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2009


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Modelling the interplay of central pattern generation and sensory feedback in the neuromuscular control of running

Daley, M., Righetti, L., Ijspeert, A.

In Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology. Annual Main Meeting for the Society for Experimental Biology, 153, Glasgow, Scotland, 2009 (inproceedings)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2009


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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A novel artificial hair receptor based on aligned PVDF micro/nano fibers

Weiting, Liu, Bilsay, Sumer, Cesare, Stefanini, Arianna, Menciassi, Fei, Li, Dajing, Chen, Paolo, Dario, Metin, Sitti, Xin, Fu

In Robotics and Biomimetics, 2008. ROBIO 2008. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 49-54, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Waalbot: Agile climbing with synthetic fibrillar dry adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 1599-1600, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Compact models of motor primitive variations for predictible reaching and obstacle avoidance

Stulp, F., Oztop, E., Pastor, P., Beetz, M., Schaal, S.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2009), Paris, Dec.7-10, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
over and over again. This regularity allows humans and robots to reuse existing solutions for known recurring tasks. We expect that reusing a set of standard solutions to solve similar tasks will facilitate the design and on-line adaptation of the control systems of robots operating in human environments. In this paper, we derive a set of standard solutions for reaching behavior from human motion data. We also derive stereotypical reaching trajectories for variations of the task, in which obstacles are present. These stereotypical trajectories are then compactly represented with Dynamic Movement Primitives. On the humanoid robot Sarcos CB, this approach leads to reproducible, predictable, and human-like reaching motions.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Human optimization strategies under reward feedback

Hoffmann, H., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2009), Waikoloa, Hawaii, 2009, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Many hypothesis on human movement generation have been cast into an optimization framework, implying that movements are adapted to optimize a single quantity, like, e.g., jerk, end-point variance, or control cost. However, we still do not understand how humans actually learn when given only a cost or reward feedback at the end of a movement. Such a reinforcement learning setting has been extensively explored theoretically in engineering and computer science, but in human movement control, hardly any experiment studied movement learning under reward feedback. We present experiments probing which computational strategies humans use to optimize a movement under a continuous reward function. We present two experimental paradigms. The first paradigm mimics a ball-hitting task. Subjects (n=12) sat in front of a computer screen and moved a stylus on a tablet towards an unknown target. This target was located on a line that the subjects had to cross. During the movement, visual feedback was suppressed. After the movement, a reward was displayed graphically as a colored bar. As reward, we used a Gaussian function of the distance between the target location and the point of line crossing. We chose such a function since in sensorimotor tasks, the cost or loss function that humans seem to represent is close to an inverted Gaussian function (Koerding and Wolpert 2004). The second paradigm mimics pocket billiards. On the same experimental setup as above, the computer screen displayed a pocket (two bars), a white disk, and a green disk. The goal was to hit with the white disk the green disk (as in a billiard collision), such that the green disk moved into the pocket. Subjects (n=8) manipulated with the stylus the white disk to effectively choose start point and movement direction. Reward feedback was implicitly given as hitting or missing the pocket with the green disk. In both paradigms, subjects increased the average reward over trials. The surprising result was that in these experiments, humans seem to prefer a strategy that uses a reward-weighted average over previous movements instead of gradient ascent. The literature on reinforcement learning is dominated by gradient-ascent methods. However, our computer simulations and theoretical analysis revealed that reward-weighted averaging is the more robust choice given the amount of movement variance observed in humans. Apparently, humans choose an optimization strategy that is suitable for their own movement variance.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The SL simulation and real-time control software package

Schaal, S.

