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2012


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Gecko-Inspired Controllable Adhesive Structures Applied to Micromanipulation

Mengüç, Y., Yang, S. Y., Kim, S., Rogers, J. A., Sitti, M.

Advanced Functional Materials, 22(6):1245-1245, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2012 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

2012


Project Page [BibTex]


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Elastomer surfaces with directionally dependent adhesion strength and their use in transfer printing with continuous roll-to-roll applications

Yang, S. Y., Carlson, A., Cheng, H., Yu, Q., Ahmed, N., Wu, J., Kim, S., Sitti, M., Ferreira, P. M., Huang, Y., others,

Advanced Materials, 24(16):2117-2122, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2012 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Effect of retraction speed on adhesion of elastomer fibrillar structures

Abusomwan, U., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 101(21):211907, AIP, 2012 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Die Stabilität des stromtragenden Zustands in MgB2 Schichten mit modifizierter Mikrostruktur

Treiber, S.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Accelerated diffusion and phase transformations in Co-Cu alloys driven by the severe plastic deformation

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Baretzky, B., Schütz, G., Rabkin, E., Valiev, R. Z.

{Special Issue on Advanced Materials Science in Bulk Nanostructured Metals}, 53(1):63-71, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Unusual flux jumps above 12 K in non-homogeneous MgB2 thin films

Treiber, S., Stahl, C., Schütz, G., Albrecht, J.

{Superconductor Science \& Technology}, 25, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ferromagnetism of nanostructured zinc oxide films

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Straumal, P. B., Myatiev, A. A., Schütz, G., Goering, E., Baretzky, B.

{The Physics of Metals and Metallography}, 113(13):1244-1256, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Frequencies and polarization vectors of phonons: Results from force constants which are fitted to experimental data or calculated ab initio

Illg, C., Meyer, B., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 86(17), Published by the American Physical Society through the American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, NY, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Grain boundary wetting by a second solid phase in the Zr-Nb alloys

Straumal, B. B., Gornakova, A. S., Kucheev, Y. O., Baretzky, B., Nekrasov, A. N.

{Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance}, 21(5):721-724, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Grain boundary wetting in the NdFeB-based hard magnetic alloys

Straumal, B. B., Kucheev, Y. O., Yatskovskaya, I. L., Mogilnikova, I. V., Schütz, G., Nekrasov, A. N., Baretzky, B.

{Journal of Materials Science}, 47(24):8352-8359, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Layered segmentation and optical flow estimation over time

Sun, D., Sudderth, E., Black, M. J.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pages: 1768-1775, IEEE, 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Layered models provide a compelling approach for estimating image motion and segmenting moving scenes. Previous methods, however, have failed to capture the structure of complex scenes, provide precise object boundaries, effectively estimate the number of layers in a scene, or robustly determine the depth order of the layers. Furthermore, previous methods have focused on optical flow between pairs of frames rather than longer sequences. We show that image sequences with more frames are needed to resolve ambiguities in depth ordering at occlusion boundaries; temporal layer constancy makes this feasible. Our generative model of image sequences is rich but difficult to optimize with traditional gradient descent methods. We propose a novel discrete approximation of the continuous objective in terms of a sequence of depth-ordered MRFs and extend graph-cut optimization methods with new “moves” that make joint layer segmentation and motion estimation feasible. Our optimizer, which mixes discrete and continuous optimization, automatically determines the number of layers and reasons about their depth ordering. We demonstrate the value of layered models, our optimization strategy, and the use of more than two frames on both the Middlebury optical flow benchmark and the MIT layer segmentation benchmark.

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pdf sup mat poster Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

pdf sup mat poster Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Towards Associative Skill Memories

Pastor, P., Kalakrishnan, M., Righetti, L., Schaal, S.

