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2010


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Teleoperated 3-D force feedback from the nanoscale with an atomic force microscope

Onal, C. D., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on nanotechnology, 9(1):46-54, IEEE, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

2010


[BibTex]


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Roll and pitch motion analysis of a biologically inspired quadruped water runner robot

Park, H. S., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 29(10):1281-1297, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microstructured elastomeric surfaces with reversible adhesion and examples of their use in deterministic assembly by transfer printing

Kim, Seok, Wu, Jian, Carlson, Andrew, Jin, Sung Hun, Kovalsky, Anton, Glass, Paul, Liu, Zhuangjian, Ahmed, Numair, Elgan, Steven L, Chen, Weiqiu, others

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(40):17095-17100, National Acad Sciences, 2010 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Tankbot: A palm-size, tank-like climbing robot using soft elastomer adhesive treads

Unver, O., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 29(14):1761-1777, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Playful Machines: Tutorial

Der, R., Martius, G.

\urlhttp://robot.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/tutorial?lang=en, 2010 (misc)

al

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Entnetzung verspannter Filme

Reindl, A.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2010 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Advanced ferromagnetic nanostructures

Goll, D.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2010 (phdthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Wasserstoff in funktionellen Dünnschichtsystemen

Honert, J.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2010 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hydrogen spillover measurements of unbridged and bridged metal-organic frameworks - revisited

Campesi, R., Cuevas, F., Latroche, M., Hirscher, M.

{Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics}, 12, pages: 10457-10459, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Relating Gilbert damping and ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization

Fähnle, M., Seib, J., Illg, C.

{Physical Review B}, 82, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ferromagnetic properties of the Mn-doped nanograined ZnO films

Straumal, B. B., Protasova, S. G., Mazilkin, A. A., Myatiev, A. A., Straumal, P. B., Schütz, G., Goering, E., Baretzky, B.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 108, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Unusual super-ductility at room temperature in an ultrafine-grained aluminum alloy

Valiev, R. Z., Murashkin, M. Y., Kilmametov, A., Straumal, B., Chinh, N. Q., Langdon, T.

In 45, pages: 4718-4724, Seattle, WA, USA, 2010 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Demagnetization on the fs time-scale by the Elliott-Yafet mechanism

Steiauf, D., Illg, C., Fähnle, M.

In 200, Karlsruhe, Germany, 2010 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ubiquity of ferromagnetic signals in common diamagnetic oxide crystals

Khalid, M., Setzer, A., Ziese, M., Esquinazi, P., Spemann, D., Pöppl, A., Goering, E.

{Physical Review B}, 81(21), 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Calculation of the Gilbert damping matrix at low scattering rates in Gd

Seib, J., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 82, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Adsorption technologies

Schmitz, B., Hirscher, M.

In Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, pages: 431-445, WILEY-VCH, Weinheim, 2010 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Swift heavy ions for controlled modification of soft magnetic properties of Fe0.85N0.15 thin film

Gupta, R., Gupta, A., Bhatt, R., Rüffer, R., Avasthi, D. K.

{Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter}, 22(22), 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Constrained Accelerations for Controlled Geometric Reduction: Sagittal-Plane Decoupling for Bipedal Locomotion

Gregg, R., Righetti, L., Buchli, J., Schaal, S.

In 2010 10th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 1-7, IEEE, Nashville, USA, 2010 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Energy-shaping control methods have produced strong theoretical results for asymptotically stable 3D bipedal dynamic walking in the literature. In particular, geometric controlled reduction exploits robot symmetries to control momentum conservation laws that decouple the sagittal-plane dynamics, which are easier to stabilize. However, the associated control laws require high-dimensional matrix inverses multiplied with complicated energy-shaping terms, often making these control theories difficult to apply to highly-redundant humanoid robots. This paper presents a first step towards the application of energy-shaping methods on real robots by casting controlled reduction into a framework of constrained accelerations for inverse dynamics control. By representing momentum conservation laws as constraints in acceleration space, we construct a general expression for desired joint accelerations that render the constraint surface invariant. By appropriately choosing an orthogonal projection, we show that the unconstrained (reduced) dynamics are decoupled from the constrained dynamics. Any acceleration-based controller can then be used to stabilize this planar subsystem, including passivity-based methods. The resulting control law is surprisingly simple and represents a practical way to employ control theoretic stability results in robotic platforms. Simulated walking of a 3D compass-gait biped show correspondence between the new and original controllers, and simulated motions of a 16-DOF humanoid demonstrate the applicability of this method.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Variable impedance control - a reinforcement learning approach

Buchli, J., Theodorou, E., Stulp, F., Schaal, S.

