Header logo is


2009


no image
Proton NMR studies of the NaAlH4 structure

Valiente-Banuet, L. E., Majer, G., Müller, K.

{Journal of Magnetic Resonance}, 200, pages: 280-284, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

2009


DOI [BibTex]


no image
The SL simulation and real-time control software package

Schaal, S.

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2009, clmc (techreport)

Abstract
SL was originally developed as a Simulation Laboratory software package to allow creating complex rigid-body dynamics simulations with minimal development times. It was meant to complement a real-time robotics setup such that robot programs could first be debugged in simulation before trying them on the actual robot. For this purpose, the motor control setup of SL was copied from our experience with real-time robot setups with vxWorks (Windriver Systems, Inc.)â??indeed, more than 90% of the code is identical to the actual robot software, as will be explained later in detail. As a result, SL is divided into three software components: 1) the generic code that is shared by the actual robot and the simulation, 2) the robot specific code, and 3) the simulation specific code. The robot specific code is tailored to the robotic environments that we have experienced over the years, in particular towards VME-based multi-processor real-time operating systems. The simulation specific code has all the components for OpenGL graphics simulations and mimics the robot multi-processor environment in simple C-code. Importantly, SL can be used stand-alone for creating graphics an-imationsâ??the heritage from real-time robotics does not restrict the complexity of possible simulations. This technical report describes SL in detail and can serve as a manual for new users of SL.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Learning and generalization of motor skills by learning from demonstration

Pastor, P., Hoffmann, H., Asfour, T., Schaal, S.

In International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2009), Kobe, Japan, May 12-19, 2009, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We provide a general approach for learning robotic motor skills from human demonstration. To represent an observed movement, a non-linear differential equation is learned such that it reproduces this movement. Based on this representation, we build a library of movements by labeling each recorded movement according to task and context (e.g., grasping, placing, and releasing). Our differential equation is formulated such that generalization can be achieved simply by adapting a start and a goal parameter in the equation to the desired position values of a movement. For object manipulation, we present how our framework extends to the control of gripper orientation and finger position. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated in simulation as well as on a real robot. The robot learned a pick-and-place operation and a water-serving task and could generalize these tasks to novel situations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Compliant quadruped locomotion over rough terrain

Buchli, J., Kalakrishnan, M., Mistry, M., Pastor, P., Schaal, S.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 814-820, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Many critical elements for statically stable walking for legged robots have been known for a long time, including stability criteria based on support polygons, good foothold selection, recovery strategies to name a few. All these criteria have to be accounted for in the planning as well as the control phase. Most legged robots usually employ high gain position control, which means that it is crucially important that the planned reference trajectories are a good match for the actual terrain, and that tracking is accurate. Such an approach leads to conservative controllers, i.e. relatively low speed, ground speed matching, etc. Not surprisingly such controllers are not very robust - they are not suited for the real world use outside of the laboratory where the knowledge of the world is limited and error prone. Thus, to achieve robust robotic locomotion in the archetypical domain of legged systems, namely complex rough terrain, where the size of the obstacles are in the order of leg length, additional elements are required. A possible solution to improve the robustness of legged locomotion is to maximize the compliance of the controller. While compliance is trivially achieved by reduced feedback gains, for terrain requiring precise foot placement (e.g. climbing rocks, walking over pegs or cracks) compliance cannot be introduced at the cost of inferior tracking. Thus, model-based control and - in contrast to passive dynamic walkers - active balance control is required. To achieve these objectives, in this paper we add two crucial elements to legged locomotion, i.e., floating-base inverse dynamics control and predictive force control, and we show that these elements increase robustness in face of unknown and unanticipated perturbations (e.g. obstacles). Furthermore, we introduce a novel line-based COG trajectory planner, which yields a simpler algorithm than traditional polygon based methods and creates the appropriate input to our control system.We show results from bot- h simulation and real world of a robotic dog walking over non-perceived obstacles and rocky terrain. The results prove the effectivity of the inverse dynamics/force controller. The presented results show that we have all elements needed for robust all-terrain locomotion, which should also generalize to other legged systems, e.g., humanoid robots.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
A scaled bilateral control system for experimental one-dimensional teleoperated nanomanipulation