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2009, clmc (techreport)

Abstract
SL was originally developed as a Simulation Laboratory software package to allow creating complex rigid-body dynamics simulations with minimal development times. It was meant to complement a real-time robotics setup such that robot programs could first be debugged in simulation before trying them on the actual robot. For this purpose, the motor control setup of SL was copied from our experience with real-time robot setups with vxWorks (Windriver Systems, Inc.)Ñindeed, more than 90% of the code is identical to the actual robot software, as will be explained later in detail. As a result, SL is divided into three software components: 1) the generic code that is shared by the actual robot and the simulation, 2) the robot specific code, and 3) the simulation specific code. The robot specific code is tailored to the robotic environments that we have experienced over the years, in particular towards VME-based multi-processor real-time operating systems. The simulation specific code has all the components for OpenGL graphics simulations and mimics the robot multi-processor environment in simple C-code. Importantly, SL can be used stand-alone for creating graphics an-imationsÑthe heritage from real-time robotics does not restrict the complexity of possible simulations. This technical report describes SL in detail and can serve as a manual for new users of SL.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Piezoelectric ultrasonic resonant micromotor with a volume of less than 1 mm 3 for use in medical microbots

Watson, B., Friend, J., Yeo, L., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 2225-2230, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dynamic modeling and analysis of pitch motion of a basilisk lizard inspired quadruped robot running on water

Park, H. S., Floyd, S., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 2655-2660, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The SL simulation and real-time control software package

Schaal, S.

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2009, clmc (techreport)

Abstract
SL was originally developed as a Simulation Laboratory software package to allow creating complex rigid-body dynamics simulations with minimal development times. It was meant to complement a real-time robotics setup such that robot programs could first be debugged in simulation before trying them on the actual robot. For this purpose, the motor control setup of SL was copied from our experience with real-time robot setups with vxWorks (Windriver Systems, Inc.)â??indeed, more than 90% of the code is identical to the actual robot software, as will be explained later in detail. As a result, SL is divided into three software components: 1) the generic code that is shared by the actual robot and the simulation, 2) the robot specific code, and 3) the simulation specific code. The robot specific code is tailored to the robotic environments that we have experienced over the years, in particular towards VME-based multi-processor real-time operating systems. The simulation specific code has all the components for OpenGL graphics simulations and mimics the robot multi-processor environment in simple C-code. Importantly, SL can be used stand-alone for creating graphics an-imationsâ??the heritage from real-time robotics does not restrict the complexity of possible simulations. This technical report describes SL in detail and can serve as a manual for new users of SL.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning and generalization of motor skills by learning from demonstration

Pastor, P., Hoffmann, H., Asfour, T., Schaal, S.

In International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2009), Kobe, Japan, May 12-19, 2009, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We provide a general approach for learning robotic motor skills from human demonstration. To represent an observed movement, a non-linear differential equation is learned such that it reproduces this movement. Based on this representation, we build a library of movements by labeling each recorded movement according to task and context (e.g., grasping, placing, and releasing). Our differential equation is formulated such that generalization can be achieved simply by adapting a start and a goal parameter in the equation to the desired position values of a movement. For object manipulation, we present how our framework extends to the control of gripper orientation and finger position. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated in simulation as well as on a real robot. The robot learned a pick-and-place operation and a water-serving task and could generalize these tasks to novel situations.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Compliant quadruped locomotion over rough terrain

Buchli, J., Kalakrishnan, M., Mistry, M., Pastor, P., Schaal, S.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 814-820, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Many critical elements for statically stable walking for legged robots have been known for a long time, including stability criteria based on support polygons, good foothold selection, recovery strategies to name a few. All these criteria have to be accounted for in the planning as well as the control phase. Most legged robots usually employ high gain position control, which means that it is crucially important that the planned reference trajectories are a good match for the actual terrain, and that tracking is accurate. Such an approach leads to conservative controllers, i.e. relatively low speed, ground speed matching, etc. Not surprisingly such controllers are not very robust - they are not suited for the real world use outside of the laboratory where the knowledge of the world is limited and error prone. Thus, to achieve robust robotic locomotion in the archetypical domain of legged systems, namely complex rough terrain, where the size of the obstacles are in the order of leg length, additional elements are required. A possible solution to improve the robustness of legged locomotion is to maximize the compliance of the controller. While compliance is trivially achieved by reduced feedback gains, for terrain requiring precise foot placement (e.g. climbing rocks, walking over pegs or cracks) compliance cannot be introduced at the cost of inferior tracking. Thus, model-based control and - in contrast to passive dynamic walkers - active balance control is required. To achieve these objectives, in this paper we add two crucial elements to legged locomotion, i.e., floating-base inverse dynamics control and predictive force control, and we show that these elements increase robustness in face of unknown and unanticipated perturbations (e.g. obstacles). Furthermore, we introduce a novel line-based COG trajectory planner, which yields a simpler algorithm than traditional polygon based methods and creates the appropriate input to our control system.We show results from bot- h simulation and real world of a robotic dog walking over non-perceived obstacles and rocky terrain. The results prove the effectivity of the inverse dynamics/force controller. The presented results show that we have all elements needed for robust all-terrain locomotion, which should also generalize to other legged systems, e.g., humanoid robots.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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A miniature ceiling walking robot with flat tacky elastomeric footpads