In Robotics Science and Systems (2010), Zaragoza, Spain, June 27-30, 2010, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
One of the hallmarks of the performance, versatility, and robustness of biological motor control is the ability to adapt the impedance of the overall biomechanical system to different task requirements and stochastic disturbances. A transfer of this principle to robotics is desirable, for instance to enable robots to work robustly and safely in everyday human environments. It is, however, not trivial to derive variable impedance controllers for practical high DOF robotic tasks. In this contribution, we accomplish such gain scheduling with a reinforcement learning approach algorithm, PI2 (Policy Improvement with Path Integrals). PI2 is a model-free, sampling based learning method derived from first principles of optimal control. The PI2 algorithm requires no tuning of algorithmic parameters besides the exploration noise. The designer can thus fully focus on cost function design to specify the task. From the viewpoint of robotics, a particular useful property of PI2 is that it can scale to problems of many DOFs, so that RL on real robotic systems becomes feasible. We sketch the PI2 algorithm and its theoretical properties, and how it is applied to gain scheduling. We evaluate our approach by presenting results on two different simulated robotic systems, a 3-DOF Phantom Premium Robot and a 6-DOF Kuka Lightweight Robot. We investigate tasks where the optimal strategy requires both tuning of the impedance of the end-effector, and tuning of a reference trajectory. The results show that we can use path integral based RL not only for planning but also to derive variable gain feedback controllers in realistic scenarios. Thus, the power of variable impedance control is made available to a wide variety of robotic systems and practical applications.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Note: Aligned deposition and modal characterization of micron and submicron poly (methyl methacyrlate) fiber cantilevers

Nain, A. S., Filiz, S., Burak Ozdoganlar, O., Sitti, M., Amon, C.

Review of Scientific Instruments, 81(1):016102, AIP, 2010 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Surface tension driven water strider robot using circular footpads

Ozcan, O., Wang, H., Taylor, J. D., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2010 IEEE International Conference on, pages: 3799-3804, 2010 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Atomic-Force-Microscopy-Based Nanomanipulation Systems

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

In Handbook of Nanophysics: Nanomedicine and Nanorobotics, pages: 1-15, CRC Press, 2010 (incollection)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Enhanced adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide elastomers via viscoelasticity tuning

Chung, H., Glass, P., Pothen, J. M., Sitti, M., Washburn, N. R.

Biomacromolecules, 12(2):342-347, American Chemical Society, 2010 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Taming the Beast: Guided Self-organization of Behavior in Autonomous Robots

Martius, G., Herrmann, J. M.

In From Animals to Animats 11, 6226, pages: 50-61, LNCS, Springer, 2010 (incollection)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Inverse dynamics with optimal distribution of ground reaction forces for legged robot

Righetti, L., Buchli, J., Mistry, M., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots (CLAWAR), pages: 580-587, Nagoya, Japan, sep 2010 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Contact interaction with the environment is crucial in the design of locomotion controllers for legged robots, to prevent slipping for example. Therefore, it is of great importance to be able to control the effects of the robots movements on the contact reaction forces. In this contribution, we extend a recent inverse dynamics algorithm for floating base robots to optimize the distribution of contact forces while achieving precise trajectory tracking. The resulting controller is algorithmically simple as compared to other approaches. Numerical simulations show that this result significantly increases the range of possible movements of a humanoid robot as compared to the previous inverse dynamics algorithm. We also present a simplification of the result where no inversion of the inertia matrix is needed which is particularly relevant for practical use on a real robot. Such an algorithm becomes interesting for agile locomotion of robots on difficult terrains where the contacts with the environment are critical, such as walking over rough or slippery terrain.

am mg

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Laterally driven interfaces in the three-dimensional Ising lattice gas

Smith, T. H. R., Vasilyev, O., Maciolek, A., Schmidt, M.

{Physical Review E}, 82(2), 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Handbook of Hydrogen Storage

Hirscher, M.

pages: 353 p., Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2010 (book)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Samarium-cobalt 2:17 magnets: identifying Smn+1Co5n-1 phases stabilized by Zr

Stadelmaier, H. H., Kronmüller, H., Goll, D.

