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1999


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Is the Hippocampus a Kalman Filter?

Bousquet, O., Balakrishnan, K., Honavar, V.

In Proceedings of the Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing, 3, pages: 619-630, Proceedings of the Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing, 1999 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

1999


[BibTex]


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A Comparison of Artificial Neural Networks and Cluster Analysis for Typing Biometrics Authentication

Maisuria, K., Ong, CS., Lai, .

In unknown, pages: 9999-9999, International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, 1999 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Implications of the pedestal effect for models of contrast-processing and gain-control

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

OSA Conference Program, pages: 62, 1999 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast processing is essential for understanding spatial vision. Pedestal contrast systematically affects slopes of functions relating 2-AFC contrast discrimination performance to pedestal contrast. The slopes provide crucial information because only full sets of data allow discrimination among contrast-processing and gain-control models. Issues surrounding Weber's law will also be discussed.

ei

[BibTex]


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Entropy numbers, operators and support vector kernels.

Williamson, R., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning, pages: 127-144, (Editors: B Schölkopf and CJC Burges and AJ Smola), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Smola, A.

MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (book)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Fisher discriminant analysis with kernels

Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

In Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Signal Processing Society Workshop, 9, pages: 41-48, (Editors: Y-H Hu and J Larsen and E Wilson and S Douglas), IEEE, Neural Networks for Signal Processing IX, 1999 (inproceedings)

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Artscience Sciencart

Black, M. J., Levy, D., PamelaZ,

In Art and Innovation: The Xerox PARC Artist-in-Residence Program, pages: 244-300, (Editors: Harris, C.), MIT-Press, 1999 (incollection)

Abstract
One of the effects of the PARC Artist In Residence (PAIR) program has been to expose the strong connections between scientists and artists. Both do what they do because they need to do it. They are often called upon to justify their work in order to be allowed to continue to do it. They need to justify it to funders, to sponsoring institutions, corporations, the government, the public. They publish papers, teach workshops, and write grants touting the educational or health benefits of what they do. All of these things are to some extent valid, but the fact of the matter is: artists and scientists do their work because they are driven to do it. They need to explore and create.

This chapter attempts to give a flavor of one multi-way "PAIRing" between performance artist PamelaZ and two PARC researchers, Michael Black and David Levy. The three of us paired up because we found each other interesting. We chose each other. While most artists in the program are paired with a single researcher Pamela jokingly calls herself a bigamist for choosing two PAIR "husbands" with different backgrounds and interests.

There are no "rules" to the PAIR program; no one told us what to do with our time. Despite this we all had a sense that we needed to produce something tangible during Pamela's year-long residency. In fact, Pamela kept extending her residency because she did not feel as though we had actually made anything concrete. The interesting thing was that all along we were having great conversations, some of which Pamela recorded. What we did not see at the time was that it was these conversations between artists and scientists that are at the heart of the PAIR program and that these conversations were changing the way we thought about our own work and the relationships between science and art.

To give these conversations their due, and to allow the reader into our PAIR interactions, we include two of our many conversations in this chapter.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Tele-touch feedback of surfaces at the micro/nano scale: Modeling and experiments

Sitti, M., Horighuchi, S., Hashimoto, H.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 1999. IROS’99. Proceedings. 1999 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, 2, pages: 882-888, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Parameterized modeling and recognition of activities

Yacoob, Y., Black, M. J.

Computer Vision and Image Understanding, 73(2):232-247, 1999 (article)

Abstract
In this paper we consider a class of human activities—atomic activities—which can be represented as a set of measurements over a finite temporal window (e.g., the motion of human body parts during a walking cycle) and which has a relatively small space of variations in performance. A new approach for modeling and recognition of atomic activities that employs principal component analysis and analytical global transformations is proposed. The modeling of sets of exemplar instances of activities that are similar in duration and involve similar body part motions is achieved by parameterizing their representation using principal component analysis. The recognition of variants of modeled activities is achieved by searching the space of admissible parameterized transformations that these activities can undergo. This formulation iteratively refines the recognition of the class to which the observed activity belongs and the transformation parameters that relate it to the model in its class. We provide several experiments on recognition of articulated and deformable human motions from image motion parameters.