In 2012 12th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2012), pages: 309-315, IEEE, Osaka, Japan, November 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Movement primitives as basis of movement planning and control have become a popular topic in recent years. The key idea of movement primitives is that a rather small set of stereotypical movements should suffice to create a large set of complex manipulation skills. An interesting side effect of stereotypical movement is that it also creates stereotypical sensory events, e.g., in terms of kinesthetic variables, haptic variables, or, if processed appropriately, visual variables. Thus, a movement primitive executed towards a particular object in the environment will associate a large number of sensory variables that are typical for this manipulation skill. These association can be used to increase robustness towards perturbations, and they also allow failure detection and switching towards other behaviors. We call such movement primitives augmented with sensory associations Associative Skill Memories (ASM). This paper addresses how ASMs can be acquired by imitation learning and how they can create robust manipulation skill by determining subsequent ASMs online to achieve a particular manipulation goal. Evaluation for grasping and manipulation with a Barrett WAM/Hand illustrate our approach.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Template-based learning of grasp selection

Herzog, A., Pastor, P., Kalakrishnan, M., Righetti, L., Asfour, T., Schaal, S.

In 2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 2379-2384, IEEE, Saint Paul, USA, 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The ability to grasp unknown objects is an important skill for personal robots, which has been addressed by many present and past research projects, but still remains an open problem. A crucial aspect of grasping is choosing an appropriate grasp configuration, i.e. the 6d pose of the hand relative to the object and its finger configuration. Finding feasible grasp configurations for novel objects, however, is challenging because of the huge variety in shape and size of these objects. Moreover, possible configurations also depend on the specific kinematics of the robotic arm and hand in use. In this paper, we introduce a new grasp selection algorithm able to find object grasp poses based on previously demonstrated grasps. Assuming that objects with similar shapes can be grasped in a similar way, we associate to each demonstrated grasp a grasp template. The template is a local shape descriptor for a possible grasp pose and is constructed using 3d information from depth sensors. For each new object to grasp, the algorithm then finds the best grasp candidate in the library of templates. The grasp selection is also able to improve over time using the information of previous grasp attempts to adapt the ranking of the templates. We tested the algorithm on two different platforms, the Willow Garage PR2 and the Barrett WAM arm which have very different hands. Our results show that the algorithm is able to find good grasp configurations for a large set of objects from a relatively small set of demonstrations, and does indeed improve its performance over time.

am mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning with Sequences of Motion Primitives for Robust Manipulation

Stulp, F., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 2012 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Impact and Surface Tension in Water: a Study of Landing Bodies

Shih, B., Laham, L., Lee, K. J., Krasnoff, N., Diller, E., Sitti, M.

Bio-inspired Robotics Final Project, Carnegie Mellon University, 2012 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design and rolling locomotion of a magnetically actuated soft capsule endoscope

Yim, S., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 28(1):183-194, IEEE, 2012 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Design and manufacturing of a controllable miniature flapping wing robotic platform

Arabagi, V., Hines, L., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 31(6):785-800, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2012 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Chemotactic steering of bacteria propelled microbeads

Kim, D., Liu, A., Diller, E., Sitti, M.

Biomedical microdevices, 14(6):1009-1017, Springer US, 2012 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Probabilistic depth image registration incorporating nonvisual information

Wüthrich, M., Pastor, P., Righetti, L., Billard, A., Schaal, S.

In 2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 3637-3644, IEEE, Saint Paul, USA, 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we derive a probabilistic registration algorithm for object modeling and tracking. In many robotics applications, such as manipulation tasks, nonvisual information about the movement of the object is available, which we will combine with the visual information. Furthermore we do not only consider observations of the object, but we also take space into account which has been observed to not be part of the object. Furthermore we are computing a posterior distribution over the relative alignment and not a point estimate as typically done in for example Iterative Closest Point (ICP). To our knowledge no existing algorithm meets these three conditions and we thus derive a novel registration algorithm in a Bayesian framework. Experimental results suggest that the proposed methods perform favorably in comparison to PCL [1] implementations of feature mapping and ICP, especially if nonvisual information is available.

am mg

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Hartmagnetische L10-FePt basierte gro\ssflächige Nanomuster mittels Nanoimprint-Lithografie

Bublat, T.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2012 (phdthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Magnetic proximity effect in YBa2Cu3O7 / La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 and YBa2Cu3O7 / LaMnO3+δsuperlattices

Satapathy, D. K., Uribe-Laverde, M. A., Marozau, I., Malik, V. K., Das, S., Wagner, T., Marcelot, C., Stahn, J., Brück, S., Rühm, A., Macke, S., Tietze, T., Goering, E., Frañó, A., Kim, J., Wu, M., Benckiser, E., Keimer, B., Devishvili, A., Toperverg, B. P., Merz, M., Nagel, P., Schuppler, S., Bernhard, C.