{Scripta Materialia}, 63, pages: 843-846, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Planar metamaterial analogue of electromagnetically induced transparancy for plasmonic sensing

Liu, N., Weiss, T., Mesch, M., Langguth, L., Eigenthaler, U., Hirscher, M., Sönnichsen, C., Giessen, H.

{Nano Letters}, 10, pages: 1103-1107, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Explaining the paradoxical diversity of ultrafast last-induced demagnetization

Koopmans, B., Malinowski, G., Dalla Longa, F., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M., Roth, T., Cinchetti, M., Aeschlimann, M.

{Nature Materials}, 9, pages: 259-265, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A high heat of adsorption for hydrogen in magnesium formate

Schmitz, B., Krkljus, I., Leung, E., Höffken, H. W., Müller, U., Hirscher, M.

{ChemSusChem}, 3, pages: 758-761, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Force induced destabilization of adhesion complexes at defined integrin spacings on nanostructured surfaces

de Beer, A. G. F., Cavalcanti-Adam, E. A., Majer, G., López-Garc\’\ia, M., Kessler, H., Spatz, J. P.

{Physical Review E}, 81, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The X-ray microscopy beamline UE46-PGM2 at BESSY

Follath, R., Schmidt, J. S., Weigand, M., Fauth, K.

In 10th International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation, 1234, pages: 323-326, AIP Conference Proceedings, American Institute of Physics, Melbourne, Australia, 2010 (inproceedings)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Anisotropic damping of the magnetization dynamics in Ni, Co, and Fe

Gilmore, K., Stiles, M. D., Seib, J., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 81, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Influence of [Mo6Br8F6]2- cluster inclusion within the mesoporous solid MIL-101 on hydrogen storage performance

Dybtsev, D., Serre, C., Schmitz, B., Panella, B., Hirscher, M., Latroche, M., Llewellyn, P. L., Cordier, S., Molard, Y., Haouas, M., Taulelle, F., Férey, G.

{Langmuir}, 26(13):11283-11290, 2010 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Grain boundary layers in nanocrystalline ferromagnetic zinc oxide

Straumal, B. B., Myatiev, A. A., Straumal, P. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Goering, E., Baretzky, B.

{JETP Letters}, 92(6):396-400, 2010 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2007


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Reaction graph kernels for discovering missing enzymes in the plant secondary metabolism

Saigo, H., Hattori, M., Tsuda, K.

NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology, December 2007 (talk)

Abstract
Secondary metabolic pathway in plant is important for finding druggable candidate enzymes. However, there are many enzymes whose functions are still undiscovered especially in organism-specific metabolic pathways. We propose reaction graph kernels for automatically assigning the EC numbers to unknown enzymatic reactions in a metabolic network. Experiments are carried out on KEGG/REACTION database and our method successfully predicted the first three digits of the EC number with 83% accuracy.We also exhaustively predicted missing enzymatic functions in the plant secondary metabolism pathways, and evaluated our results in biochemical validity.

ei

Web [BibTex]

2007


Web [BibTex]


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Positional Oligomer Importance Matrices

Sonnenburg, S., Zien, A., Philips, P., Rätsch, G.

NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology, December 2007 (talk)

Abstract
At the heart of many important bioinformatics problems, such as gene finding and function prediction, is the classification of biological sequences, above all of DNA and proteins. In many cases, the most accurate classifiers are obtained by training SVMs with complex sequence kernels, for instance for transcription starts or splice sites. However, an often criticized downside of SVMs with complex kernels is that it is very hard for humans to understand the learned decision rules and to derive biological insights from them. To close this gap, we introduce the concept of positional oligomer importance matrices (POIMs) and develop an efficient algorithm for their computation. We demonstrate how they overcome the limitations of sequence logos, and how they can be used to find relevant motifs for different biological phenomena in a straight-forward way. Note that the concept of POIMs is not limited to interpreting SVMs, but is applicable to general k−mer based scoring systems.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Machine Learning Algorithms for Polymorphism Detection

Schweikert, G., Zeller, G., Weigel, D., Schölkopf, B., Rätsch, G.

NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology, December 2007 (talk)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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A Tutorial on Spectral Clustering

von Luxburg, U.

