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1999


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Entropy numbers, operators and support vector kernels.

Williamson, R., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning, pages: 127-144, (Editors: B Schölkopf and CJC Burges and AJ Smola), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

1999


[BibTex]


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Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Smola, A.

MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (book)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Fisher discriminant analysis with kernels

Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

In Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Signal Processing Society Workshop, 9, pages: 41-48, (Editors: Y-H Hu and J Larsen and E Wilson and S Douglas), IEEE, Neural Networks for Signal Processing IX, 1999 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Artscience Sciencart
Artscience Sciencart

Black, M. J., Levy, D., PamelaZ,

In Art and Innovation: The Xerox PARC Artist-in-Residence Program, pages: 244-300, (Editors: Harris, C.), MIT-Press, 1999 (incollection)

Abstract
One of the effects of the PARC Artist In Residence (PAIR) program has been to expose the strong connections between scientists and artists. Both do what they do because they need to do it. They are often called upon to justify their work in order to be allowed to continue to do it. They need to justify it to funders, to sponsoring institutions, corporations, the government, the public. They publish papers, teach workshops, and write grants touting the educational or health benefits of what they do. All of these things are to some extent valid, but the fact of the matter is: artists and scientists do their work because they are driven to do it. They need to explore and create.

This chapter attempts to give a flavor of one multi-way "PAIRing" between performance artist PamelaZ and two PARC researchers, Michael Black and David Levy. The three of us paired up because we found each other interesting. We chose each other. While most artists in the program are paired with a single researcher Pamela jokingly calls herself a bigamist for choosing two PAIR "husbands" with different backgrounds and interests.

There are no "rules" to the PAIR program; no one told us what to do with our time. Despite this we all had a sense that we needed to produce something tangible during Pamela's year-long residency. In fact, Pamela kept extending her residency because she did not feel as though we had actually made anything concrete. The interesting thing was that all along we were having great conversations, some of which Pamela recorded. What we did not see at the time was that it was these conversations between artists and scientists that are at the heart of the PAIR program and that these conversations were changing the way we thought about our own work and the relationships between science and art.

To give these conversations their due, and to allow the reader into our PAIR interactions, we include two of our many conversations in this chapter.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Tele-touch feedback of surfaces at the micro/nano scale: Modeling and experiments

Sitti, M., Horighuchi, S., Hashimoto, H.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems, 1999. IROS’99. Proceedings. 1999 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, 2, pages: 882-888, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Parameterized modeling and recognition of activities
Parameterized modeling and recognition of activities

Yacoob, Y., Black, M. J.

Computer Vision and Image Understanding, 73(2):232-247, 1999 (article)

Abstract
In this paper we consider a class of human activities—atomic activities—which can be represented as a set of measurements over a finite temporal window (e.g., the motion of human body parts during a walking cycle) and which has a relatively small space of variations in performance. A new approach for modeling and recognition of atomic activities that employs principal component analysis and analytical global transformations is proposed. The modeling of sets of exemplar instances of activities that are similar in duration and involve similar body part motions is achieved by parameterizing their representation using principal component analysis. The recognition of variants of modeled activities is achieved by searching the space of admissible parameterized transformations that these activities can undergo. This formulation iteratively refines the recognition of the class to which the observed activity belongs and the transformation parameters that relate it to the model in its class. We provide several experiments on recognition of articulated and deformable human motions from image motion parameters.

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pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]


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Challenge to micro/nanomanipulation using atomic force microscope

Hashimoto, H., Sitti, M.

In Micromechatronics and Human Science, 1999. MHS’99. Proceedings of 1999 International Symposium on, pages: 35-42, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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< 研究速報>(< 小特集> マイクロマシン)

Sitti, M., 橋本秀紀,

生産研究, 51(8):651-653, 東京大学, 1999 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Explaining optical flow events with parameterized spatio-temporal models
Explaining optical flow events with parameterized spatio-temporal models

Black, M. J.

In IEEE Proc. Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR’99, pages: 326-332, IEEE, Fort Collins, CO, 1999 (inproceedings)

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pdf video [BibTex]

pdf video [BibTex]


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Visualization interface for AFM-based nano-manipulation

Horiguchi, S., Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

In Industrial Electronics, 1999. ISIE’99. Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on, 1, pages: 310-315, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Micro/Nano Manipulation Using Atomic Force Microscope.

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

生産研究, 51(8):651-653, 東京大学生産技術研究所, 1999 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Is imitation learning the route to humanoid robots?

Schaal, S.

Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 3(6):233-242, 1999, clmc (article)

Abstract
This review will focus on two recent developments in artificial intelligence and neural computation: learning from imitation and the development of humanoid robots. It will be postulated that the study of imitation learning offers a promising route to gain new insights into mechanisms of perceptual motor control that could ultimately lead to the creation of autonomous humanoid robots. This hope is justified because imitation learning channels research efforts towards three important issues: efficient motor learning, the connection between action and perception, and modular motor control in form of movement primitives. In order to make these points, first, a brief review of imitation learning will be given from the view of psychology and neuroscience. In these fields, representations and functional connections between action and perception have been explored that contribute to the understanding of motor acts of other beings. The recent discovery that some areas in the primate brain are active during both movement perception and execution provided a first idea of the possible neural basis of imitation. Secondly, computational approaches to imitation learning will be described, initially from the perspective of traditional AI and robotics, and then with a focus on neural network models and statistical learning research. Parallels and differences between biological and computational approaches to imitation will be highlighted. The review will end with an overview of current projects that actually employ imitation learning for humanoid robots.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Tele-nanorobotics 2-d manipulation of micro/nanoparticles using afm

Sitti, M., Horiguchi, S., Hashimoto, H.

In Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, 1999. Proceedings. 1999 IEEE/ASME International Conference on, pages: 786-786, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Virtual Reality-Based Teleoperation in the Micro/Nano World.

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

生産研究, 51(8):654-656, 東京大学生産技術研究所, 1999 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Nonparametric regression for learning nonlinear transformations

Schaal, S.

In Prerational Intelligence in Strategies, High-Level Processes and Collective Behavior, 2, pages: 595-621, (Editors: Ritter, H.;Cruse, H.;Dean, J.), Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
Information processing in animals and artificial movement systems consists of a series of transformations that map sensory signals to intermediate representations, and finally to motor commands. Given the physical and neuroanatomical differences between individuals and the need for plasticity during development, it is highly likely that such transformations are learned rather than pre-programmed by evolution. Such self-organizing processes, capable of discovering nonlinear dependencies between different groups of signals, are one essential part of prerational intelligence. While neural network algorithms seem to be the natural choice when searching for solutions for learning transformations, this paper will take a more careful look at which types of neural networks are actually suited for the requirements of an autonomous learning system. The approach that we will pursue is guided by recent developments in learning theory that have linked neural network learning to well established statistical theories. In particular, this new statistical understanding has given rise to the development of neural network systems that are directly based on statistical methods. One family of such methods stems from nonparametric regression. This paper will compare nonparametric learning with the more widely used parametric counterparts in a non technical fashion, and investigate how these two families differ in their properties and their applicabilities. We will argue that nonparametric neural networks offer a set of characteristics that make them a very promising candidate for on-line learning in autonomous system.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Segmentation of endpoint trajectories does not imply segmented control

Sternad, D., Schaal, D.

Experimental Brain Research, 124(1):118-136, 1999, clmc (article)

Abstract
While it is generally assumed that complex movements consist of a sequence of simpler units, the quest to define these units of action, or movement primitives, still remains an open question. In this context, two hypotheses of movement segmentation of endpoint trajectories in 3D human drawing movements are re-examined: (1) the stroke-based segmentation hypothesis based on the results that the proportionality coefficient of the 2/3 power law changes discontinuously with each new â??strokeâ?, and (2) the segmentation hypothesis inferred from the observation of piecewise planar endpoint trajectories of 3D drawing movements. In two experiments human subjects performed a set of elliptical and figure-8 patterns of different sizes and orientations using their whole arm in 3D. The kinematic characteristics of the endpoint trajectories and the seven joint angles of the arm were analyzed. While the endpoint trajectories produced similar segmentation features as reported in the literature, analyses of the joint angles show no obvious segmentation but rather continuous oscillatory patterns. By approximating the joint angle data of human subjects with sinusoidal trajectories, and by implementing this model on a 7-degree-of-freedom anthropomorphic robot arm, it is shown that such a continuous movement strategy can produce exactly the same features as observed by the above segmentation hypotheses. The origin of this apparent segmentation of endpoint trajectories is traced back to the nonlinear transformations of the forward kinematics of human arms. The presented results demonstrate that principles of discrete movement generation may not be reconciled with those of rhythmic movement as easily as has been previously suggested, while the generalization of nonlinear pattern generators to arm movements can offer an interesting alternative to approach the question of units of action.

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Two-dimensional fine particle positioning using a piezoresistive cantilever as a micro/nano-manipulator

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

In Robotics and Automation, 1999. Proceedings. 1999 IEEE International Conference on, 4, pages: 2729-2735, 1999 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Teleoperated nano scale object manipulation

Sitti, M., Hashimoto, H.

Recent Advances on Mechatronics, pages: 322-335, Singapore: Springer-Verlag, 1999 (article)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]