Onal, C. D., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 28(4):484-497, Sage Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A Swallowable Tethered Capsule Endoscope for Diagnosing Barrett’s Esophagus

Glass, P., Sitti, M., Pennathur, A., Appasamy, R.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 69(5):AB106, Mosby, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
A miniature ceiling walking robot with flat tacky elastomeric footpads

Unver, O., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 2276-2281, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Adhesion of biologically inspired polymer microfibers on soft surfaces

Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6613-6616, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives

Sitti, M., Cusick, B., Aksak, B., Nese, A., Lee, H., Dong, H., Kowalewski, T., Matyjaszewski, K.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(10):2277-2287, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A Sensor-Based Learning Algorithm for the Self-Organization of Robot Behavior

Hesse, F., Martius, G., Der, R., Herrmann, J. M.

Algorithms, 2(1):398-409, 2009 (article)

Abstract
Ideally, sensory information forms the only source of information to a robot. We consider an algorithm for the self-organization of a controller. At short timescales the controller is merely reactive but the parameter dynamics and the acquisition of knowledge by an internal model lead to seemingly purposeful behavior on longer timescales. As a paradigmatic example, we study the simulation of an underactuated snake-like robot. By interacting with the real physical system formed by the robotic hardware and the environment, the controller achieves a sensitive and body-specific actuation of the robot.

al

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Metal-Organic Frameworks

Panella, B., Hirscher, M.

In Encyclopedia of Electrochemical Power Sources, pages: 493-496, Elsevier, Amsterdam [et al.], 2009 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
In-situ - Untersuchungen zu Interdiffusion und Magnetismus in magnetischen Multilayern

Schmidt, M.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2009 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Magnetism of FePt surface alloys

Honolka, J., Lee, T. Y., Kuhnke, K., Enders, A., Skomski, R., Bornemann, S., Mankovsky, S., Minár, J., Staunton, J., Ebert, H., Hessler, M., Fauth, K., Schütz, G., Buchsbaum, A., Schmid, M., Varga, P., Kern, K.

{Physical Review Letters}, 102(6), 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Enhanced 95Zr diffusion in grain boundaries of nano-crystalline ZrO2 \mbox⋅ 9.5 mol\textpercent Y2O3

Drings, H., Brossmann, U., Carstanjen, H. D., Szökefalvi-Nagy, A., Noll, C., Schaefer, H.-E.

{Physica Status Solidi (A)}, 206(1):54-58, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Magnetism of nanostructured materials for advanced magnetic recording

Goll, D.

{International Journal of Materials Research}, 100, pages: 652-662, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Vortex core switching by coherent excitation with single in-plane magnetic field pulses

Weigand, M., van Waeyenberge, B., Vansteenkiste, A., Curcic, M., Sackmann, V., Stoll, H., Tyliszczak, T., Kaznatcheev, K., Bertwistle, D., Woltersdorf, G., Back, C. H., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review Letters}, 102, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Increase of Mn solubility with decreasing grain size in ZnO

Straumal, B., Baretzky, B., Mazilkin, A., Protasova, S., Myatiev, A., Straumal, P.

{Journal of the European Ceramic Society}, 29(10):1963-1970, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Fe-C nanograined alloys obtained by high-pressure torsion: Structure and magnetic properties

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Protasova, S. G., Dobatkin, S. V., Rodin, A. O., Baretzky, B., Goll, D., Schütz, G.

{Materials Science and Engineering A}, 503, pages: 185-189, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Chiral symmetry breaking of magnetic vortices by sample roughness

Vansteenkiste, A., Weigand, M., Curcic, M., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Van Waeyenberge, B.