Statistics and Computing, 17(4):395-416, December 2007 (article)

Abstract
In recent years, spectral clustering has become one of the most popular modern clustering algorithms. It is simple to implement, can be solved efficiently by standard linear algebra software, and very often outperforms traditional clustering algorithms such as the k-means algorithm. On the first glance spectral clustering appears slightly mysterious, and it is not obvious to see why it works at all and what it really does. The goal of this tutorial is to give some intuition on those questions. We describe different graph Laplacians and their basic properties, present the most common spectral clustering algorithms, and derive those algorithms from scratch by several different approaches. Advantages and disadvantages of the different spectral clustering algorithms are discussed.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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An Automated Combination of Kernels for Predicting Protein Subcellular Localization

Zien, A., Ong, C.

NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology, December 2007 (talk)

Abstract
Protein subcellular localization is a crucial ingredient to many important inferences about cellular processes, including prediction of protein function and protein interactions.We propose a new class of protein sequence kernels which considers all motifs including motifs with gaps. This class of kernels allows the inclusion of pairwise amino acid distances into their computation. We utilize an extension of the multiclass support vector machine (SVM)method which directly solves protein subcellular localization without resorting to the common approach of splitting the problem into several binary classification problems. To automatically search over families of possible amino acid motifs, we optimize over multiple kernels at the same time. We compare our automated approach to four other predictors on three different datasets, and show that we perform better than the current state of the art. Furthermore, our method provides some insights as to which features are most useful for determining subcellular localization, which are in agreement with biological reasoning.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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A Tutorial on Kernel Methods for Categorization

Jäkel, F., Schölkopf, B., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 51(6):343-358, December 2007 (article)

Abstract
The abilities to learn and to categorize are fundamental for cognitive systems, be it animals or machines, and therefore have attracted attention from engineers and psychologists alike. Modern machine learning methods and psychological models of categorization are remarkably similar, partly because these two fields share a common history in artificial neural networks and reinforcement learning. However, machine learning is now an independent and mature field that has moved beyond psychologically or neurally inspired algorithms towards providing foundations for a theory of learning that is rooted in statistics and functional analysis. Much of this research is potentially interesting for psychological theories of learning and categorization but also hardly accessible for psychologists. Here, we provide a tutorial introduction to a popular class of machine learning tools, called kernel methods. These methods are closely related to perceptrons, radial-basis-function neural networks and exemplar theories of catego rization. Recent theoretical advances in machine learning are closely tied to the idea that the similarity of patterns can be encapsulated in a positive definite kernel. Such a positive definite kernel can define a reproducing kernel Hilbert space which allows one to use powerful tools from functional analysis for the analysis of learning algorithms. We give basic explanations of some key concepts—the so-called kernel trick, the representer theorem and regularization—which may open up the possibility that insights from machine learning can feed back into psychology.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Accurate Splice site Prediction Using Support Vector Machines

Sonnenburg, S., Schweikert, G., Philips, P., Behr, J., Rätsch, G.

BMC Bioinformatics, 8(Supplement 10):1-16, December 2007 (article)

Abstract
Background: For splice site recognition, one has to solve two classification problems: discriminating true from decoy splice sites for both acceptor and donor sites. Gene finding systems typically rely on Markov Chains to solve these tasks. Results: In this work we consider Support Vector Machines for splice site recognition. We employ the so-called weighted degree kernel which turns out well suited for this task, as we will illustrate in several experiments where we compare its prediction accuracy with that of recently proposed systems. We apply our method to the genome-wide recognition of splice sites in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana, Danio rerio, and Homo sapiens. Our performance estimates indicate that splice sites can be recognized very accurately in these genomes and that our method outperforms many other methods including Markov Chains, GeneSplicer and SpliceMachine. We provide genome-wide predictions of splice sites and a stand-alone prediction tool ready to be used for incorporation in a gene finder. Availability: Data, splits, additional information on the model selection, the whole genome predictions, as well as the stand-alone prediction tool are available for download at http:// www.fml.mpg.de/raetsch/projects/splice.

ei

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Challenges in Brain-Computer Interface Development: Induction, Measurement, Decoding, Integration

Hill, NJ.

Invited keynote talk at the launch of BrainGain, the Dutch BCI research consortium, November 2007 (talk)

Abstract
I‘ll present a perspective on Brain-Computer Interface development from T{\"u}bingen. Some of the benefits promised by BCI technology lie in the near foreseeable future, and some further away. Our motivation is to make BCI technology feasible for the people who could benefit from what it has to offer soon: namely, people in the "completely locked-in" state. I‘ll mention some of the challenges of working with this user group, and explain the specific directions they have motivated us to take in developing experimental methods, algorithms, and software.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Towards compliant humanoids: an experimental assessment of suitable task space position/orientation controllers

Nakanishi, J., Mistry, M., Peters, J., Schaal, S.