{Physical Review Letters}, 108, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structural and chemical characterization on the nanoscale

Stierle, A., Carstanjen, H.-D., Hofmann, S.

In Nanoelectronics and Information Technology. Advanced Electronic Materials and Novel Devices, pages: 233-254, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Noble gases and microporous frameworks; from interaction to application

Soleimani Dorcheh, A., Denysenko, D., Volkmer, D., Donner, W., Hirscher, M.

{Microporous and Mesoporous Materials}, 162, pages: 64-68, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Note: Unique characterization possibilities in the ultra high vacuum scanning transmission x-ray microscope (UHV-STXM) "MAXYMUS" using a rotatable permanent magnetic field up to 0.22 T

Nolle, D., Weigand, M., Audehm, P., Goering, E., Wiesemann, U., Wolter, C., Nolle, E., Schütz, G.

{Review of Scientific Instruments}, 83(4), 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]


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Rutherford Backscattering

Carstanjen, H. D.

In Nanoelectronics and Information Technology. Advanced Electronic Materials and Novel Devices, pages: 250-252, WILEY-VCH Verlag, Weinheim, Germany, 2012 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microstructure and superconducting properties of MgB2 films prepared by solid state reaction of multilayer precursors of the elements

Kugler, B., Stahl, C., Treiber, S., Soltan, S., Haug, S., Schütz, G., Albrecht, J.

{Thin Solid Films}, 520, pages: 6985-6988, 2012 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Consumer Depth Cameras for Computer Vision - Research Topics and Applications

Fossati, A., Gall, J., Grabner, H., Ren, X., Konolige, K.

Advances in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, Springer, 2012 (book)

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workshop publisher's site [BibTex]

workshop publisher's site [BibTex]


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Spatial Measures between Human Poses for Classification and Understanding

Soren Hauberg, Kim S. Pedersen

In Articulated Motion and Deformable Objects, 7378, pages: 26-36, LNCS, (Editors: Perales, Francisco J. and Fisher, Robert B. and Moeslund, Thomas B.), Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2012 (inproceedings)

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Publishers site Project Page [BibTex]

Publishers site Project Page [BibTex]


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A Geometric Take on Metric Learning

Hauberg, S., Freifeld, O., Black, M. J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) 25, pages: 2033-2041, (Editors: P. Bartlett and F.C.N. Pereira and C.J.C. Burges and L. Bottou and K.Q. Weinberger), MIT Press, 2012 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Multi-metric learning techniques learn local metric tensors in different parts of a feature space. With such an approach, even simple classifiers can be competitive with the state-of-the-art because the distance measure locally adapts to the structure of the data. The learned distance measure is, however, non-metric, which has prevented multi-metric learning from generalizing to tasks such as dimensionality reduction and regression in a principled way. We prove that, with appropriate changes, multi-metric learning corresponds to learning the structure of a Riemannian manifold. We then show that this structure gives us a principled way to perform dimensionality reduction and regression according to the learned metrics. Algorithmically, we provide the first practical algorithm for computing geodesics according to the learned metrics, as well as algorithms for computing exponential and logarithmic maps on the Riemannian manifold. Together, these tools let many Euclidean algorithms take advantage of multi-metric learning. We illustrate the approach on regression and dimensionality reduction tasks that involve predicting measurements of the human body from shape data.

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PDF Youtube Suppl. material Poster Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Youtube Suppl. material Poster Project Page [BibTex]

2011


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Statistical estimation for optimization problems on graphs

Langovoy, M., Sra, S.

