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2007


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Vacancy-interstitial annihilation in titanomagnetite by thermal annealing

Walz, F., Brabers, V. A. M., Brabers, J. H. V. J., Kronmüller, H.

{Physica Status Solidi (A)}, 204(10):3514-3525, 2007 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

2007


DOI [BibTex]


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Theory of X-ray absorption spectroscopy in solids: mixing of the core states by the aspherical effective potential

Kostoglou, C., Komelj, M., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 75, 2007 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Micromagnetism-microstructure relations and the hysteresis loop

Goll, D.

In Handbook of Magnetism and Advanced Magnetic Materials. Vol. 2: Micromagnetism, pages: 1023-1058, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2007 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Zinc oxide microcapsules obtained via a bio-inspired approach

Lipowsky, P., Hirscher, M., Hoffmann, R. C., Bill, J., Aldinger, F.

{Nanotechnology}, 18, 2007 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Grain boundary phase observed in Al-5 at.\textpercent Zn alloy by using HREM

Straumal, B. B., Mazilkin, A. A., Kogtenkova, O. A., Protasova, S. G., Baretzky, B.

{Philosophical Magazine Letters}, 87(6):423-430, 2007 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Transport current improvements of in situ MgB2 tapes by the addition of carbon nanotubes, silicon carbide or graphite

Kovac, P., Husek, I., Skakalova, V., Meyer, J., Dobrocka, E., Hirscher, M., Roth, S.

{Superconductor Science and Technology}, 20, pages: 105-111, 2007 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Biologically Inspired System for Action Recognition

Jhuang, H., Serre, T., Wolf, L., Poggio, T.

In International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), 2007 (inproceedings)

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code pdf [BibTex]

code pdf [BibTex]


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Learning an Outlier-Robust Kalman Filter

Ting, J., Theodorou, E., Schaal, S.

CLMC Technical Report: TR-CLMC-2007-1, Los Angeles, CA, 2007, clmc (techreport)

Abstract
We introduce a modified Kalman filter that performs robust, real-time outlier detection, without the need for manual parameter tuning by the user. Systems that rely on high quality sensory data (for instance, robotic systems) can be sensitive to data containing outliers. The standard Kalman filter is not robust to outliers, and other variations of the Kalman filter have been proposed to overcome this issue. However, these methods may require manual parameter tuning, use of heuristics or complicated parameter estimation procedures. Our Kalman filter uses a weighted least squares-like approach by introducing weights for each data sample. A data sample with a smaller weight has a weaker contribution when estimating the current time step?s state. Using an incremental variational Expectation-Maximization framework, we learn the weights and system dynamics. We evaluate our Kalman filter algorithm on data from a robotic dog.

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PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Task space control with prioritization for balance and locomotion

Mistry, M., Nakanishi, J., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robotics Systems (IROS 2007), San Diego, CA: Oct. 29 Ð Nov. 2, 2007, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses locomotion with active balancing, via task space control with prioritization. The center of gravity (COG) and foot of the swing leg are treated as task space control points. Floating base inverse kinematics with constraints is employed, thereby allowing for a mobile platform suitable for locomotion. Different techniques of task prioritization are discussed and we clarify differences and similarities of previous suggested work. Varying levels of prioritization for control are examined with emphasis on singularity robustness and the negative effects of constraint switching. A novel controller for task space control of balance and locomotion is developed which attempts to address singularity robustness, while minimizing discontinuities created by constraint switching. Controllers are evaluated using a quadruped robot simulator engaging in a locomotion task.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Adhesion and anisotropic friction enhancements of angled heterogeneous micro-fiber arrays with spherical and spatula tips

Murphy, M. P., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, 21(12-13):1281-1296, Taylor & Francis Group, 2007 (article)

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Microrobotically fabricated biological scaffolds for tissue engineering

Nain, A. S., Chung, F., Rule, M., Jadlowiec, J. A., Campbell, P. G., Amon, C., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2007 IEEE International Conference on, pages: 1918-1923, 2007 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Surface-tension-driven biologically inspired water strider robots: Theory and experiments

Song, Y. S., Sitti, M.