Unver, O., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 2276-2281, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Inertial parameter estimation of floating-base humanoid systems using partial force sensing

Mistry, M., Schaal, S., Yamane, K.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2009), Paris, Dec.7-10, 2009, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, several controllers have been proposed for humanoid robots which rely on full-body dynamic models. The estimation of inertial parameters from data is a critical component for obtaining accurate models for control. However, floating base systems, such as humanoid robots, incur added challenges to this task (e.g. contact forces must be measured, contact states can change, etc.) In this work, we outline a theoretical framework for whole body inertial parameter estimation, including the unactuated floating base. Using a least squares minimization approach, conducted within the nullspace of unmeasured degrees of freedom, we are able to use a partial force sensor set for full-body estimation, e.g. using only joint torque sensors, allowing for estimation when contact force measurement is unavailable or unreliable (e.g. due to slipping, rolling contacts, etc.). We also propose how to determine the theoretical minimum force sensor set for full body estimation, and discuss the practical limitations of doing so.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Biologically Inspired Polymer Microfibrillar Arrays for Mask Sealing

Cheung, E., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIV PITTSBURGH PA, 2009 (techreport)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Tankbot: A miniature, peeling based climber on rough and smooth surfaces

Unver, O., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 2282-2287, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Automated 2-D nanoparticle manipulation with an atomic force microscope

Onal, C. D., Ozcan, O., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2009. ICRA’09. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 1814-1819, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microparticle manipulation using multiple untethered magnetic micro-robots on an electrostatic surface

Floyd, S., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 528-533, 2009 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2004


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Attentional Modulation of Auditory Event-Related Potentials in a Brain-Computer Interface

Hill, J., Lal, T., Bierig, K., Birbaumer, N., Schölkopf, B.

In BioCAS04, (S3/5/INV- S3/17-20):4, IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2004 IEEE International Workshop on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, December 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Motivated by the particular problems involved in communicating with "locked-in" paralysed patients, we aim to develop a brain-computer interface that uses auditory stimuli. We describe a paradigm that allows a user to make a binary decision by focusing attention on one of two concurrent auditory stimulus sequences. Using Support Vector Machine classification and Recursive Channel Elimination on the independent components of averaged event-related potentials, we show that an untrained user‘s EEG data can be classified with an encouragingly high level of accuracy. This suggests that it is possible for users to modulate EEG signals in a single trial by the conscious direction of attention, well enough to be useful in BCI.

ei

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

2004


PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Joint Kernel Maps

Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Bousquet, O., Mann, .., Noble, W.

(131), Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, November 2004 (techreport)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Modelling Spikes with Mixtures of Factor Analysers

Görür, D., Rasmussen, C., Tolias, A., Sinz, F., Logothetis, N.

In Pattern Recognition, pages: 391-398, LNCS 3175, (Editors: Rasmussen, C. E. , H.H. Bülthoff, B. Schölkopf, M.A. Giese), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 26th DAGM Symposium, September 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Identifying the action potentials of individual neurons from extracellular recordings, known as spike sorting, is a challenging problem. We consider the spike sorting problem using a generative model,mixtures of factor analysers, which concurrently performs clustering and feature extraction. The most important advantage of this method is that it quantifies the certainty with which the spikes are classified. This can be used as a means for evaluating the quality of clustering and therefore spike isolation. Using this method, nearly simultaneously occurring spikes can also be modelled which is a hard task for many of the spike sorting methods. Furthermore, modelling the data with a generative model allows us to generate simulated data.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Learning Depth From Stereo

Sinz, F., Candela, J., BakIr, G., Rasmussen, C., Franz, M.