In pages: 1-6, NIPS Workshop on Discrete Optimization in Machine Learning (DISCML): Uncertainty, Generalization and Feedback , December 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Large graphs abound in machine learning, data mining, and several related areas. A useful step towards analyzing such graphs is that of obtaining certain summary statistics — e.g., or the expected length of a shortest path between two nodes, or the expected weight of a minimum spanning tree of the graph, etc. These statistics provide insight into the structure of a graph, and they can help predict global properties of a graph. Motivated thus, we propose to study statistical properties of structured subgraphs (of a given graph), in particular, to estimate the expected objective function value of a combinatorial optimization problem over these subgraphs. The general task is very difficult, if not unsolvable; so for concreteness we describe a more specific statistical estimation problem based on spanning trees. We hope that our position paper encourages others to also study other types of graphical structures for which one can prove nontrivial statistical estimates.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

2011


PDF Web [BibTex]


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Projected Newton-type methods in machine learning

Schmidt, M., Kim, D., Sra, S.

In Optimization for Machine Learning, pages: 305-330, (Editors: Sra, S., Nowozin, S. and Wright, S. J.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2011 (inbook)

Abstract
We consider projected Newton-type methods for solving large-scale optimization problems arising in machine learning and related fields. We first introduce an algorithmic framework for projected Newton-type methods by reviewing a canonical projected (quasi-)Newton method. This method, while conceptually pleasing, has a high computation cost per iteration. Thus, we discuss two variants that are more scalable, namely, two-metric projection and inexact projection methods. Finally, we show how to apply the Newton-type framework to handle non-smooth objectives. Examples are provided throughout the chapter to illustrate machine learning applications of our framework.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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On the discardability of data in Support Vector Classification problems

Del Favero, S., Varagnolo, D., Dinuzzo, F., Schenato, L., Pillonetto, G.

In pages: 3210-3215, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 50th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control and European Control Conference (CDC - ECC), December 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We analyze the problem of data sets reduction for support vector classification. The work is also motivated by distributed problems, where sensors collect binary measurements at different locations moving inside an environment that needs to be divided into a collection of regions labeled in two different ways. The scope is to let each agent retain and exchange only those measurements that are mostly informative for the collective reconstruction of the decision boundary. For the case of separable classes, we provide the exact conditions and an efficient algorithm to determine if an element in the training set can become a support vector when new data arrive. The analysis is then extended to the non-separable case deriving a sufficient discardability condition and a general data selection scheme for classification. Numerical experiments relative to the distributed problem show that the proposed procedure allows the agents to exchange a small amount of the collected data to obtain a highly predictive decision boundary.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Combined whole-body PET/MR imaging: MR contrast agents do not affect the quantitative accuracy of PET following attenuation correction

Lois, C., Kupferschläger, J., Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Werner, M., Mannheim, J., Pichler, B., Schwenzer, N., Beyer, T.

(SST15-05 ), 97th Scientific Assemble and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), December 2011 (talk)