IEEE Transactions on robotics, 23(3):578-589, IEEE, 2007 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bacterial flagella assisted propulsion of patterned latex particles: Effect of particle size

Behkam, B., Sitti, M.

In Nanotechnology, 2007. IEEE-NANO 2007. 7th IEEE Conference on, pages: 723-727, 2007 (inproceedings)

pi

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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A scaled bilateral control system for experimental 1-D teleoperated nanomanipulation applications

Onal, C. D., Pawashe, C., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2007. IROS 2007. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 483-488, 2007 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Guided Self-organisation for Autonomous Robot Development

Martius, G., Herrmann, J. M., Der, R.

In Advances in Artificial Life 9th European Conference, ECAL 2007, 4648, pages: 766-775, LNCS, Springer, 2007 (inproceedings)

al

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Hierarchical reactive control for a team of humanoid soccer robots

Behnke, S., Stueckler, J., Schreiber, M., Schulz, H., Böhnert, M., Meier, K.

In Proc. of the IEEE-RAS Int. Conf. on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids), pages: 622-629, November 2007 (inproceedings)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Zur ab-initio Elektronentheorie stark nichtkollinearer Spinsysteme

Köberle, I.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2007 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Theorie der Kernspektroskopie mit zirkular polarisierter Gammastrahlung

Engelhart, W.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2007 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Untersuchung der Adsorption von Wasserstoff in porösen Materialien

Hönes, K.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2007 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Untersuchung der mechanischen Eigenschaften dünner Chromschichten

Jüllig, P.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2007 (mastersthesis)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Absorption spectroscopy and XMCD at the Verwey transition of Fe3O4

Goering, E., Lafkioti, M., Gold, S., Schütz, G.

{Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials}, 310, pages: 249-251, 2007 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Overcoming the Dipolar Disorder in Dense CoFe Nanoparticle Ensembles: Superferromagnetism

Bedanta, S., Eimüller, T., Kleemann, W., Rhensius, J., Stromberg, F., Amaladass, E., Cardoso, S., Freitas, P. P.

{Physical Review Letters}, 98, 2007 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ultrafast nanomagnetic toggle switching of vortex cores

Hertel, R., Gliga, S., Fähnle, M., Schneider, C. M.

{Physical Review Letters}, 98, 2007 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Element-specific spin and orbital momentum dynamics of Fe/Gd multilayers

Bartelt, A. F., Comin, A., Feng, J., Nasiatka, J. R., Eimüller, T., Ludescher, B., Schütz, G., Padmore, H. A., Young, A. T., Scholl, A.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 90, 2007 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Slow relaxation of spin reorientation following ultrafast optical excitation

Eimüller, T., Scholl, A., Ludescher, B., Schütz, G., Thiele, J.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 91, 2007 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dissipative magnetization dynamics close to the adiabatic regime

Fähnle, M., Steiauf, D.

In Handbook of Magnetism and Advanced Magnetic Materials. Vol. 1: Fundamental and Theory, pages: 282-302, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2007 (incollection)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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One-pot synthesis of core-shell FeRh nanoparticles

Ciuculescu, D., Amiens, C., Respaud, M., Falqui, A., Lecante, P., Benfield, R. E., Jiang, L., Fauth, K., Chaudret, B.

{Chemistry of Materials}, 19(19):4624-4626, 2007 (article)

mms

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Spin-polarized quasiparticles injection effects in the normal state of YBCO thin films

Soltan, S., Albrecht, J., Habermeier, H.-U.