{New Journal of Physics}, 11, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Extended s-d model for magnetization dynamics of strongly noncollinear configurations

De Angeli, L., Steiauf, D., Singer, R., Köberle, I., Dietermann, F., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Incorporating Muscle Activation-Contraction dynamics to an optimal control framework for finger movements

Theodorou, Evangelos A., Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2009), 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Recent experimental and theoretical work [1] investigated the neural control of contact transition between motion and force during tapping with the index finger as a nonlinear optimization problem. Such transitions from motion to well-directed contact force are a fundamental part of dexterous manipulation. There are 3 alternative hypotheses of how this transition could be accomplished by the nervous system as a function of changes in direction and magnitude of the torque vector controlling the finger. These hypotheses are 1) an initial change in direction with a subsequent change in magnitude of the torque vector; 2) an initial change in magnitude with a subsequent directional change of the torque vector; and 3) a simultaneous and proportionally equal change of both direction and magnitude of the torque vector. Experimental work in [2] shows that the nervous system selects the first strategy, and in [1] we suggest that this may in fact be the optimal strategy. In [4] the framework of Iterative Linear Quadratic Optimal Regulator (ILQR) was extended to incorporate motion and force control. However, our prior simulation work assumed direct and instantaneous control of joint torques, which ignores the known delays and filtering properties of skeletal muscle. In this study, we implement an ILQR controller for a more biologically plausible biomechanical model of the index finger than [4], and add activation-contraction dynamics to the system to simulate muscle function. The planar biomechanical model includes the kinematics of the 3 joints while the applied torques are driven by activation?contraction dynamics with biologically plausible time constants [3]. In agreement with our experimental work [2], the task is to, within 500 ms, move the finger from a given resting configuration to target configuration with a desired terminal velocity. ILQR does not only stabilize the finger dynamics according to the objective function, but it also generates smooth joint space trajectories with minimal tuning and without an a-priori initial control policy (which is difficult to find for highly dimensional biomechanical systems). Furthemore, the use of this optimal control framework and the addition of activation-contraction dynamics considers the full nonlinear dynamics of the index finger and produces a sequence of postures which are compatible with experimental motion data [2]. These simulations combined with prior experimental results suggest that optimal control is a strong candidate for the generation of finger movements prior to abrupt motion-to-force transitions. This work is funded in part by grants NIH R01 0505520 and NSF EFRI-0836042 to Dr. Francisco J. Valero- Cuevas 1 Venkadesan M, Valero-Cuevas FJ. 
Effects of neuromuscular lags on controlling contact transitions. 
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: 2008. 2 Venkadesan M, Valero-Cuevas FJ. 
Neural Control of Motion-to-Force Transitions with the Fingertip. 
J. Neurosci., Feb 2008; 28: 1366 - 1373; 3 Zajac. Muscle and tendon: properties, models, scaling, and application to biomechanics and motor control. Crit Rev Biomed Eng, 17 4. Weiwei Li., Francisco Valero Cuevas: ?Linear Quadratic Optimal Control of Contact Transition with Fingertip ? ACC 2009

am

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Inertial parameter estimation of floating-base humanoid systems using partial force sensing

Mistry, M., Schaal, S., Yamane, K.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2009), Paris, Dec.7-10, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, several controllers have been proposed for humanoid robots which rely on full-body dynamic models. The estimation of inertial parameters from data is a critical component for obtaining accurate models for control. However, floating base systems, such as humanoid robots, incur added challenges to this task (e.g. contact forces must be measured, contact states can change, etc.) In this work, we outline a theoretical framework for whole body inertial parameter estimation, including the unactuated floating base. Using a least squares minimization approach, conducted within the nullspace of unmeasured degrees of freedom, we are able to use a partial force sensor set for full-body estimation, e.g. using only joint torque sensors, allowing for estimation when contact force measurement is unavailable or unreliable (e.g. due to slipping, rolling contacts, etc.). We also propose how to determine the theoretical minimum force sensor set for full body estimation, and discuss the practical limitations of doing so.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
On-line learning and modulation of periodic movements with nonlinear dynamical systems

Gams, A., Ijspeert, A., Schaal, S., Lenarčič, J.

