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Institute News

Open Day - Tag der offenen Tür

  • 18 June 2016

Max Planck Campus Tübingen

Einblicke in die Labore, Experimente zum Mitmachen und ein Science Slam: Im Juni gibt es Forschung zum Anfassen

Claudia Daefler


Jonas Peters New Member of the German "Young Academy"

  • 13 June 2016

Young, excellent and motivated - Jonas Peters has been elected as one of ten new members to the "Junge Akademie" and will contribute to the interdisciplinary work of this organization. Congratulations!

Jonas Peters


Faculty position

  • 12 June 2016

Congrats and good luck to Dr. Ji Tae Kim who has started as Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Hong Kong (June 2016).

JiKae Kim


Finalist for WODES 2016 Best Student Paper

  • 01 June 2016

Simon Ebner´s paper on the results of his master thesis

Topic: "Communication rate analysis for event-based state estimation"

Simon Ebner


A special kind of robot workshop (a nice story from last year)

  • 30 May 2016

A Nao flies East and helps Laura Sevilla to teach technology knowledge to children from the Philippines

Fascinated Kids with excited faces and curious voices, expressing happiness and thankfulness...- these emotions were raised by a little NAO robot that was the main actor of a robot workshop that took place in May 2015 in the Philippines. Laura Sevilla, a PostDoc at the MPI for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, took two months off and volunteered more than five weeks in order to organize and lead this workshop.

Laura Sevilla


Switch and stick

  • 18 May 2016

The chemical element gallium could be used as a new reversible adhesive that allows its adhesive effect to be switched on and off with ease

Some adhesives may soon have a metallic sheen and be particularly easy to unstick. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart are suggesting gallium as just such a reversible adhesive. By inducing slight changes in temperature, they can control whether a layer of gallium sticks or not. This is based on the fact that gallium transitions from a solid state to a liquid state at around 30 degrees Celsius. A reversible adhesive of this kind could have applications everywhere that temporary adhesion is required, such as industrial pick-and-place processes, transfer printing, temporary wafer bonding, or for moving sensitive biological samples such as tissues and organs. Switchable adhesion could also be suitable for use on the feet of climbing robots.

Metin Sitti Zhou Ye Guo Zhan Lum Sukho Song


Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-Prize 2016 for Ludovic Righetti

  • 18 May 2016

Medal-Marathon for Robotics Researcher

Tübingen – Stockholm – Berlin – Stockholm – Tübingen; Ludovic Righetti receives within 24 hours two renowned prizes for young researchers for his outstanding science on movements of robots

Ludovic Righetti


Michael J. Black Inducted as Foreign Member of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

  • 13 May 2016

Dr. Black recognized for his leadership in advancing body modeling and computer vision sciences

Body Labs (bodylabs.com), the provider of the world's most advanced technology for analyzing the human body's shape, pose and motion, announced today that Michael J. Black, Body Labs co-founder and board member, will be inducted as a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

Michael Black


Tiny microbots that can clean up water

  • 29 April 2016

Max Planck researchers have developed self-propelled tiny ‘microbots’ that can remove lead or organic pollutions from contaminated water.

Working with colleagues in Barcelona and Singapore, Samuel Sanchez’s group used graphene oxide to make their microscale motors, which are able to adsorb lead from industrial wastewater from a level of 1000 parts-per-billion to down to below 50 parts-per-billion in just an hour. The lead can later be removed for recycling, and the micromotors can be used over and over again.

Sámuel Sánchez


Flow at the nanoscale: what stops a drop and keeps nanobubbles alive

  • 12 April 2016

Max Planck researchers from Stuttgart present first model calculation

All of us have seen it: a raindrop running down the windowpane. It stops at a certain point, is met by a second raindrop and the two join up before continuing to run down the pane. Very small irregularities or dirt on the windowpane appear to stop the course of the raindrops. If the surface was entirely smooth and chemically clean, the raindrops would be able to flow unhindered. Surface defects such as small bumps and dimples as well as chemical contaminants stop the liquid drops. These are everyday phenomena everyone knows and can observe with the naked eye.

Siegfried Dietrich