{Physica C}, 460-462, pages: 1088-1089, 2007 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Direct observation of the vortex core magnetization and its dynamics

Chou, K. W., Puzic, A., Stoll, H., Dolgos, D., Schütz, G., Van Waeyenberge, B., Vansteenkiste, A., Tyliszczak, T., Woltersdorf, G., Back, C. H.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 90, 2007 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Superparamagnetism in small Fe clusters on Cu(111)

Ballentine, G., He\ssler, M., Kinza, M., Fauth, K.

{The European Physical Journal D}, 45, pages: 535-537, 2007 (article)

mms

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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AREADNE Research in Encoding And Decoding of Neural Ensembles

Shakhnarovich, G., Hochberg, L. R., Donoghue, J. P., Stein, J., Brown, R. H., Krivickas, L. S., Friehs, G. M., Black, M. J.

Program No. 517.8. 2007 Abstract Viewer and Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA, 2007, Online (conference)

ps

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2002


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Real-Time Statistical Learning for Oculomotor Control and Visuomotor Coordination

Vijayakumar, S., Souza, A., Peters, J., Conradt, J., Rutkowski, T., Ijspeert, A., Nakanishi, J., Inoue, M., Shibata, T., Wiryo, A., Itti, L., Amari, S., Schaal, S.

(Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), December 2002 (poster)

ei

Web [BibTex]

2002


Web [BibTex]


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Optimized Support Vector Machines for Nonstationary Signal Classification

Davy, M., Gretton, A., Doucet, A., Rayner, P.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(12):442-445, December 2002 (article)

Abstract
This letter describes an efficient method to perform nonstationary signal classification. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is introduced and its parameters optimised in a principled way. Simulations demonstrate that our low complexity method outperforms state-of-the-art nonstationary signal classification techniques.

ei

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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Learning with Kernels: Support Vector Machines, Regularization, Optimization, and Beyond

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

pages: 644, Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2002, Parts of this book, including an introduction to kernel methods, can be downloaded here. (book)

Abstract
In the 1990s, a new type of learning algorithm was developed, based on results from statistical learning theory: the Support Vector Machine (SVM). This gave rise to a new class of theoretically elegant learning machines that use a central concept of SVMs-kernels—for a number of learning tasks. Kernel machines provide a modular framework that can be adapted to different tasks and domains by the choice of the kernel function and the base algorithm. They are replacing neural networks in a variety of fields, including engineering, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. Learning with Kernels provides an introduction to SVMs and related kernel methods. Although the book begins with the basics, it also includes the latest research. It provides all of the concepts necessary to enable a reader equipped with some basic mathematical knowledge to enter the world of machine learning using theoretically well-founded yet easy-to-use kernel algorithms and to understand and apply the powerful algorithms that have been developed over the last few years.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Surface-slant-from-texture discrimination: Effects of slant level and texture type

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):300, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The problem of surface-slant-from-texture was studied psychophysically by measuring the performances of five human subjects in a slant-discrimination task with a number of different types of textures: uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, polka dots, Voronoi tessellations, orthogonal sinusoidal plaid patterns, fractal or 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a “diffusion-based” texture (leopard skin-like). The results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) A “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular slant characterized by a psychometric function that is steeper in the direction of the more slanted orientation. (3) For sufficiently large slants (66 deg) there are no major differences in performance between any of the different textures. (4) For slants at 26, 37 and 53 degrees, however, there are marked differences between the different textures. (5) The observed differences in performance across textures for slants up to 53 degrees are systematic within subjects, and nearly so across them. This allows a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness” — that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the surface. Polka dots tended to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst up to the large slant of 66 degrees at which performance was almost independent of the particular texture chosen. Finally, our large number of 2AFC trials (approximately 2800 trials per texture across subjects) and associated tight confidence intervals may enable us to find out about which statistical properties of the textures could be responsible for surface-slant-from-texture estimation, with the ultimate goal of being able to predict observer performance for any arbitrary texture.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision

Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 2(10):7, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast, the results of which allow different models of contrast processing (e.g. energy versus gain-control models) to be critically assessed (Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Studies of detection and discrimination using pulse train stimuli in noise, on the other hand, make predictions about the number, position and properties of noise sources within the processing stream (Henning, Bird & Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results combining data from both sinusoidal and pulse train experiments in and without noise to arrive at a more tightly constrained model of early spatial vision.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Gender Classification of Human Faces

Graf, A., Wichmann, F.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, pages: 1-18, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., S.W. Lee, T. A. Poggio and C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses the issue of combining pre-processing methods—dimensionality reduction using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE)—with Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification for a behaviorally important task in humans: gender classification. A processed version of the MPI head database is used as stimulus set. First, summary statistics of the head database are studied. Subsequently the optimal parameters for LLE and the SVM are sought heuristically. These values are then used to compare the original face database with its processed counterpart and to assess the behavior of a SVM with respect to changes in illumination and perspective of the face images. Overall, PCA was superior in classification performance and allowed linear separability.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Insect-Inspired Estimation of Self-Motion

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, (2525):171-180, LNCS, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H. , S.W. Lee, T.A. Poggio, C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge about the environment. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Pulse train detection and discrimination in pink noise

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):229, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on the display was measured and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband "pink" noise, designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train, made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. In contrast, a 2.09-c/deg "super train," constructed to have 8 equally detectable harmonics, was a factor of five more detectable than any of its components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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A New Discriminative Kernel from Probabilistic Models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 14(10):2397-2414, October 2002 (article)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Combining sensory Information to Improve Visualization

Ernst, M., Banks, M., Wichmann, F., Maloney, L., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization ‘02 (VIS ‘02), pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R. , M. Joy), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE Conference on Visualization (VIS '02), October 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Seemingly effortlessly the human brain reconstructs the three-dimensional environment surrounding us from the light pattern striking the eyes. This seems to be true across almost all viewing and lighting conditions. One important factor for this apparent easiness is the redundancy of information provided by the sensory organs. For example, perspective distortions, shading, motion parallax, or the disparity between the two eyes' images are all, at least partly, redundant signals which provide us with information about the three-dimensional layout of the visual scene. Our brain uses all these different sensory signals and combines the available information into a coherent percept. In displays visualizing data, however, the information is often highly reduced and abstracted, which may lead to an altered perception and therefore a misinterpretation of the visualized data. In this panel we will discuss mechanisms involved in the combination of sensory information and their implications for simulations using computer displays, as well as problems resulting from current display technology such as cathode-ray tubes.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Sampling Techniques for Kernel Methods

Achlioptas, D., McSherry, F., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 14 , pages: 335-342, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose randomized techniques for speeding up Kernel Principal Component Analysis on three levels: sampling and quantization of the Gram matrix in training, randomized rounding in evaluating the kernel expansions, and random projections in evaluating the kernel itself. In all three cases, we give sharp bounds on the accuracy of the obtained approximations.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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The Infinite Hidden Markov Model

Beal, MJ., Ghahramani, Z., Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 577-584, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We show that it is possible to extend hidden Markov models to have a countably infinite number of hidden states. By using the theory of Dirichlet processes we can implicitly integrate out the infinitely many transition parameters, leaving only three hyperparameters which can be learned from data. These three hyperparameters define a hierarchical Dirichlet process capable of capturing a rich set of transition dynamics. The three hyperparameters control the time scale of the dynamics, the sparsity of the underlying state-transition matrix, and the expected number of distinct hidden states in a finite sequence. In this framework it is also natural to allow the alphabet of emitted symbols to be infinite - consider, for example, symbols being possible words appearing in English text.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A new discriminative kernel from probabilistic models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 977-984, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, Jaakkola and Haussler proposed a method for constructing kernel functions from probabilistic models. Their so called \Fisher kernel" has been combined with discriminative classi ers such as SVM and applied successfully in e.g. DNA and protein analysis. Whereas the Fisher kernel (FK) is calculated from the marginal log-likelihood, we propose the TOP kernel derived from Tangent vectors Of Posterior log-odds. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical framework on feature extractors from probabilistic models and use it for analyzing the TOP kernel. In experiments our new discriminative TOP kernel compares favorably to the Fisher kernel.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Incorporating Invariances in Non-Linear Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 609-616, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The choice of an SVM kernel corresponds to the choice of a representation of the data in a feature space and, to improve performance, it should therefore incorporate prior knowledge such as known transformation invariances. We propose a technique which extends earlier work and aims at incorporating invariances in nonlinear kernels. We show on a digit recognition task that the proposed approach is superior to the Virtual Support Vector method, which previously had been the method of choice.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Bartnik, E., Zien, A., Zimmer, R.