Abstract
PURPOSE Combined PET/MR imaging entails the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) as part of integrated protocols. We assess additional attenuation of the PET emission signals in the presence of oral and intraveneous (iv) MRCA made up of iron oxide and Gd-chelates, respectively. METHOD AND MATERIALS Phantom scans were performed on a clinical PET/CT (Biograph HiRez16, Siemens) and integrated whole-body PET/MR (Biograph mMR, Siemens) using oral (Lumirem) and intraveneous (Gadovist) MRCA. Reference PET attenuation values were determined on a small-animal PET (Inveon, Siemens) using standard PET transmission imaging (TX). Seven syringes of 5mL were filled with (a) Water, (b) Lumirem_100 (100% conc.), (c) Gadovist_100 (100%), (d) Gadovist_18 (18%), (e) Gadovist_02 (0.2%), (f) Imeron-400 CT iv-contrast (100%) and (g) Imeron-400 (2.4%). The same set of syringes was scanned on CT (Sensation16, Siemens) at 120kVp and 160mAs. The effect of MRCA on the attenuation of PET emission data was evaluated using a 20cm cylinder filled uniformly with [18F]-FDG (FDG) in water (BGD). Three 4.5cm diameter cylinders were inserted into the phantom: (C1) Teflon, (C2) Water+FDG (2:1) and (C3) Lumirem_100+FDG (2:1). Two 50mL syringes filled with Gadovist_02+FDG (Sy1) and water+FDG (Sy2) were attached to the sides of (C1) to mimick the effects of iv-contrast in vessels near bone. Syringe-to-background activity ratio was 4-to-1. PET emission data were acquired for 10min each using the PET/CT and the PET/MR. Images were reconstructed using CT- and MR-based attenuation correction. RESULTS Mean linear PET attenuation (cm-1) on TX was (a) 0.098, (b) 0.098, (c) 0.300, (d) 0.134, (e) 0.095, (f) 0.397 and (g) 0.105. Corresponding CT attenuation (HU) was: (a) 5, (b) 14, (c) 3070, (d) 1040, (e) 13, (f) 3070 and (g) 347. Lumirem had little effect on PET attenuation with (C3) being 13% and 10% higher than (C2) on PET/CT and PET/MR, respectively. Gadovist_02 had even smaller effects with (Sy1) being 2.5% lower than (Sy2) on PET/CT and 1.2% higher than (Sy2) on PET/MR. CONCLUSION MRCA in high and clinically relevant concentrations have attenuation values similar to that of CT contrast and water, respectively. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to significant attenuation of the PET emission signals.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Causal Inference on Discrete Data using Additive Noise Models

Peters, J., Janzing, D., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 33(12):2436-2450, December 2011 (article)

Abstract
Inferring the causal structure of a set of random variables from a finite sample of the joint distribution is an important problem in science. The case of two random variables is particularly challenging since no (conditional) independences can be exploited. Recent methods that are based on additive noise models suggest the following principle: Whenever the joint distribution {\bf P}^{(X,Y)} admits such a model in one direction, e.g., Y=f(X)+N, N \perp\kern-6pt \perp X, but does not admit the reversed model X=g(Y)+\tilde{N}, \tilde{N} \perp\kern-6pt \perp Y, one infers the former direction to be causal (i.e., X\rightarrow Y). Up to now, these approaches only dealt with continuous variables. In many situations, however, the variables of interest are discrete or even have only finitely many states. In this work, we extend the notion of additive noise models to these cases. We prove that it almost never occurs that additive noise models can be fit in both directions. We further propose an efficient algorithm that is able to perform this way of causal inference on finite samples of discrete variables. We show that the algorithm works on both synthetic and real data sets.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Spontaneous epigenetic variation in the Arabidopsis thaliana methylome

Becker, C., Hagmann, J., Müller, J., Koenig, D., Stegle, O., Borgwardt, K., Weigel, D.

Nature, 480(7376):245-249, December 2011 (article)

Abstract
Heritable epigenetic polymorphisms, such as differential cytosine methylation, can underlie phenotypic variation1, 2. Moreover, wild strains of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana differ in many epialleles3, 4, and these can influence the expression of nearby genes1, 2. However, to understand their role in evolution5, it is imperative to ascertain the emergence rate and stability of epialleles, including those that are not due to structural variation. We have compared genome-wide DNA methylation among 10 A. thaliana lines, derived 30 generations ago from a common ancestor6. Epimutations at individual positions were easily detected, and close to 30,000 cytosines in each strain were differentially methylated. In contrast, larger regions of contiguous methylation were much more stable, and the frequency of changes was in the same low range as that of DNA mutations7. Like individual positions, the same regions were often affected by differential methylation in independent lines, with evidence for recurrent cycles of forward and reverse mutations. Transposable elements and short interfering RNAs have been causally linked to DNA methylation8. In agreement, differentially methylated sites were farther from transposable elements and showed less association with short interfering RNA expression than invariant positions. The biased distribution and frequent reversion of epimutations have important implications for the potential contribution of sequence-independent epialleles to plant evolution.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Information, learning and falsification

Balduzzi, D.