In 26th DAGM Symposium, pages: 245-252, LNCS 3175, (Editors: Rasmussen, C. E., H. H. Bülthoff, B. Schölkopf, M. A. Giese), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 26th DAGM Symposium, September 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We compare two approaches to the problem of estimating the depth of a point in space from observing its image position in two different cameras: 1.~The classical photogrammetric approach explicitly models the two cameras and estimates their intrinsic and extrinsic parameters using a tedious calibration procedure; 2.~A generic machine learning approach where the mapping from image to spatial coordinates is directly approximated by a Gaussian Process regression. Our results show that the generic learning approach, in addition to simplifying the procedure of calibration, can lead to higher depth accuracies than classical calibration although no specific domain knowledge is used.

ei

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Advanced Lectures on Machine Learning

Bousquet, O., von Luxburg, U., Rätsch, G.

ML Summer Schools 2003, LNAI 3176, pages: 240, Springer, Berlin, Germany, ML Summer Schools, September 2004 (proceedings)

Abstract
Machine Learning has become a key enabling technology for many engineering applications, investigating scientific questions and theoretical problems alike. To stimulate discussions and to disseminate new results, a summer school series was started in February 2002, the documentation of which is published as LNAI 2600. This book presents revised lectures of two subsequent summer schools held in 2003 in Canberra, Australia, and in T{\"u}bingen, Germany. The tutorial lectures included are devoted to statistical learning theory, unsupervised learning, Bayesian inference, and applications in pattern recognition; they provide in-depth overviews of exciting new developments and contain a large number of references. Graduate students, lecturers, researchers and professionals alike will find this book a useful resource in learning and teaching machine learning.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Pattern Recognition: 26th DAGM Symposium, LNCS, Vol. 3175

Rasmussen, C., Bülthoff, H., Giese, M., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the 26th Pattern Recognition Symposium (DAGM‘04), pages: 581, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 26th Pattern Recognition Symposium, August 2004 (proceedings)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Semi-Supervised Induction

Yu, K., Tresp, V., Zhou, D.

(141), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tuebingen, Germany, August 2004 (techreport)

Abstract
Considerable progress was recently achieved on semi-supervised learning, which differs from the traditional supervised learning by additionally exploring the information of the unlabelled examples. However, a disadvantage of many existing methods is that it does not generalize to unseen inputs. This paper investigates learning methods that effectively make use of both labelled and unlabelled data to build predictive functions, which are defined on not just the seen inputs but the whole space. As a nice property, the proposed method allows effcient training and can easily handle new test points. We validate the method based on both toy data and real world data sets.

ei

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Learning to Find Graph Pre-Images

BakIr, G., Zien, A., Tsuda, K.

In Pattern Recognition, pages: 253-261, (Editors: Rasmussen, C. E., H. H. Bülthoff, B. Schölkopf, M. A. Giese), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 26th DAGM Symposium, August 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The recent development of graph kernel functions has made it possible to apply well-established machine learning methods to graphs. However, to allow for analyses that yield a graph as a result, it is necessary to solve the so-called pre-image problem: to reconstruct a graph from its feature space representation induced by the kernel. Here, we suggest a practical solution to this problem.

ei

PostScript PDF DOI [BibTex]

PostScript PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Exponential Families for Conditional Random Fields

Altun, Y., Smola, A., Hofmann, T.

In Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI 2004), pages: 2-9, (Editors: Chickering, D.M. , J.Y. Halpern), Morgan Kaufmann, San Francisco, CA, USA, 20th Annual Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), July 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we define conditional random fields in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces and show connections to Gaussian Process classification. More specifically, we prove decomposition results for undirected graphical models and we give constructions for kernels. Finally we present efficient means of solving the optimization problem using reduced rank decompositions and we show how stationarity can be exploited efficiently in the optimization process.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Object categorization with SVM: kernels for local features

Eichhorn, J., Chapelle, O.