In IROS 2007, 2007, pages: 2520-2527, (Editors: Grant, E. , T. C. Henderson), IEEE Service Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, November 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Compliant control will be a prerequisite for humanoid robotics if these robots are supposed to work safely and robustly in human and/or dynamic environments. One view of compliant control is that a robot should control a minimal number of degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) directly, i.e., those relevant DOFs for the task, and keep the remaining DOFs maximally compliant, usually in the null space of the task. This view naturally leads to task space control. However, surprisingly few implementations of task space control can be found in actual humanoid robots. This paper makes a first step towards assessing the usefulness of task space controllers for humanoids by investigating which choices of controllers are available and what inherent control characteristics they have—this treatment will concern position and orientation control, where the latter is based on a quaternion formulation. Empirical evaluations on an anthropomorphic Sarcos master arm illustrate the robustness of the different controllers as well as the eas e of implementing and tuning them. Our extensive empirical results demonstrate that simpler task space controllers, e.g., classical resolved motion rate control or resolved acceleration control can be quite advantageous in face of inevitable modeling errors in model-based control, and that well chosen formulations are easy to implement and quite robust, such that they are useful for humanoids.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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MR-Based PET Attenuation Correction: Method and Validation

Hofmann, M., Steinke, F., Scheel, V., Charpiat, G., Brady, M., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS-MIC 2007), 2007(M16-6):1-2, November 2007 (poster)

Abstract
PET/MR combines the high soft tissue contrast of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and the functional information of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). For quantitative PET information, correction of tissue photon attenuation is mandatory. Usually in conventional PET, the attenuation map is obtained from a transmission scan, which uses a rotating source, or from the CT scan in case of combined PET/CT. In the case of a PET/MR scanner, there is insufficient space for the rotating source and ideally one would want to calculate the attenuation map from the MR image instead. Since MR images provide information about proton density of the different tissue types, it is not trivial to use this data for PET attenuation correction. We present a method for predicting the PET attenuation map from a given the MR image, using a combination of atlas-registration and recognition of local patterns. Using "leave one out cross validation" we show on a database of 16 MR-CT image pairs that our method reliably allows estimating the CT image from the MR image. Subsequently, as in PET/CT, the PET attenuation map can be predicted from the CT image. On an additional dataset of MR/CT/PET triplets we quantitatively validate that our approach allows PET quantification with an error that is smaller than what would be clinically significant. We demonstrate our approach on T1-weighted human brain scans. However, the presented methods are more general and current research focuses on applying the established methods to human whole body PET/MRI applications.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Estimating receptive fields without spike-triggering

Macke, J., Zeck, G., Bethge, M.

37th annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2007), 37(768.1):1, November 2007 (poster)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Evaluation of Deformable Registration Methods for MR-CT Atlas Alignment

Scheel, V., Hofmann, M., Rehfeld, N., Judenhofer, M., Claussen, C., Pichler, B.

2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS-MIC 2007), 2007(M13-121):1, November 2007 (poster)

Abstract
Deformable registration methods are essential for multimodality imaging. Many different methods exist but due to the complexity of the deformed images a direct comparison of the methods is difficult. One particular application that requires high accuracy registration of MR-CT images is atlas-based attenuation correction for PET/MR. We compare four deformable registration algorithms for 3D image data included in the Open Source "National Library of Medicine Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit" (ITK). An interactive landmark based registration using MiraView (Siemens) has been used as gold standard. The automatic algorithms provided by ITK are based on the metrics Mattes mutual information as well as on normalized mutual information. The transformations are calculated by interpolating over a uniform B-Spline grid laying over the image to be warped. The algorithms were tested on head images from 10 subjects. We implemented a measure which segments head interior bone and air based on the CT images and l ow intensity classes of corresponding MRI images. The segmentation of bone is performed by individually calculating the lowest Hounsfield unit threshold for each CT image. The compromise is made by quantifying the number of overlapping voxels of the remaining structures. We show that the algorithms provided by ITK achieve similar or better accuracy than the time-consuming interactive landmark based registration. Thus, ITK provides an ideal platform to generate accurately fused datasets from different modalities, required for example for building training datasets for Atlas-based attenuation correction.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Some Theoretical Aspects of Human Categorization Behavior: Similarity and Generalization

Jäkel, F.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, November 2007, passed with "ausgezeichnet", summa cum laude, published online (phdthesis)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]