Autonomous Robots, 27(1):3-23, 2009, clmc (article)

Abstract
Abstract  The paper presents a two-layered system for (1) learning and encoding a periodic signal without any knowledge on its frequency and waveform, and (2) modulating the learned periodic trajectory in response to external events. The system is used to learn periodic tasks on a humanoid HOAP-2 robot. The first layer of the system is a dynamical system responsible for extracting the fundamental frequency of the input signal, based on adaptive frequency oscillators. The second layer is a dynamical system responsible for learning of the waveform based on a built-in learning algorithm. By combining the two dynamical systems into one system we can rapidly teach new trajectories to robots without any knowledge of the frequency of the demonstration signal. The system extracts and learns only one period of the demonstration signal. Furthermore, the trajectories are robust to perturbations and can be modulated to cope with a dynamic environment. The system is computationally inexpensive, works on-line for any periodic signal, requires no additional signal processing to determine the frequency of the input signal and can be applied in parallel to multiple dimensions. Additionally, it can adapt to changes in frequency and shape, e.g. to non-stationary signals, such as hand-generated signals and human demonstrations.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


no image
Reversible dry micro-fibrillar adhesives with thermally controllable adhesion

Kim, S., Sitti, M., Xie, T., Xiao, X.

Soft Matter, 5(19):3689-3693, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Biologically Inspired Polymer Microfibrillar Arrays for Mask Sealing

Cheung, E., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIV PITTSBURGH PA, 2009 (techreport)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Tankbot: A miniature, peeling based climber on rough and smooth surfaces

Unver, O., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 2282-2287, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Automated 2-D nanoparticle manipulation with an atomic force microscope

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 1814-1819, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Enhanced reversible adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide-coated elastomer microfibrillar structures under wet conditions

Glass, P., Chung, H., Washburn, N. R., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6607-6612, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


no image
Microparticle manipulation using multiple untethered magnetic micro-robots on an electrostatic surface

Floyd, S., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 528-533, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Carbon Materials

Hirscher, M.

In Encyclopedia of Electrochemical Power Sources, pages: 484-487, Elsevier, Amsterdam [et al.], 2009 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Theorie der elektronischen Zustände in oxidischen magnetischen Materialien

Kostoglou, C.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2009 (phdthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Magnetooptische Untersuchungen an Ferromagnet- und Supraleiter-Nanosystemen und deren Hybriden

Treiber, S.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2009 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Superconducting phase formation in random neck syntheses: a study of the Y-Ba-Cu-O system by magneto-optics and magnetometry

Willems, J. B., Albrecht, J., Landau, I. L., Hulliger, J.

{Superconductor Science and Technology}, 22, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Determination of spin moments from magnetic EXAFS

Popescu, V., Gü\ssmann, M., Fähnle, M., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Linewidth of ferromagnetic resonance for systems with anisotropic damping

Seib, J., Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Structural and magnetic deconvolution of FePt/FeOx-nanoparticles using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

Nolle, D., Goering, E., Tietze, T., Schütz, G., Figuerola, A., Manna, L.

{New Journal of Physics}, 11, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Magnetic imaging with femtosecond temporal resolution

Li, J., Lee, M.-S., He, W., Redeker, B., Remhof, A., Amaladass, E., Hassel, C., Eimüller, T.

{Review of Scientific Instruments}, 80(7), 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Elliott-Yafet mechanism and the discussion of femtosecond magnetization dynamics

Steiauf, D., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 79, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Investigation of the stability of Mn12 single molecule magnets

Voss, S., Fonin, M., Burova, L., Burgert, M., Dedkov, Y. S., Preobrajenski, A. B., Goering, E., Groth, U., Kaul, A. R., Ruediger, U.

{Applied Physics A}, 94(3):491-495, 2009 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

1998


no image
Programmable pattern generators

Schaal, S., Sternad, D.