In pages: 1-4, NIPS Philosophy and Machine Learning Workshop, December 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
There are (at least) three approaches to quantifying information. The first, algorithmic information or Kolmogorov complexity, takes events as strings and, given a universal Turing machine, quantifies the information content of a string as the length of the shortest program producing it [1]. The second, Shannon information, takes events as belonging to ensembles and quantifies the information resulting from observing the given event in terms of the number of alternate events that have been ruled out [2]. The third, statistical learning theory, has introduced measures of capacity that control (in part) the expected risk of classifiers [3]. These capacities quantify the expectations regarding future data that learning algorithms embed into classifiers. Solomonoff and Hutter have applied algorithmic information to prove remarkable results on universal induction. Shannon information provides the mathematical foundation for communication and coding theory. However, both approaches have shortcomings. Algorithmic information is not computable, severely limiting its practical usefulness. Shannon information refers to ensembles rather than actual events: it makes no sense to compute the Shannon information of a single string – or rather, there are many answers to this question depending on how a related ensemble is constructed. Although there are asymptotic results linking algorithmic and Shannon information, it is unsatisfying that there is such a large gap – a difference in kind – between the two measures. This note describes a new method of quantifying information, effective information, that links algorithmic information to Shannon information, and also links both to capacities arising in statistical learning theory [4, 5]. After introducing the measure, we show that it provides a non-universal analog of Kolmogorov complexity. We then apply it to derive basic capacities in statistical learning theory: empirical VC-entropy and empirical Rademacher complexity. A nice byproduct of our approach is an interpretation of the explanatory power of a learning algorithm in terms of the number of hypotheses it falsifies [6], counted in two different ways for the two capacities. We also discuss how effective information relates to information gain, Shannon and mutual information.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Optimization for Machine Learning

Sra, S., Nowozin, S., Wright, S.

pages: 494, Neural information processing series, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2011 (book)

Abstract
The interplay between optimization and machine learning is one of the most important developments in modern computational science. Optimization formulations and methods are proving to be vital in designing algorithms to extract essential knowledge from huge volumes of data. Machine learning, however, is not simply a consumer of optimization technology but a rapidly evolving field that is itself generating new optimization ideas. This book captures the state of the art of the interaction between optimization and machine learning in a way that is accessible to researchers in both fields. Optimization approaches have enjoyed prominence in machine learning because of their wide applicability and attractive theoretical properties. The increasing complexity, size, and variety of today's machine learning models call for the reassessment of existing assumptions. This book starts the process of reassessment. It describes the resurgence in novel contexts of established frameworks such as first-order methods, stochastic approximations, convex relaxations, interior-point methods, and proximal methods. It also devotes attention to newer themes such as regularized optimization, robust optimization, gradient and subgradient methods, splitting techniques, and second-order methods. Many of these techniques draw inspiration from other fields, including operations research, theoretical computer science, and subfields of optimization. The book will enrich the ongoing cross-fertilization between the machine learning community and these other fields, and within the broader optimization community.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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A general linear non-Gaussian state-space model: Identifiability, identification, and applications

Zhang, K., Hyvärinen, A.

In JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings Volume 20, pages: 113-128, (Editors: Hsu, C.-N. , W.S. Lee ), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 3rd Asian Conference on Machine Learning (ACML), November 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
State-space modeling provides a powerful tool for system identification and prediction. In linear state-space models the data are usually assumed to be Gaussian and the models have certain structural constraints such that they are identifiable. In this paper we propose a non-Gaussian state-space model which does not have such constraints. We prove that this model is fully identifiable. We then propose an efficient two-step method for parameter estimation: one first extracts the subspace of the latent processes based on the temporal information of the data, and then performs multichannel blind deconvolution, making use of both the temporal information and non-Gaussianity. We conduct a series of simulations to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Finally, we apply the proposed model and parameter estimation method on real data, including major world stock indices and magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings. Experimental results are encouraging and show the practical usefulness of the proposed model and method.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Non-stationary correction of optical aberrations

Schuler, C., Hirsch, M., Harmeling, S., Schölkopf, B.