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pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]


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Challenge to micro/nanomanipulation using atomic force microscope

Hashimoto, H., Sitti, M.

In Micromechatronics and Human Science, 1999. MHS’99. Proceedings of 1999 International Symposium on, pages: 35-42, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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< 研究速報>(< 小特集> マイクロマシン)

Sitti, M., 橋本秀紀,

生産研究, 51(8):651-653, 東京大学, 1999 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Explaining optical flow events with parameterized spatio-temporal models

Black, M. J.

In IEEE Proc. Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR’99, pages: 326-332, IEEE, Fort Collins, CO, 1999 (inproceedings)

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pdf video [BibTex]

pdf video [BibTex]


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Visualization interface for AFM-based nano-manipulation

Horiguchi, S., Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

In Industrial Electronics, 1999. ISIE’99. Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on, 1, pages: 310-315, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Micro/Nano Manipulation Using Atomic Force Microscope.

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

生産研究, 51(8):651-653, 東京大学生産技術研究所, 1999 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Is imitation learning the route to humanoid robots?

Schaal, S.

Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 3(6):233-242, 1999, clmc (article)

Abstract
This review will focus on two recent developments in artificial intelligence and neural computation: learning from imitation and the development of humanoid robots. It will be postulated that the study of imitation learning offers a promising route to gain new insights into mechanisms of perceptual motor control that could ultimately lead to the creation of autonomous humanoid robots. This hope is justified because imitation learning channels research efforts towards three important issues: efficient motor learning, the connection between action and perception, and modular motor control in form of movement primitives. In order to make these points, first, a brief review of imitation learning will be given from the view of psychology and neuroscience. In these fields, representations and functional connections between action and perception have been explored that contribute to the understanding of motor acts of other beings. The recent discovery that some areas in the primate brain are active during both movement perception and execution provided a first idea of the possible neural basis of imitation. Secondly, computational approaches to imitation learning will be described, initially from the perspective of traditional AI and robotics, and then with a focus on neural network models and statistical learning research. Parallels and differences between biological and computational approaches to imitation will be highlighted. The review will end with an overview of current projects that actually employ imitation learning for humanoid robots.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Tele-nanorobotics 2-d manipulation of micro/nanoparticles using afm

Sitti, M., Horiguchi, S., Hashimoto, H.

In Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, 1999. Proceedings. 1999 IEEE/ASME International Conference on, pages: 786-786, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Virtual Reality-Based Teleoperation in the Micro/Nano World.

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

生産研究, 51(8):654-656, 東京大学生産技術研究所, 1999 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Nonparametric regression for learning nonlinear transformations

Schaal, S.

In Prerational Intelligence in Strategies, High-Level Processes and Collective Behavior, 2, pages: 595-621, (Editors: Ritter, H.;Cruse, H.;Dean, J.), Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
Information processing in animals and artificial movement systems consists of a series of transformations that map sensory signals to intermediate representations, and finally to motor commands. Given the physical and neuroanatomical differences between individuals and the need for plasticity during development, it is highly likely that such transformations are learned rather than pre-programmed by evolution. Such self-organizing processes, capable of discovering nonlinear dependencies between different groups of signals, are one essential part of prerational intelligence. While neural network algorithms seem to be the natural choice when searching for solutions for learning transformations, this paper will take a more careful look at which types of neural networks are actually suited for the requirements of an autonomous learning system. The approach that we will pursue is guided by recent developments in learning theory that have linked neural network learning to well established statistical theories. In particular, this new statistical understanding has given rise to the development of neural network systems that are directly based on statistical methods. One family of such methods stems from nonparametric regression. This paper will compare nonparametric learning with the more widely used parametric counterparts in a non technical fashion, and investigate how these two families differ in their properties and their applicabilities. We will argue that nonparametric neural networks offer a set of characteristics that make them a very promising candidate for on-line learning in autonomous system.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Segmentation of endpoint trajectories does not imply segmented control

Sternad, D., Schaal, D.

