read out by choosing the polarization state of the read beam. Polarization holograms of this kind increase the data density in holographic data storage and allow higher quality diffractive optical elements to be written. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America

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[BibTex]


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Controlled Propulsion of Artificial Magnetic Nanostructured Propellers

Ghosh, A., Fischer, P.

NANO LETTERS, 9(6):2243-2245, 2009, Featured highlight ‘Nanotechnology: The helix that delivers’ Nature 459, 13 (2009). (article)

Abstract
For biomedical applications, such as targeted drug delivery and microsurgery, it is essential to develop a system of swimmers that can be propelled wirelessly in fluidic environments with good control. Here, we report the construction and operation of chiral colloidal propellers that can be navigated in water with micrometer-level precision using homogeneous magnetic fields. The propellers are made via nanostructured surfaces and can be produced in large numbers. The nanopropellers can carry chemicals, push loads, and act as local probes in rheological measurements.

Featured highlight ‘Nanotechnology: The helix that delivers’ Nature 459, 13 (2009).

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Video - Nanospropellers DOI [BibTex]

Video - Nanospropellers DOI [BibTex]


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Absolute Asymmetric Reduction Based on the Relative Orientation of Achiral Reactants

Kuhn, A., Fischer, P.

ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION, 48(37):6857-6860, 2009 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Sensor-Based Learning Algorithm for the Self-Organization of Robot Behavior

Hesse, F., Martius, G., Der, R., Herrmann, J. M.

Algorithms, 2(1):398-409, 2009 (article)

Abstract
Ideally, sensory information forms the only source of information to a robot. We consider an algorithm for the self-organization of a controller. At short timescales the controller is merely reactive but the parameter dynamics and the acquisition of knowledge by an internal model lead to seemingly purposeful behavior on longer timescales. As a paradigmatic example, we study the simulation of an underactuated snake-like robot. By interacting with the real physical system formed by the robotic hardware and the environment, the controller achieves a sensitive and body-specific actuation of the robot.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

2006


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Let It Roll – Emerging Sensorimotor Coordination in a Spherical Robot

Der, R., Martius, G., Hesse, F.

In Proc, Artificial Life X, pages: 192-198, Intl. Society for Artificial Life, MIT Press, August 2006 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

2006


[BibTex]


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Chiral molecules split light: Reflection and refraction in a chiral liquid

Ghosh, A., Fischer, P.

PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, 97(17), 2006, Featured highlight ‘Fundamental optical physics: Refraction’ Nature Photonics, Nov. 2006. (article)

Abstract
A light beam changes direction as it enters a liquid at an angle from another medium, such as air. Should the liquid contain molecules that lack mirror symmetry, then it has been predicted by Fresnel that the light beam will not only change direction, but will actually split into two separate beams with a small difference in the respective angles of refraction. Here we report the observation of this phenomenon. We also demonstrate that the angle of reflection does not equal the angle of incidence in a chiral medium. Unlike conventional optical rotation, which depends on the path-length through the sample, the reported reflection and refraction phenomena arise within a few wavelengths at the interface and thereby suggest a new approach to polarimetry that can be used in microfluidic volumes.

Featured highlight ‘Fundamental optical physics: Refraction’ Nature Photonics, Nov. 2006.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Direct chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy

Buckingham, A., Fischer, P.

CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 324(1):111-116, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is unable to distinguish between the two mirror-image forms (enantiomers) of a chiral molecule. This is because the NMR spectrum is determined by the chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants which - in the absence of a chiral solvent - are identical for the two enantiomers. We discuss how chirality may nevertheless be directly detected in liquid-state NMR spectroscopy: In a chiral molecule, the rotating nuclear magnetic moment induces an electric dipole moment in the direction perpendicular to itself and to the permanent magnetic field of the spectrometer. We present computations of the precessing electric polarization following a pi/2 pulse. Our estimates indicate that the electric polarization should be detectable in favourable cases. We also predict that application of an electrostatic field induces a chirally sensitive magnetization oscillating in the direction of the permanent magnetic field. We show that the electric-field-perturbed chemical shift tensor, the nuclear magnetic shielding polarizability, underlies these chiral NMR effects. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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NONLINEAR OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF CHIRAL LIQUIDS Electric-dipolar pseudoscalars in nonlinear optics

Fischer, P., Champagne, B.