In pages: 659-666 , (Editors: DN Metaxas and L Quan and A Sanfeliu and LJ Van Gool), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 13th IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), November 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Taking a sharp photo at several megapixel resolution traditionally relies on high grade lenses. In this paper, we present an approach to alleviate image degradations caused by imperfect optics. We rely on a calibration step to encode the optical aberrations in a space-variant point spread function and obtain a corrected image by non-stationary deconvolution. By including the Bayer array in our image formation model, we can perform demosaicing as part of the deconvolution.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Learning low-rank output kernels

Dinuzzo, F., Fukumizu, K.

In JMLR Workshop and Conference Proceedings Volume 20, pages: 181-196, (Editors: Hsu, C.-N. , W.S. Lee), JMLR, Cambridge, MA, USA, 3rd Asian Conference on Machine Learning (ACML) , November 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Output kernel learning techniques allow to simultaneously learn a vector-valued function and a positive semidefinite matrix which describes the relationships between the outputs. In this paper, we introduce a new formulation that imposes a low-rank constraint on the output kernel and operates directly on a factor of the kernel matrix. First, we investigate the connection between output kernel learning and a regularization problem for an architecture with two layers. Then, we show that a variety of methods such as nuclear norm regularized regression, reduced-rank regression, principal component analysis, and low rank matrix approximation can be seen as special cases of the output kernel learning framework. Finally, we introduce a block coordinate descent strategy for learning low-rank output kernels.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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HHfrag: HMM-based fragment detection using HHpred

Kalev, I., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 27(22):3110-3116, November 2011 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Over the last decade, both static and dynamic fragment libraries for protein structure prediction have been introduced. The former are built from clusters in either sequence or structure space and aim to extract a universal structural alphabet. The latter are tailored for a particular query protein sequence and aim to provide local structural templates that need to be assembled in order to build the full-length structure. Results: Here, we introduce HHfrag, a dynamic HMM-based fragment search method built on the profile–profile comparison tool HHpred. We show that HHfrag provides advantages over existing fragment assignment methods in that it: (i) improves the precision of the fragments at the expense of a minor loss in sequence coverage; (ii) detects fragments of variable length (6–21 amino acid residues); (iii) allows for gapped fragments and (iv) does not assign fragments to regions where there is no clear sequence conservation. We illustrate the usefulness of fragments detected by HHfrag on targets from most recent CASP.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Spatiotemporal mapping of rhythmic activity in the inferior convexity of the macaque prefrontal cortex

Panagiotaropoulos, T., Besserve, M., Crocker, B., Kapoor, V., Tolias, A., Panzeri, S., Logothetis, N.

41(239.15), 41st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), November 2011 (poster)

Abstract
The inferior convexity of the macaque prefrontal cortex (icPFC) is known to be involved in higher order processing of sensory information mediating stimulus selection, attention and working memory. Until now, the vast majority of electrophysiological investigations of the icPFC employed single electrode recordings. As a result, relatively little is known about the spatiotemporal structure of neuronal activity in this cortical area. Here we study in detail the spatiotemporal properties of local field potentials (LFP's) in the icPFC using multi electrode recordings during anesthesia. We computed the LFP-LFP coherence as a function of frequency for thousands of pairs of simultaneously recorded sites anterior to the arcuate and inferior to the principal sulcus. We observed two distinct peaks of coherent oscillatory activity between approximately 4-10 and 15-25 Hz. We then quantified the instantaneous phase of these frequency bands using the Hilbert transform and found robust phase gradients across recording sites. The dependency of the phase on the spatial location reflects the existence of traveling waves of electrical activity in the icPFC. The dominant axis of these traveling waves roughly followed the ventral-dorsal plane. Preliminary results show that repeated visual stimulation with a 10s movie had no dramatic effect on the spatial structure of the traveling waves. Traveling waves of electrical activity in the icPFC could reflect highly organized cortical processing in this area of prefrontal cortex.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Reward-Weighted Regression with Sample Reuse for Direct Policy Search in Reinforcement Learning

Hachiya, H., Peters, J., Sugiyama, M.