In 3rd International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Neuroscience, pages: 48-51, Research Triangle Park, NC, Oct. 24-28, October 1998, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper explores the idea to create complex human-like arm movements from movement primitives based on nonlinear attractor dynamics. Each degree-of-freedom of an arm is assumed to have two independent abilities to create movement, one through a discrete dynamic system, and one through a rhythmic system. The discrete system creates point-to-point movements based on internal or external target specifications. The rhythmic system can add an additional oscillatory movement relative to the current position of the discrete system. In the present study, we develop appropriate dynamic systems that can realize the above model, motivate the particular choice of the systems from a biological and engineering point of view, and present simulation results of the performance of such movement primitives. Implementation results on a Sarcos Dexterous Arm are discussed.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

1998


link (url) [BibTex]


no image
SVMs — a practical consequence of learning theory

Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Intelligent Systems and their Applications, 13(4):18-21, July 1998 (article)

Abstract
My first exposure to Support Vector Machines came this spring when heard Sue Dumais present impressive results on text categorization using this analysis technique. This issue's collection of essays should help familiarize our readers with this interesting new racehorse in the Machine Learning stable. Bernhard Scholkopf, in an introductory overview, points out that a particular advantage of SVMs over other learning algorithms is that it can be analyzed theoretically using concepts from computational learning theory, and at the same time can achieve good performance when applied to real problems. Examples of these real-world applications are provided by Sue Dumais, who describes the aforementioned text-categorization problem, yielding the best results to date on the Reuters collection, and Edgar Osuna, who presents strong results on application to face detection. Our fourth author, John Platt, gives us a practical guide and a new technique for implementing the algorithm efficiently.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Prior knowledge in support vector kernels

Schölkopf, B., Simard, P., Smola, A., Vapnik, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10, pages: 640-646 , (Editors: M Jordan and M Kearns and S Solla ), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Eleventh Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing (NIPS), June 1998 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
From regularization operators to support vector kernels

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10, pages: 343-349, (Editors: M Jordan and M Kearns and S Solla), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 11th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing (NIPS), June 1998 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Learning view graphs for robot navigation

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H.

Autonomous Robots, 5(1):111-125, March 1998 (article)

Abstract
We present a purely vision-based scheme for learning a topological representation of an open environment. The system represents selected places by local views of the surrounding scene, and finds traversable paths between them. The set of recorded views and their connections are combined into a graph model of the environment. To navigate between views connected in the graph, we employ a homing strategy inspired by findings of insect ethology. In robot experiments, we demonstrate that complex visual exploration and navigation tasks can thus be performed without using metric information.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl toc image
Surface second-order nonlinear optical activity

Fischer, P., Buckingham, A.

JOURNAL OF THE OPTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA B-OPTICAL PHYSICS, 15(12):2951-2957, 1998 (article)

Abstract
Following the recent observation of a large second-harmonic intensity difference from a monolayer of chiral molecules with left and right circularly polarized light, the scattering theory is generalized and extended to predict linear and circular intensity differences for the more Versatile sum-frequency spectroscopy. Estimates indicate that intensity differences should be detectable for a typical experimental arrangement. The second-order nonlinear surface susceptibility tensor is given for different surface point groups in the electric dipole approximation; it is shown that nonlinear optical activity phenomena unambiguously probe molecular chirality only for molecular monolayers that are symmetric about the normal. Other surface symmetries can give rise to intensity differences from monolayers composed of achiral molecules. A water surface is predicted to show Linear and nonlinear optical activity in the presence of an electric field parallel to the surface. (C) 1998 Optical Society of America {[}S0740-3224(98)01311-3] OCIS codes: 190.0190, 190.4350, 240.6490.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl toc image
Linear electro-optic effect in optically active liquids

Buckingham, A., Fischer, P.

CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS, 297(3-4):239-246, 1998 (article)

Abstract
A linear effect of an electrostatic field F on the intensity of sum- and difference-frequency generation in a chiral liquid is predicted. It arises in the electric dipole approximation. The effect changes sign with the enantiomer and on reversing the direction of the electrostatic field. The sum-frequency generator chi(alpha beta gamma)((2)) (-omega(3);omega(1),omega(2)), where omega(3) = omega(1) + omega(2), and the electric field-induced sum-frequency generator chi(alpha beta gamma delta)((3))(-omega(3);omega(1),omega(2),0)F-delta interfere and their contributions to the scattering power can be distinguished. Encouraging predictions are given for a typical experimental arrangement. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl toc image
Monolayers of hexadecyltrimethylammonium p-tosylate at the air-water interface. 1. Sum-frequency spectroscopy

Bell, G., Li, Z., Bain, C., Fischer, P., Duffy, D.

JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 102(47):9461-9472, 1998 (article)

Abstract
Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure of monolayers of the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium p-tosylate (C(16)TA(+)Ts(-)), at the surface of water. Selective deuteration of the cation or the anion allowed the separate detection of sum-frequency spectra of the surfactant and of counterions that are bound to the monolayer. The p-tosylate ions an oriented with their methyl groups pointing away from the aqueous subphase and with the C-2 axis tilted, on average, by 30-40 degrees from the surface normal. The vibrational spectra of C(16)TA(+) indicate that the number of gauche defects in the monolayer does not change dramatically when bromide counterions are replaced by p-tosylate. The ends of the hydrocarbon chains of C16TA+ are, however, tilted much further from the surface normal in the presence of p-tosylate than in the presence of bromide. A quantitative analysis of the sum-frequency spectra requires a knowledge of the molecular hyperpolarizability tensor: the role of ab initio calculations and Raman spectroscopy in determining the components of this tensor is discussed.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl toc image
Ultraviolet resonance Raman study of drug binding in dihydrofolate reductase, gyrase, and catechol O-methyltransferase

Couling, V., Fischer, P., Klenerman, D., Huber, W.

BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 75(2):1097-1106, 1998 (article)

Abstract
This paper presents a study of the use of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic methods as a means of elucidating aspects of drug-protein interactions. Some of the RR vibrational bands of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine and tryptophan are sensitive to the microenvironment, and the use of UV excitation radiation allows selective enhancement of the spectral features of the aromatic amino acids, enabling observation specifically of their change in microenvironment upon drug binding. The three drug-protein systems investigated in this study are dihydrofolate reductase with its inhibitor trimethoprim, gyrase with novobiocin, and catechol O-methyltransferase with dinitrocatechol. It is demonstrated that UVRR spectroscopy has adequate sensitivity to be a useful means of detecting drug-protein interactions in those systems for which the electronic absorption of the aromatic amino acids changes because of hydrogen bonding and/or possible dipole-dipole and dipole-polarizability interactions with the ligand.

pf

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Tele-nanorobotics using an atomic force microscope as a nanorobot and sensor

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

Advanced Robotics, 13(4):417-436, Taylor & Francis, 1998 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Robust local learning in high dimensional spaces

Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In 5th Joint Symposium on Neural Computation, pages: 186-193, Institute for Neural Computation, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, 1998, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Incremental learning of sensorimotor transformations in high dimensional spaces is one of the basic prerequisites for the success of autonomous robot devices as well as biological movement systems. So far, due to sparsity of data in high dimensional spaces, learning in such settings requires a significant amount of prior knowledge about the learning task, usually provided by a human expert. In this paper, we suggest a partial revision of this view. Based on empirical studies, we observed that, despite being globally high dimensional and sparse, data distributions from physical movement systems are locally low dimensional and dense. Under this assumption, we derive a learning algorithm, Locally Adaptive Subspace Regression, that exploits this property by combining a dynamically growing local dimensionality reduction technique as a preprocessing step with a nonparametric learning technique, locally weighted regression, that also learns the region of validity of the regression. The usefulness of the algorithm and the validity of its assumptions are illustrated for a synthetic data set, and for data of the inverse dynamics of human arm movements and an actual 7 degree-of-freedom anthropomorphic robot arm.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]