(137), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, July 2004 (techreport)

Abstract
In this paper, we propose to combine an efficient image representation based on local descriptors with a Support Vector Machine classifier in order to perform object categorization. For this purpose, we apply kernels defined on sets of vectors. After testing different combinations of kernel / local descriptors, we have been able to identify a very performant one.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Hilbertian Metrics and Positive Definite Kernels on Probability Measures

Hein, M., Bousquet, O.

(126), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, July 2004 (techreport)

Abstract
We investigate the problem of defining Hilbertian metrics resp. positive definite kernels on probability measures, continuing previous work. This type of kernels has shown very good results in text classification and has a wide range of possible applications. In this paper we extend the two-parameter family of Hilbertian metrics of Topsoe such that it now includes all commonly used Hilbertian metrics on probability measures. This allows us to do model selection among these metrics in an elegant and unified way. Second we investigate further our approach to incorporate similarity information of the probability space into the kernel. The analysis provides a better understanding of these kernels and gives in some cases a more efficient way to compute them. Finally we compare all proposed kernels in two text and one image classification problem.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Kernels, Associated Structures and Generalizations

Hein, M., Bousquet, O.

(127), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, July 2004 (techreport)

Abstract
This paper gives a survey of results in the mathematical literature on positive definite kernels and their associated structures. We concentrate on properties which seem potentially relevant for Machine Learning and try to clarify some results that have been misused in the literature. Moreover we consider different lines of generalizations of positive definite kernels. Namely we deal with operator-valued kernels and present the general framework of Hilbertian subspaces of Schwartz which we use to introduce kernels which are distributions. Finally indefinite kernels and their associated reproducing kernel spaces are considered.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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PAC-Bayesian Generic Chaining

Audibert, J., Bousquet, O.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 1125-1132 , (Editors: Thrun, S., L.K. Saul, B. Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
There exist many different generalization error bounds for classification. Each of these bounds contains an improvement over the others for certain situations. Our goal is to combine these different improvements into a single bound. In particular we combine the PAC-Bayes approach introduced by McAllester, which is interesting for averaging classifiers, with the optimal union bound provided by the generic chaining technique developed by Fernique and Talagrand. This combination is quite natural since the generic chaining is based on the notion of majorizing measures, which can be considered as priors on the set of classifiers, and such priors also arise in the PAC-bayesian setting.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Prediction on Spike Data Using Kernel Algorithms

Eichhorn, J., Tolias, A., Zien, A., Kuss, M., Rasmussen, C., Weston, J., Logothetis, N., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 1367-1374, (Editors: S Thrun and LK Saul and B Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 17th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We report and compare the performance of different learning algorithms based on data from cortical recordings. The task is to predict the orientation of visual stimuli from the activity of a population of simultaneously recorded neurons. We compare several ways of improving the coding of the input (i.e., the spike data) as well as of the output (i.e., the orientation), and report the results obtained using different kernel algorithms.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Warped Gaussian Processes

Snelson, E., Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 337-344, (Editors: Thrun, S., L.K. Saul, B. Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We generalise the Gaussian process (GP) framework for regression by learning a nonlinear transformation of the GP outputs. This allows for non-Gaussian processes and non-Gaussian noise. The learning algorithm chooses a nonlinear transformation such that transformed data is well-modelled by a GP. This can be seen as including a preprocessing transformation as an integral part of the probabilistic modelling problem, rather than as an ad-hoc step. We demonstrate on several real regression problems that learning the transformation can lead to significantly better performance than using a regular GP, or a GP with a fixed transformation.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Ranking on Data Manifolds

Zhou, D., Weston, J., Gretton, A., Bousquet, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 16, pages: 169-176, (Editors: S Thrun and L Saul and B Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 17th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Google search engine has enjoyed a huge success with its web page ranking algorithm, which exploits global, rather than local, hyperlink structure of the web using random walks. Here we propose a simple universal ranking algorithm for data lying in the Euclidean space, such as text or image data. The core idea of our method is to rank the data with respect to the intrinsic manifold structure collectively revealed by a great amount of data. Encouraging experimental results from synthetic, image, and text data illustrate the validity of our method.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Gaussian Processes in Reinforcement Learning