Experimental Brain Research, 124(1):118-136, 1999, clmc (article)

Abstract
While it is generally assumed that complex movements consist of a sequence of simpler units, the quest to define these units of action, or movement primitives, still remains an open question. In this context, two hypotheses of movement segmentation of endpoint trajectories in 3D human drawing movements are re-examined: (1) the stroke-based segmentation hypothesis based on the results that the proportionality coefficient of the 2/3 power law changes discontinuously with each new â??strokeâ?, and (2) the segmentation hypothesis inferred from the observation of piecewise planar endpoint trajectories of 3D drawing movements. In two experiments human subjects performed a set of elliptical and figure-8 patterns of different sizes and orientations using their whole arm in 3D. The kinematic characteristics of the endpoint trajectories and the seven joint angles of the arm were analyzed. While the endpoint trajectories produced similar segmentation features as reported in the literature, analyses of the joint angles show no obvious segmentation but rather continuous oscillatory patterns. By approximating the joint angle data of human subjects with sinusoidal trajectories, and by implementing this model on a 7-degree-of-freedom anthropomorphic robot arm, it is shown that such a continuous movement strategy can produce exactly the same features as observed by the above segmentation hypotheses. The origin of this apparent segmentation of endpoint trajectories is traced back to the nonlinear transformations of the forward kinematics of human arms. The presented results demonstrate that principles of discrete movement generation may not be reconciled with those of rhythmic movement as easily as has been previously suggested, while the generalization of nonlinear pattern generators to arm movements can offer an interesting alternative to approach the question of units of action.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Two-dimensional fine particle positioning using a piezoresistive cantilever as a micro/nano-manipulator

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

In Robotics and Automation, 1999. Proceedings. 1999 IEEE International Conference on, 4, pages: 2729-2735, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Teleoperated nano scale object manipulation

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

Recent Advances on Mechatronics, pages: 322-335, Singapore: Springer-Verlag, 1999 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robust estimation of multiple surface shapes from occluded textures

Black, M. J., Rosenholtz, R.

In International Symposium on Computer Vision, pages: 485-490, Miami, FL, November 1995 (inproceedings)

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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View-based cognitive map learning by an autonomous robot

Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H., Georg, P., Schölkopf, B., Yasuhara, K.

In Proceedings International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, vol. 2, pages: 381-386, (Editors: Fogelman-Soulié, F.), EC2, Paris, France, Conférence Internationale sur les Réseaux de Neurones Artificiels (ICANN '95), October 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper presents a view-based approach to map learning and navigation in mazes. By means of graph theory we have shown that the view-graph is a sufficient representation for map behaviour such as path planning. A neural network for unsupervised learning of the view-graph from sequences of views is constructed. We use a modified Kohonen (1988) learning rule that transforms temporal sequence (rather than featural similarity) into connectedness. In the main part of the paper, we present a robot implementation of the scheme. The results show that the proposed network is able to support map behaviour in simple environments.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Extracting support data for a given task

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Vapnik, V.

In First International Conference on Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining (KDD-95), pages: 252-257, (Editors: UM Fayyad and R Uthurusamy), AAAI Press, Menlo Park, CA, USA, August 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We report a novel possibility for extracting a small subset of a data base which contains all the information necessary to solve a given classification task: using the Support Vector Algorithm to train three different types of handwritten digit classifiers, we observed that these types of classifiers construct their decision surface from strongly overlapping small (k: 4%) subsets of the data base. This finding opens up the possibiiity of compressing data bases significantly by disposing of the data which is not important for the solution of a given task. In addition, we show that the theory allows us to predict the classifier that will have the best generalization ability, based solely on performance on the training set and characteristics of the learning machines. This finding is important for cases where the amount of available data is limited.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The PLAYBOT Project

Tsotsos, J. K., Dickinson, S., Jenkin, M., Milios, E., Jepson, A., Down, B., Amdur, E., Stevenson, S., Black, M., Metaxas, D., Cooperstock, J., Culhane, S., Nuflo, F., Verghese, G., Wai, W., Wilkes, D., Ye, Y.