Neural Computation, 23(11):2798-2832, November 2011 (article)

Abstract
Direct policy search is a promising reinforcement learning framework, in particular for controlling continuous, high-dimensional systems. Policy search often requires a large number of samples for obtaining a stable policy update estimator, and this is prohibitive when the sampling cost is expensive. In this letter, we extend an expectation-maximization-based policy search method so that previously collected samples can be efficiently reused. The usefulness of the proposed method, reward-weighted regression with sample reuse (R), is demonstrated through robot learning experiments.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Stability Condition for Teleoperation System with Packet Loss

Hong, A., Cho, JH., Lee, DY.

In pages: 760-761, 2011 KSME Annual Fall Conference, November 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper focuses on the stability condition of teleoperation system where there is a packet loss in communication channel. Communication channel between master and slave cause packet loss and it obviously leads to a performance degradation and instability of teleoperation system. We consider two-channel control architecture for teleoperation system, and control inputs to remote site are produced by position of master and slave. In this paper, teleoperation system is modeled in discrete domain to include packet loss process. Also, the stability condition for teleoperation system with packet loss is discussed with input-to-state stability. Finally, the stability condition is presented in LMI approach.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Model Learning in Robotics: a Survey

Nguyen-Tuong, D., Peters, J.

Cognitive Processing, 12(4):319-340, November 2011 (article)

Abstract
Models are among the most essential tools in robotics, such as kinematics and dynamics models of the robot's own body and controllable external objects. It is widely believed that intelligent mammals also rely on internal models in order to generate their actions. However, while classical robotics relies on manually generated models that are based on human insights into physics, future autonomous, cognitive robots need to be able to automatically generate models that are based on information which is extracted from the data streams accessible to the robot. In this paper, we survey the progress in model learning with a strong focus on robot control on a kinematic as well as dynamical level. Here, a model describes essential information about the behavior of the environment and the in uence of an agent on this environment. In the context of model based learning control, we view the model from three di fferent perspectives. First, we need to study the di erent possible model learning architectures for robotics. Second, we discuss what kind of problems these architecture and the domain of robotics imply for the applicable learning methods. From this discussion, we deduce future directions of real-time learning algorithms. Third, we show where these scenarios have been used successfully in several case studies.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Fast removal of non-uniform camera shake

Hirsch, M., Schuler, C., Harmeling, S., Schölkopf, B.

In pages: 463-470 , (Editors: DN Metaxas and L Quan and A Sanfeliu and LJ Van Gool), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 13th IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), November 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Camera shake leads to non-uniform image blurs. State-of-the-art methods for removing camera shake model the blur as a linear combination of homographically transformed versions of the true image. While this is conceptually interesting, the resulting algorithms are computationally demanding. In this paper we develop a forward model based on the efficient filter flow framework, incorporating the particularities of camera shake, and show how an efficient algorithm for blur removal can be obtained. Comprehensive comparisons on a number of real-world blurry images show that our approach is not only substantially faster, but it also leads to better deblurring results.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Home 3D body scans from noisy image and range data

Weiss, A., Hirshberg, D., Black, M.

In Int. Conf. on Computer Vision (ICCV), pages: 1951-1958, IEEE, Barcelona, November 2011 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The 3D shape of the human body is useful for applications in fitness, games and apparel. Accurate body scanners, however, are expensive, limiting the availability of 3D body models. We present a method for human shape reconstruction from noisy monocular image and range data using a single inexpensive commodity sensor. The approach combines low-resolution image silhouettes with coarse range data to estimate a parametric model of the body. Accurate 3D shape estimates are obtained by combining multiple monocular views of a person moving in front of the sensor. To cope with varying body pose, we use a SCAPE body model which factors 3D body shape and pose variations. This enables the estimation of a single consistent shape while allowing pose to vary. Additionally, we describe a novel method to minimize the distance between the projected 3D body contour and the image silhouette that uses analytic derivatives of the objective function. We propose a simple method to estimate standard body measurements from the recovered SCAPE model and show that the accuracy of our method is competitive with commercial body scanning systems costing orders of magnitude more.

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pdf YouTube poster Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

pdf YouTube poster Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Cooperative Cuts: a new use of submodularity in image segmentation

Jegelka, S.

Second I.S.T. Austria Symposium on Computer Vision and Machine Learning, October 2011 (talk)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]