Rasmussen, C., Kuss, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 751-759, (Editors: Thrun, S., L. K. Saul, B. Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We exploit some useful properties of Gaussian process (GP) regression models for reinforcement learning in continuous state spaces and discrete time. We demonstrate how the GP model allows evaluation of the value function in closed form. The resulting policy iteration algorithm is demonstrated on a simple problem with a two dimensional state space. Further, we speculate that the intrinsic ability of GP models to characterise distributions of functions would allow the method to capture entire distributions over future values instead of merely their expectation, which has traditionally been the focus of much of reinforcement learning.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Learning with Local and Global Consistency

Zhou, D., Bousquet, O., Lal, T., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 321-328, (Editors: S Thrun and LK Saul and B Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 17th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider the general problem of learning from labeled and unlabeled data, which is often called semi-supervised learning or transductive inference. A principled approach to semi-supervised learning is to design a classifying function which is sufficiently smooth with respect to the intrinsic structure collectively revealed by known labeled and unlabeled points. We present a simple algorithm to obtain such a smooth solution. Our method yields encouraging experimental results on a number of classification problems and demonstrates effective use of unlabeled data.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16: Proceedings of the 2003 Conference

Thrun, S., Saul, L., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS 2003), pages: 1621, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 17th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (proceedings)

Abstract
The annual Neural Information Processing (NIPS) conference is the flagship meeting on neural computation. It draws a diverse group of attendees—physicists, neuroscientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computer scientists. The presentations are interdisciplinary, with contributions in algorithms, learning theory, cognitive science, neuroscience, brain imaging, vision, speech and signal processing, reinforcement learning and control, emerging technologies, and applications. Only thirty percent of the papers submitted are accepted for presentation at NIPS, so the quality is exceptionally high. This volume contains all the papers presented at the 2003 conference.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Learning to Find Pre-Images

Bakir, G., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 449-456, (Editors: S Thrun and LK Saul and B Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 17th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider the problem of reconstructing patterns from a feature map. Learning algorithms using kernels to operate in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) express their solutions in terms of input points mapped into the RKHS. We introduce a technique based on kernel principal component analysis and regression to reconstruct corresponding patterns in the input space (aka pre-images) and review its performance in several applications requiring the construction of pre-images. The introduced technique avoids difficult and/or unstable numerical optimization, is easy to implement and, unlike previous methods, permits the computation of pre-images in discrete input spaces.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Measure Based Regularization

Bousquet, O., Chapelle, O., Hein, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 1221-1228, (Editors: Thrun, S., L. Saul, B. Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We address in this paper the question of how the knowledge of the marginal distribution $P(x)$ can be incorporated in a learning algorithm. We suggest three theoretical methods for taking into account this distribution for regularization and provide links to existing graph-based semi-supervised learning algorithms. We also propose practical implementations.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Insights from Machine Learning Applied to Human Visual Classification

Graf, A., Wichmann, F.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 905-912, (Editors: Thrun, S., L. Saul, B. Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We attempt to understand visual classification in humans using both psychophysical and machine learning techniques. Frontal views of human faces were used for a gender classification task. Human subjects classified the faces and their gender judgment, reaction time and confidence rating were recorded. Several hyperplane learning algorithms were used on the same classification task using the Principal Components of the texture and flowfield representation of the faces. The classification performance of the learning algorithms was estimated using the face database with the true gender of the faces as labels, and also with the gender estimated by the subjects. We then correlated the human responses to the distance of the stimuli to the separating hyperplane of the learning algorithms. Our results suggest that human classification can be modeled by some hyperplane algorithms in the feature space we used. For classification, the brain needs more processing for stimuli close to that hyperplane than for those further away.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Image Construction by Linear Programming

Tsuda, K., Rätsch, G.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 57-64, (Editors: Thrun, S., L.K. Saul, B. Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A common way of image denoising is to project a noisy image to the subspace of admissible images made for instance by PCA. However, a major drawback of this method is that all pixels are updated by the projection, even when only a few pixels are corrupted by noise or occlusion. We propose a new method to identify the noisy pixels by 1-norm penalization and update the identified pixels only. The identification and updating of noisy pixels are formulated as one linear program which can be solved efficiently. Especially, one can apply the ν-trick to directly specify the fraction of pixels to be reconstructed. Moreover, we extend the linear program to be able to exploit prior knowledge that occlusions often appear in contiguous blocks (e.g. sunglasses on faces). The basic idea is to penalize boundary points and interior points of the occluded area differently. We are able to show the ν-property also for this extended LP leading a method which is easy to use. Experimental results impressively demonstrate the power of our approach.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Semi-Supervised Protein Classification using Cluster Kernels