In Proc. IJCAI Workshop on AI Applications for Disabled People, Montreal, August 1995 (inproceedings)

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abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]


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A kendama learning robot based on a dynamic optimization theory

Miyamoto, H., Gandolfo, F., Gomi, H., Schaal, S., Koike, Y., Osu, R., Nakano, E., Kawato, M.

In Preceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Communication (RO-MAN’95), pages: 327-332, Tokyo, July 1995, clmc (inproceedings)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Recognizing facial expressions under rigid and non-rigid facial motions using local parametric models of image motion

Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y.

In International Workshop on Automatic Face- and Gesture-Recognition, Zurich, July 1995 (inproceedings)

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video abstract [BibTex]

video abstract [BibTex]


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Image segmentation using robust mixture models

Black, M. J., Jepson, A. D.

US Pat. 5,802,203, June 1995 (patent)

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pdf on-line at USPTO [BibTex]

pdf on-line at USPTO [BibTex]


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Tracking and recognizing rigid and non-rigid facial motions using local parametric models of image motion

Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y.

In Fifth International Conf. on Computer Vision, ICCV’95, pages: 347-381, Boston, MA, June 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper explores the use of local parametrized models of image motion for recovering and recognizing the non-rigid and articulated motion of human faces. Parametric flow models (for example affine) are popular for estimating motion in rigid scenes. We observe that within local regions in space and time, such models not only accurately model non-rigid facial motions but also provide a concise description of the motion in terms of a small number of parameters. These parameters are intuitively related to the motion of facial features during facial expressions and we show how expressions such as anger, happiness, surprise, fear, disgust and sadness can be recognized from the local parametric motions in the presence of significant head motion. The motion tracking and expression recognition approach performs with high accuracy in extensive laboratory experiments involving 40 subjects as well as in television and movie sequences.

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pdf video publisher site [BibTex]

pdf video publisher site [BibTex]


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A computational model for shape from texture for multiple textures

Black, M. J., Rosenholtz, R.

Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science Supplement, Vol. 36, No. 4, pages: 2202, March 1995 (conference)

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abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]


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View-Based Cognitive Mapping and Path Planning

Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H.

Adaptive Behavior, 3(3):311-348, January 1995 (article)

Abstract
This article presents a scheme for learning a cognitive map of a maze from a sequence of views and movement decisions. The scheme is based on an intermediate representation called the view graph, whose nodes correspond to the views whereas the labeled edges represent the movements leading from one view to another. By means of a graph theoretical reconstruction method, the view graph is shown to carry complete information on the topological and directional structure of the maze. Path planning can be carried out directly in the view graph without actually performing this reconstruction. A neural network is presented that learns the view graph during a random exploration of the maze. It is based on an unsupervised competitive learning rule translating temporal sequence (rather than similarity) of views into connectedness in the network. The network uses its knowledge of the topological and directional structure of the maze to generate expectations about which views are likely to be encountered next, improving the view-recognition performance. Numerical simulations illustrate the network's ability for path planning and the recognition of views degraded by random noise. The results are compared to findings of behavioral neuroscience.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Suppression and creation of chaos in a periodically forced Lorenz system.

Franz, MO., Zhang, MH.

Physical Review, E 52, pages: 3558-3565, 1995 (article)

Abstract
Periodic forcing is introduced into the Lorenz model to study the effects of time-dependent forcing on the behavior of the system. Such a nonautonomous system stays dissipative and has a bounded attracting set which all trajectories finally enter. The possible kinds of attracting sets are restricted to periodic orbits and strange attractors. A large-scale survey of parameter space shows that periodic forcing has mainly three effects in the Lorenz system depending on the forcing frequency: (i) Fixed points are replaced by oscillations around them; (ii) resonant periodic orbits are created both in the stable and the chaotic region; (iii) chaos is created in the stable region near the resonance frequency and in periodic windows. A comparison to other studies shows that part of this behavior has been observed in simulations of higher truncations and real world experiments. Since very small modulations can already have a considerable effect, this suggests that periodic processes such as annual or diurnal cycles should not be omitted even in simple climate models.

