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2018


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Acoustic Fabrication via the Assembly and Fusion of Particles

Melde, K., Choi, E., Wu, Z., Palagi, S., Qiu, T., Fischer, P.

Advanced Materials, 30(3):1704507, January 2018 (article)

Abstract
Acoustic assembly promises a route toward rapid parallel fabrication of whole objects directly from solution. This study reports the contact-free and maskless assembly, and fixing of silicone particles into arbitrary 2D shapes using ultrasound fields. Ultrasound passes through an acoustic hologram to form a target image. The particles assemble from a suspension along lines of high pressure in the image due to acoustic radiation forces and are then fixed (crosslinked) in a UV-triggered reaction. For this, the particles are loaded with a photoinitiator by solvent-induced swelling. This localizes the reaction and allows the bulk suspension to be reused. The final fabricated parts are mechanically stable and self-supporting.

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Deep EndoVO: A recurrent convolutional neural network (RCNN) based visual odometry approach for endoscopic capsule robots

Turan, M., Almalioglu, Y., Araujo, H., Konukoglu, E., Sitti, M.

Neurocomputing, 275, pages: 1861 - 1870, January 2018 (article)

Abstract
Ingestible wireless capsule endoscopy is an emerging minimally invasive diagnostic technology for inspection of the GI tract and diagnosis of a wide range of diseases and pathologies. Medical device companies and many research groups have recently made substantial progresses in converting passive capsule endoscopes to active capsule robots, enabling more accurate, precise, and intuitive detection of the location and size of the diseased areas. Since a reliable real time pose estimation functionality is crucial for actively controlled endoscopic capsule robots, in this study, we propose a monocular visual odometry (VO) method for endoscopic capsule robot operations. Our method lies on the application of the deep recurrent convolutional neural networks (RCNNs) for the visual odometry task, where convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and recurrent neural networks (RNNs) are used for the feature extraction and inference of dynamics across the frames, respectively. Detailed analyses and evaluations made on a real pig stomach dataset proves that our system achieves high translational and rotational accuracies for different types of endoscopic capsule robot trajectories.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Small-scale soft-bodied robot with multimodal locomotion

Hu, W., Lum, G. Z., Mastrangeli, M., Sitti, M.

Nature, 554, pages: 81-85, Nature, January 2018 (article)

Abstract
Untethered small-scale (from several millimetres down to a few micrometres in all dimensions) robots that can non-invasively access confined, enclosed spaces may enable applications in microfactories such as the construction of tissue scaffolds by robotic assembly1, in bioengineering such as single-cell manipulation and biosensing2, and in healthcare3,4,5,6 such as targeted drug delivery4 and minimally invasive surgery3,5. Existing small-scale robots, however, have very limited mobility because they are unable to negotiate obstacles and changes in texture or material in unstructured environments7,8,9,10,11,12,13. Of these small-scale robots, soft robots have greater potential to realize high mobility via multimodal locomotion, because such machines have higher degrees of freedom than their rigid counterparts14,15,16. Here we demonstrate magneto-elastic soft millimetre-scale robots that can swim inside and on the surface of liquids, climb liquid menisci, roll and walk on solid surfaces, jump over obstacles, and crawl within narrow tunnels. These robots can transit reversibly between different liquid and solid terrains, as well as switch between locomotive modes. They can additionally execute pick-and-place and cargo-release tasks. We also present theoretical models to explain how the robots move. Like the large-scale robots that can be used to study locomotion17, these soft small-scale robots could be used to study soft-bodied locomotion produced by small organisms.

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Light‐Driven Janus Hollow Mesoporous TiO2–Au Microswimmers

Sridhar, V., Park, B., Sitti, M.

Advanced Functional Materials, 28(5):1704902, January 2018 (article)

Abstract
Abstract Light‐driven microswimmers have garnered attention for their potential use in various applications, such as environmental remediation, hydrogen evolution, and targeted drug delivery. Janus hollow mesoporous TiO2/Au (JHP–TiO2–Au) microswimmers with enhanced swimming speeds under low‐intensity ultraviolet (UV) light are presented. The swimmers show enhanced swimming speeds both in presence and absence of H2O2. The microswimmers move due to self‐electrophoresis when UV light is incident on them. There is a threefold increase in speed of JHP–TiO2–Au microswimmers in comparison with Janus solid TiO2/Au (JS–TiO2–Au) microswimmers. This increase in their speed is due to the increase in surface area of the porous swimmers and their hollow structure. These microswimmers are also made steerable by using a thin Co magnetic layer. They can be used in potential environmental applications for active photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and targeted active drug delivery of an anticancer drug (doxurobicin) in vitro in H2O2 solution. Their increased speed from the presence of a hollow mesoporous structure is beneficial for future potential applications, such as hydrogen evolution, selective heterogeneous photocatalysis, and targeted cargo delivery.