In NON-LINEAR OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER: FROM MOLECULES TO CONDENSED PHASES, 1, pages: 359-381, Challenges and Advances in Computational Chemistry and Physics, 2006 (incollection)

Abstract
We give all overview of linear and nonlinear optical processes that can be specific to chiral molecules in isotropic media. Specifically, we discuss the pseudoscalars that underlie nonlinear optical activity and chiral frequency conversion processes in fluids. We show that nonlinear optical techniques open entirely new ways of exploring chirality: Sum-frequency-generation (SFG) at second-order and BioCARS at fourth-order arise in the electric-dipole approximation and do not require circularly polarized light to detect chiral molecules in solution. Here the frequency conversion in itself is a measure of chirality. This is in contrast to natural optical activity phenomena which are based on the interference of radiation from induced oscillating electric and magnetic dipoles, and which are observed as a differential response to right and left circularly polarized light. We give examples from our SFG experiments in optically active solutions and show how the application of an additional static electric field to sum-frequency generation allows the absolute configuration of the chiral solute to be determined via all electric-dipolar process. Results from ab initio calculations of the SFG pseudoscalar are presented for a number of chiral molecules

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Ring-resonator-based frequency-domain optical activity measurements of a chiral liquid

Vollmer, F., Fischer, P.

OPTICS LETTERS, 31(4):453-455, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Chiral liquids rotate the plane of polarization of linearly polarized light and are therefore optically active. Here we show that optical rotation can be observed in the frequency domain. A chiral liquid introduced in a fiber-loop ring resonator that supports left and right circularly polarized modes gives rise to relative frequency shifts that are a direct measure of the liquid's circular birefringence and hence of its optical activity. The effect is in principle not diminished if the circumference of the ring is reduced. The technique is similarly applicable to refractive index and linear birefringence measurements. (c) 2006 Optical Society of America.

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DOI [BibTex]


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Sign of the refractive index in a gain medium with negative permittivity and permeability

Chen, Y., Fischer, P., Wise, F.

JOURNAL OF THE OPTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA B-OPTICAL PHYSICS, 23(1):45-50, 2006 (article)

Abstract
We show how the sign of the refractive index in any medium may be derived using a rigorous analysis based on Einstein causality. In particular, we consider left-handed materials, i.e., media that have negative permittivities and permeabilities at the frequency of interest. We find that the consideration of gain in such media can give rise to a positive refractive index. (c) 2006 Optical Society of America.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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From Motor Babbling to Purposive Actions: Emerging Self-exploration in a Dynamical Systems Approach to Early Robot Development

Der, R., Martius, G.

In Proc. From Animals to Animats 9, SAB 2006, 4095, pages: 406-421, LNCS, Springer, 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Self-organization and the phenomenon of emergence play an essential role in living systems and form a challenge to artificial life systems. This is not only because systems become more lifelike, but also since self-organization may help in reducing the design efforts in creating complex behavior systems. The present paper studies self-exploration based on a general approach to the self-organization of behavior, which has been developed and tested in various examples in recent years. This is a step towards autonomous early robot development. We consider agents under the close sensorimotor coupling paradigm with a certain cognitive ability realized by an internal forward model. Starting from tabula rasa initial conditions we overcome the bootstrapping problem and show emerging self-exploration. Apart from that, we analyze the effect of limited actions, which lead to deprivation of the world model. We show that our paradigm explicitly avoids this by producing purposive actions in a natural way. Examples are given using a simulated simple wheeled robot and a spherical robot driven by shifting internal masses.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Rocking Stamper and Jumping Snake from a Dynamical System Approach to Artificial Life

Der, R., Hesse, F., Martius, G.

Adaptive Behavior, 14(2):105-115, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Dynamical systems offer intriguing possibilities as a substrate for the generation of behavior because of their rich behavioral complexity. However this complexity together with the largely covert relation between the parameters and the behavior of the agent is also the main hindrance in the goal-oriented design of a behavior system. This paper presents a general approach to the self-regulation of dynamical systems so that the design problem is circumvented. We consider the controller (a neural net work) as the mediator for changes in the sensor values over time and define a dynamics for the parameters of the controller by maximizing the dynamical complexity of the sensorimotor loop under the condition that the consequences of the actions taken are still predictable. This very general principle is given a concrete mathematical formulation and is implemented in an extremely robust and versatile algorithm for the parameter dynamics of the controller. We consider two different applications, a mechanical device called the rocking stamper and the ODE simulations of a "snake" with five degrees of freedom. In these and many other examples studied we observed various behavior modes of high dynamical complexity.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

1998


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Surface second-order nonlinear optical activity

Fischer, P., Buckingham, A.