Pharmacogenomics, 3(5):635-650, September 2002 (article)

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Kernel feature spaces and nonlinear blind source separation

Harmeling, S., Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 761-768, (Editors: Dietterich, T. G., S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In kernel based learning the data is mapped to a kernel feature space of a dimension that corresponds to the number of training data points. In practice, however, the data forms a smaller submanifold in feature space, a fact that has been used e.g. by reduced set techniques for SVMs. We propose a new mathematical construction that permits to adapt to the intrinsic dimension and to find an orthonormal basis of this submanifold. In doing so, computations get much simpler and more important our theoretical framework allows to derive elegant kernelized blind source separation (BSS) algorithms for arbitrary invertible nonlinear mixings. Experiments demonstrate the good performance and high computational efficiency of our kTDSEP algorithm for the problem of nonlinear BSS.

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Constructing Boosting algorithms from SVMs: an application to one-class classification.

Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24(9):1184-1199, September 2002 (article)

Abstract
We show via an equivalence of mathematical programs that a support vector (SV) algorithm can be translated into an equivalent boosting-like algorithm and vice versa. We exemplify this translation procedure for a new algorithm—one-class leveraging—starting from the one-class support vector machine (1-SVM). This is a first step toward unsupervised learning in a boosting framework. Building on so-called barrier methods known from the theory of constrained optimization, it returns a function, written as a convex combination of base hypotheses, that characterizes whether a given test point is likely to have been generated from the distribution underlying the training data. Simulations on one-class classification problems demonstrate the usefulness of our approach.

ei

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel Dependency Estimation

Weston, J., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Vapnik, V.

(98), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, August 2002 (techreport)

Abstract
We consider the learning problem of finding a dependency between a general class of objects and another, possibly different, general class of objects. The objects can be for example: vectors, images, strings, trees or graphs. Such a task is made possible by employing similarity measures in both input and output spaces using kernel functions, thus embedding the objects into vector spaces. Output kernels also make it possible to encode prior information and/or invariances in the loss function in an elegant way. We experimentally validate our approach on several tasks: mapping strings to strings, pattern recognition, and reconstruction from partial images.

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Phase information in the recognition of natural images

Braun, D., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

Perception, 31(ECVP Abstract Supplement):133, 25th European Conference on Visual Perception, August 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Fourier phase plays an important role in determining global image structure. For example, when the phase spectrum of an image of a flower is swapped with that of a tank, we usually perceive a tank, even though the amplitude spectrum is still that of the flower. Similarly, when the phase spectrum of an image is randomly swapped across frequencies, that is its Fourier energy is randomly distributed over the image, the resulting image becomes impossible to recognise. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of phase manipulations in a quantitative manner. Subjects viewed two images of natural scenes, one of which contained an animal (the target) embedded in the background. The spectra of the images were manipulated by adding random phase noise at each frequency. The phase noise was the independent variable, uniformly distributed between 0° and ±180°. Subjects were remarkably resistant to phase noise. Even with ±120° noise, subjects were still 75% correct. The proportion of correct answers closely followed the correlation between original and noise-distorted images. Thus it appears as if it was not the global phase information per se that determines our percept of natural images, but rather the effect of phase on local image features.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]