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A New Method for Constructing Artificial Neural Networks

Vapnik, V., Burges, C., Schölkopf, B.

AT & T Bell Laboratories, 1995 (techreport)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Image segmentation from motion: just the loss of high-spatial-frequency content ?

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

Perception, 24, pages: S19, 1995 (poster)

Abstract
The human contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is bandpass for stimuli of low temporal frequency but, for moving stimuli, results in a low-pass CSF with large high spatial-frequency losses. Thus the high spatial-frequency content of images moving on the retina cannot be seen; motion perception could be facilitated by, or even be based on, the selective loss of high spatial-frequency content. 2-AFC image segmentation experiments were conducted with segmentation based on motion or on form. In the latter condition, the form difference mirrored that produced by moving stimuli. This was accomplished by generating stimulus elements which were spectrally either broadband or low-pass. For the motion used, the spectral difference between static broadband and static low-pass elements matched the spectral difference between moving and static broadband elements. On the hypothesis that segmentation from motion is based on the detection of regions devoid of high spatial-frequencies, both tasks should be similarly difficult for human observers. However, neither image segmentation (nor, incidentally, motion detection) was sensitive to the high spatial-frequency content of the stimuli. Thus changes in perceptual form produced by moving stimuli appear not to be used as a cue for image segmentation.

ei

[BibTex]


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Visual tracking for moving multiple objects: an integration of vision and control

Sitti, M, Bozma, I, Denker, A

In Industrial Electronics, 1995. ISIE’95., Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on, 2, pages: 535-540, 1995 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Batting a ball: Dynamics of a rhythmic skill

Sternad, D., Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G.

In Studies in Perception and Action, pages: 119-122, (Editors: Bardy, B.;Bostma, R.;Guiard, Y.), Erlbaum, Hillsdayle, NJ, 1995, clmc (inbook)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Memory-based neural networks for robot learning

Atkeson, C. G., Schaal, S.

Neurocomputing, 9, pages: 1-27, 1995, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper explores a memory-based approach to robot learning, using memory-based neural networks to learn models of the task to be performed. Steinbuch and Taylor presented neural network designs to explicitly store training data and do nearest neighbor lookup in the early 1960s. In this paper their nearest neighbor network is augmented with a local model network, which fits a local model to a set of nearest neighbors. This network design is equivalent to a statistical approach known as locally weighted regression, in which a local model is formed to answer each query, using a weighted regression in which nearby points (similar experiences) are weighted more than distant points (less relevant experiences). We illustrate this approach by describing how it has been used to enable a robot to learn a difficult juggling task. Keywords: memory-based, robot learning, locally weighted regression, nearest neighbor, local models.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

1990


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A model for the detection of motion over time

Black, M. J., Anandan, P.

In Proc. Int. Conf. on Computer Vision, ICCV-90, pages: 33-37, Osaka, Japan, December 1990 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a model for the recovery of visual motion fields from image sequences. Our model exploits three constraints on the motion of a patch in the environment: i) Data Conservation: the intensity structure corresponding to an environmental surface patch changes gradually over time; ii) Spatial Coherence: since surfaces have spatial extent neighboring points have similar motions; iii) Temporal Coherence: the direction and velocity of motion for a surface patch changes gradually. The formulation of the constraints takes into account the possibility of multiple motions at a particular location. We also present a highly parallel computational model for realizing these constraints in which computation occurs locally, knowledge about the motion increases over time, and occlusion and disocclusion boundaries are estimated. An implementation of the model using a stochastic temporal updating scheme is described. Experiments with both synthetic and real imagery are presented.

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pdf [BibTex]

1990


pdf [BibTex]


Thumb xl bildschirmfoto 2013 01 14 um 12.14.18
Constraints for the early detection of discontinuity from motion

Black, M. J., Anandan, P.