JOURNAL OF THE OPTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA B-OPTICAL PHYSICS, 15(12):2951-2957, 1998 (article)

Abstract
Following the recent observation of a large second-harmonic intensity difference from a monolayer of chiral molecules with left and right circularly polarized light, the scattering theory is generalized and extended to predict linear and circular intensity differences for the more Versatile sum-frequency spectroscopy. Estimates indicate that intensity differences should be detectable for a typical experimental arrangement. The second-order nonlinear surface susceptibility tensor is given for different surface point groups in the electric dipole approximation; it is shown that nonlinear optical activity phenomena unambiguously probe molecular chirality only for molecular monolayers that are symmetric about the normal. Other surface symmetries can give rise to intensity differences from monolayers composed of achiral molecules. A water surface is predicted to show Linear and nonlinear optical activity in the presence of an electric field parallel to the surface. (C) 1998 Optical Society of America {[}S0740-3224(98)01311-3] OCIS codes: 190.0190, 190.4350, 240.6490.

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DOI [BibTex]

1998


DOI [BibTex]


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Linear electro-optic effect in optically active liquids

Buckingham, A., Fischer, P.

CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS, 297(3-4):239-246, 1998 (article)

Abstract
A linear effect of an electrostatic field F on the intensity of sum- and difference-frequency generation in a chiral liquid is predicted. It arises in the electric dipole approximation. The effect changes sign with the enantiomer and on reversing the direction of the electrostatic field. The sum-frequency generator chi(alpha beta gamma)((2)) (-omega(3);omega(1),omega(2)), where omega(3) = omega(1) + omega(2), and the electric field-induced sum-frequency generator chi(alpha beta gamma delta)((3))(-omega(3);omega(1),omega(2),0)F-delta interfere and their contributions to the scattering power can be distinguished. Encouraging predictions are given for a typical experimental arrangement. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Monolayers of hexadecyltrimethylammonium p-tosylate at the air-water interface. 1. Sum-frequency spectroscopy

Bell, G., Li, Z., Bain, C., Fischer, P., Duffy, D.

JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 102(47):9461-9472, 1998 (article)

Abstract
Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure of monolayers of the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium p-tosylate (C(16)TA(+)Ts(-)), at the surface of water. Selective deuteration of the cation or the anion allowed the separate detection of sum-frequency spectra of the surfactant and of counterions that are bound to the monolayer. The p-tosylate ions an oriented with their methyl groups pointing away from the aqueous subphase and with the C-2 axis tilted, on average, by 30-40 degrees from the surface normal. The vibrational spectra of C(16)TA(+) indicate that the number of gauche defects in the monolayer does not change dramatically when bromide counterions are replaced by p-tosylate. The ends of the hydrocarbon chains of C16TA+ are, however, tilted much further from the surface normal in the presence of p-tosylate than in the presence of bromide. A quantitative analysis of the sum-frequency spectra requires a knowledge of the molecular hyperpolarizability tensor: the role of ab initio calculations and Raman spectroscopy in determining the components of this tensor is discussed.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ultraviolet resonance Raman study of drug binding in dihydrofolate reductase, gyrase, and catechol O-methyltransferase

Couling, V., Fischer, P., Klenerman, D., Huber, W.

BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 75(2):1097-1106, 1998 (article)

Abstract
This paper presents a study of the use of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic methods as a means of elucidating aspects of drug-protein interactions. Some of the RR vibrational bands of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine and tryptophan are sensitive to the microenvironment, and the use of UV excitation radiation allows selective enhancement of the spectral features of the aromatic amino acids, enabling observation specifically of their change in microenvironment upon drug binding. The three drug-protein systems investigated in this study are dihydrofolate reductase with its inhibitor trimethoprim, gyrase with novobiocin, and catechol O-methyltransferase with dinitrocatechol. It is demonstrated that UVRR spectroscopy has adequate sensitivity to be a useful means of detecting drug-protein interactions in those systems for which the electronic absorption of the aromatic amino acids changes because of hydrogen bonding and/or possible dipole-dipole and dipole-polarizability interactions with the ligand.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]