Weston, J., Leslie, C., Zhou, D., Elisseeff, A., Noble, W.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pages: 595-602, (Editors: Thrun, S., L.K. Saul, B. Schölkopf), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Seventeenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A key issue in supervised protein classification is the representation of input sequences of amino acids. Recent work using string kernels for protein data has achieved state-of-the-art classification performance. However, such representations are based only on labeled data --- examples with known 3D structures, organized into structural classes --- while in practice, unlabeled data is far more plentiful. In this work, we develop simple and scalable cluster kernel techniques for incorporating unlabeled data into the representation of protein sequences. We show that our methods greatly improve the classification performance of string kernels and outperform standard approaches for using unlabeled data, such as adding close homologs of the positive examples to the training data. We achieve equal or superior performance to previously presented cluster kernel methods while achieving far greater computational efficiency.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Hebbian Algorithm for single-frame super-resolution

Kim, K., Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Computer Vision - ECCV 2004, LNCS vol. 3024, pages: 135-149, (Editors: A Leonardis and H Bischof), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 8th European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV), May 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper presents a method for single-frame image super-resolution using an unsupervised learning technique. The required prior knowledge about the high-resolution images is obtained from Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA). The original form of KPCA, however, can be only applied to strongly restricted image classes due to the limited number of training examples that can be processed. We therefore propose a new iterative method for performing KPCA, the {em Kernel Hebbian Algorithm}. By kernelizing the Generalized Hebbian Algorithm, one can iteratively estimate the Kernel Principal Components with only linear order memory complexity. The resulting super-resolution algorithm shows a comparable performance to the existing supervised methods on images containing faces and natural scenes.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kamerakalibrierung und Tiefenschätzung: Ein Vergleich von klassischer Bündelblockausgleichung und statistischen Lernalgorithmen

Sinz, FH.

Wilhelm-Schickard-Institut für Informatik, Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, March 2004 (techreport)

Abstract
Die Arbeit verleicht zwei Herangehensweisen an das Problem der Sch{\"a}tzung der r{\"a}umliche Position eines Punktes aus den Bildkoordinaten in zwei verschiedenen Kameras. Die klassische Methode der B{\"u}ndelblockausgleichung modelliert zwei Einzelkameras und sch{\"a}tzt deren {\"a}ußere und innere Orientierung mit einer iterativen Kalibrationsmethode, deren Konvergenz sehr stark von guten Startwerten abh{\"a}ngt. Die Tiefensch{\"a}tzung eines Punkts geschieht durch die Invertierung von drei der insgesamt vier Projektionsgleichungen der Einzalkameramodelle. Die zweite Methode benutzt Kernel Ridge Regression und Support Vector Regression, um direkt eine Abbildung von den Bild- auf die Raumkoordinaten zu lernen. Die Resultate zeigen, daß der Ansatz mit maschinellem Lernen, neben einer erheblichen Vereinfachung des Kalibrationsprozesses, zu h{\"o}heren Positionsgenaugikeiten f{\"u}hren kann.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Unifying Colloborative and Content-Based Filtering.

Basilico, J., Hofmann, T.

In ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, pages: 65 , (Editors: Greiner, R. , D. Schuurmans), ACM Press, New York, USA, ICLM, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Collaborative and content-based filtering are two paradigms that have been applied in the context of recommender systems and user preference prediction. This paper proposes a novel, unified approach that systematically integrates all available training information such as past user-item ratings as well as attributes of items or users to learn a prediction function. The key ingredient of our method is the design of a suitable kernel or similarity function between user-item pairs that allows simultaneous generalization across the user and item dimensions. We propose an on-line algorithm (JRank) that generalizes perceptron learning. Experimental results on the EachMovie data set show significant improvements over standard approaches.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Clustering Protein Sequence and Structure Space with Infinite Gaussian Mixture Models

Dubey, A., Hwang, S., Rangel, C., Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z., Wild, DL.

In Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing 2004; Vol. 9, pages: 399-410, World Scientific Publishing, Singapore, Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe a novel approach to the problem of automatically clustering protein sequences and discovering protein families, subfamilies etc., based on the thoery of infinite Gaussian mixture models. This method allows the data itself to dictate how many mixture components are required to model it, and provides a measure of the probability that two proteins belong to the same cluster. We illustrate our methods with application to three data sets: globin sequences, globin sequences with known tree-dimensional structures and G-pretein coupled receptor sequences. The consistency of the clusters indicate that that our methods is producing biologically meaningful results, which provide a very good indication of the underlying families and subfamilies. With the inclusion of secondary structure and residue solvent accessibility information, we obtain a classification of sequences of known structure which reflects and extends their SCOP classifications. A supplementary web site containing larger versions of the figures is available at http://public.kgi.edu/~wild/PSB04

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Efficient Approximations for Support Vector Machines in Object Detection

Kienzle, W., BakIr, G., Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

In DAGM 2004, pages: 54-61, (Editors: CE Rasmussen and HH Bülthoff and B Schölkopf and MA Giese), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Pattern Recognition, Proceedings of the 26th DAGM Symposium, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a new approximation scheme for support vector decision functions in object detection. In the present approach we are building on an existing algorithm where the set of support vectors is replaced by a smaller so-called reduced set of synthetic points. Instead of finding the reduced set via unconstrained optimization, we impose a structural constraint on the synthetic vectors such that the resulting approximation can be evaluated via separable filters. Applications that require scanning an entire image can benefit from this representation: when using separable filters, the average computational complexity for evaluating a reduced set vector on a test patch of size (h x w) drops from O(hw) to O(h+w). We show experimental results on handwritten digits and face detection.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Kernel Methods for Manifold Estimation

Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings in Computational Statistics, pages: 441-452, (Editors: J Antoch), Physica-Verlag/Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, COMPSTAT, 2004 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Regularization Framework for Learningfrom Graph Data

Zhou, D., Schölkopf, B.

In ICML Workshop on Statistical Relational Learning and Its Connections to Other Fields, pages: 132-137, ICML, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The data in many real-world problems can be thought of as a graph, such as the web, co-author networks, and biological networks. We propose a general regularization framework on graphs, which is applicable to the classification, ranking, and link prediction problems. We also show that the method can be explained as lazy random walks. We evaluate the method on a number of experiments.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Multivariate Regression with Stiefel Constraints

Bakir, G., Gretton, A., Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

(128), MPI for Biological Cybernetics, Spemannstr 38, 72076, Tuebingen, 2004 (techreport)

Abstract
We introduce a new framework for regression between multi-dimensional spaces. Standard methods for solving this problem typically reduce the problem to one-dimensional regression by choosing features in the input and/or output spaces. These methods, which include PLS (partial least squares), KDE (kernel dependency estimation), and PCR (principal component regression), select features based on different a-priori judgments as to their relevance. Moreover, loss function and constraints are chosen not primarily on statistical grounds, but to simplify the resulting optimisation. By contrast, in our approach the feature construction and the regression estimation are performed jointly, directly minimizing a loss function that we specify, subject to a rank constraint. A major advantage of this approach is that the loss is no longer chosen according to the algorithmic requirements, but can be tailored to the characteristics of the task at hand; the features will then be optimal with respect to this objective. Our approach also allows for the possibility of using a regularizer in the optimization. Finally, by processing the observations sequentially, our algorithm is able to work on large scale problems.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A kernel view of the dimensionality reduction of manifolds

Ham, J., Lee, D., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the Twenty-First International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 369-376, (Editors: CE Brodley), ACM, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2004, also appeared as MPI-TR 110 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We interpret several well-known algorithms for dimensionality reduction of manifolds as kernel methods. Isomap, graph Laplacian eigenmap, and locally linear embedding (LLE) all utilize local neighborhood information to construct a global embedding of the manifold. We show how all three algorithms can be described as kernel PCA on specially constructed Gram matrices, and illustrate the similarities and differences between the algorithms with representative examples.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]