In Proc. National Conf. on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI-90, pages: 1060-1066, Boston, MA, 1990 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Surface discontinuities are detected in a sequence of images by exploiting physical constraints at early stages in the processing of visual motion. To achieve accurate early discontinuity detection we exploit five physical constraints on the presence of discontinuities: i) the shape of the sum of squared differences (SSD) error surface in the presence of surface discontinuities; ii) the change in the shape of the SSD surface due to relative surface motion; iii) distribution of optic flow in a neighborhood of a discontinuity; iv) spatial consistency of discontinuities; V) temporal consistency of discontinuities. The constraints are described, and experimental results on sequences of real and synthetic images are presented. The work has applications in the recovery of environmental structure from motion and in the generation of dense optic flow fields.

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pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Accurate Vision-based Manipulation through Contact Reasoning

Kloss, A., Bauza, M., Wu, J., Tenenbaum, J. B., Rodriguez, A., Bohg, J.

In International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May (inproceedings) Submitted

Abstract
Planning contact interactions is one of the core challenges of many robotic tasks. Optimizing contact locations while taking dynamics into account is computationally costly and in only partially observed environments, executing contact-based tasks often suffers from low accuracy. We present an approach that addresses these two challenges for the problem of vision-based manipulation. First, we propose to disentangle contact from motion optimization. Thereby, we improve planning efficiency by focusing computation on promising contact locations. Second, we use a hybrid approach for perception and state estimation that combines neural networks with a physically meaningful state representation. In simulation and real-world experiments on the task of planar pushing, we show that our method is more efficient and achieves a higher manipulation accuracy than previous vision-based approaches.

am

[BibTex]


[BibTex]


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In vivo diabetic wound healing with nanofibrous scaffolds modified with gentamicin and recombinant human epidermal growth factor

Dwivedi, C., Pandey, I., Pandey, H., Patil, S., Mishra, S. B., Pandey, A. C., Zamboni, P., Ramteke, P. W., Singh, A. V.

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 106(3):641-651, March (article)

Abstract
Abstract Diabetic wounds are susceptible to microbial infection. The treatment of these wounds requires a higher payload of growth factors. With this in mind, the strategy for this study was to utilize a novel payload comprising of Eudragit RL/RS 100 nanofibers carrying the bacterial inhibitor gentamicin sulfate (GS) in concert with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF); an accelerator of wound healing. GS containing Eudragit was electrospun to yield nanofiber scaffolds, which were further modified by covalent immobilization of rhEGF to their surface. This novel fabricated nanoscaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X‐ray diffraction. The thermal behavior of the nanoscaffold was determined using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. In the in vitro antibacterial assays, the nanoscaffolds exhibited comparable antibacterial activity to pure gentemicin powder. In vivo work using female C57/BL6 mice, the nanoscaffolds induced faster wound healing activity in dorsal wounds compared to the control. The paradigm in this study presents a robust in vivo model to enhance the applicability of drug delivery systems in wound healing applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 641–651, 2018.

pi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl gpcr cons
Classified Regression for Bayesian Optimization: Robot Learning with Unknown Penalties

Marco, A., Baumann, D., Hennig, P., Trimpe, S.

Submitted to Journal (under review) (article)

Abstract
Learning robot controllers by minimizing a black-box objective cost using Bayesian optimization (BO) can be time-consuming and challenging. It is very often the case that some roll-outs result in failure behaviors, causing premature experiment detention. In such cases, the designer is forced to decide on heuristic cost penalties because the acquired data is often scarce, or not comparable with that of the stable policies. To overcome this, we propose a Bayesian model that captures exactly what we know about the cost of unstable controllers prior to data collection: Nothing, except that it should be a somewhat large number. The resulting Bayesian model, approximated with a Gaussian process, predicts high cost values in regions where failures are likely to occur. In this way, the model guides the BO exploration toward regions of stability. We demonstrate the benefits of the proposed model in several illustrative and statistical synthetic benchmarks, and also in experiments on a real robotic platform. In addition, we propose and experimentally validate a new BO method to account for unknown constraints. Such method is an extension of Max-Value Entropy Search, a recent information-theoretic method, to solve unconstrained global optimization problems.

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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test jon
(book)

[BibTex]