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Mechanical Rubbing of Blood Clots Using Helical Robots Under Ultrasound Guidance

Khalil, I. S. M., Mahdy, D., Sharkawy, A. E., Moustafa, R. R., Tabak, A. F., Mitwally, M. E., Hesham, S., Hamdi, N., Klingner, A., Mohamed, A., Sitti, M.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 3(2):1112-1119, January 2018 (article)

Abstract
A simple way to mitigate the potential negative sideeffects associated with chemical lysis of a blood clot is to tear its fibrin network via mechanical rubbing using a helical robot. Here, we achieve mechanical rubbing of blood clots under ultrasound guidance and using external magnetic actuation. Position of the helical robot is determined using ultrasound feedback and used to control its motion toward the clot, whereas the volume of the clots is estimated simultaneously using visual feedback. We characterize the shear modulus and ultimate shear strength of the blood clots to predict their removal rate during rubbing. Our in vitro experiments show the ability to move the helical robot controllably toward clots using ultrasound feedback with average and maximum errors of 0.84 ± 0.41 and 2.15 mm, respectively, and achieve removal rate of -0.614 ± 0.303 mm3/min at room temperature (25 °C) and -0.482 ± 0.23 mm3/min at body temperature (37 °C), under the influence of two rotating dipole fields at frequency of 35 Hz. We also validate the effectiveness of mechanical rubbing by measuring the number of red blood cells and platelets past the clot. Our measurements show that rubbing achieves cell count of (46 ± 10.9) × 104 cell/ml, whereas the count in the absence of rubbing is (2 ± 1.41) × 104 cell/ml, after 40 min.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Distributed Event-Based State Estimation for Networked Systems: An LMI Approach

Muehlebach, M., Trimpe, S.

IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 63(1):269-276, January 2018 (article)

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arXiv (extended version) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

arXiv (extended version) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Method and device for reversibly attaching a phase changing metal to an object

Zhou Ye, G. Z. L. M. S.

US Patent Application US 2018/0021892 A1, January 2018 (patent)

Abstract
A method for reversibly attaching a phase changing metal to an object, the method comprising the steps of: providing a substrate having at least one surface at which the phase changing metal is attached, heating the phase changing metal above a phase changing temperature at which the phase changing metal changes its phase from solid to liquid, bringing the phase changing metal, when the phase changing metal is in the liquid phase or before the phase changing metal is brought into the liquid phase, into contact with the object, permitting the phase changing metal to cool below the phase changing temperature, whereby the phase changing metal becomes solid and the object and the phase changing metal become attached to each other, reheating the phase changing metal above the phase changing temperature to liquefy the phase changing metal, and removing the substrate from the object, with the phase changing metal separating from the object and remaining with the substrate.

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US Patent Application Database US Patent Application (PDF) [BibTex]


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Method of fabricating a shape-changeable magentic member, method of producing a shape changeable magnetic member and shape changeable magnetic member

Guo Zhan Lum, Z. Y. M. S.

US Patent Application US 2018/0012693 A1, January 2018 (patent)

Abstract
The present invention relates to a method of fabricating a shape-changeable magnetic member comprising a plurality of segments with each segment being able to be magnetized with a desired magnitude and orientation of magnetization, to a method of producing a shape changeable magnetic member composed of a plurality of segments and to a shape changeable magnetic member.

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US Patent Application Database US Patent Application (PDF) [BibTex]


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Enhanced Non-Steady Gliding Performance of the MultiMo-Bat through Optimal Airfoil Configuration and Control Strategy

Kim, H., Woodward, M. A., Sitti, M.

In 2018 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pages: 1382-1388, 2018 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Analysis of Magnetic Interaction in Remotely Controlled Magnetic Devices and Its Application to a Capsule Robot for Drug Delivery

Munoz, F., Alici, G., Zhou, H., Li, W., M. Sitti,

IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 23(1):298-310, 2018 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Anisotropic Gold Nanostructures: Optimization via in Silico Modeling for Hyperthermia

Singh, A., Jahnke, T., Wang, S., Xiao, Y., Alapan, Y., Kharratian, S., Onbasli, M. C., Kozielski, K., David, H., Richter, G., Bill, J., Laux, P., Luch, A., Sitti, M.

ACS Applied Nano Materials, 1(11):6205-6216, 2018 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Collectives of Spinning Mobile Microrobots for Navigation and Object Manipulation at the Air-Water Interface

Wang, W., Kishore, V., Koens, L., Lauga, E., Sitti, M.

In 2018 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pages: 1-9, 2018 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Incorporation of Terbium into a Microalga Leads to Magnetotactic Swimmers

Santomauro, G., Singh, A., Park, B. W., Mohammadrahimi, M., Erkoc, P., Goering, E., Schütz, G., Sitti, M., Bill, J.

Advanced Biosystems, 2(12):1800039, 2018 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Endo-VMFuseNet: A Deep Visual-Magnetic Sensor Fusion Approach for Endoscopic Capsule Robots

Turan, M., Almalioglu, Y., Gilbert, H. B., Sari, A. E., Soylu, U., Sitti, M.

In 2018 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 1-7, 2018 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Morphological intelligence counters foot slipping in the desert locust and dynamic robots

Woodward, M. A., Sitti, M.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 115, pages: E8358-E8367, 2018 (article)

Abstract
During dynamic terrestrial locomotion, animals use complex multifunctional feet to extract friction from the environment. However, whether roboticists assume sufficient surface friction for locomotion or actively compensate for slipping, they use relatively simple point-contact feet. We seek to understand and extract the morphological adaptations of animal feet that contribute to enhancing friction on diverse surfaces, such as the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) [Bennet-Clark HC (1975) J Exp Biol 63:53–83], which has both wet adhesive pads and spines. A buckling region in their knee to accommodate slipping [Bayley TG, Sutton GP, Burrows M (2012) J Exp Biol 215:1151–1161], slow nerve conduction velocity (0.5–3 m/s) [Pearson KG, Stein RB, Malhotra SK (1970) J Exp Biol 53:299–316], and an ecological pressure to enhance jumping performance for survival [Hawlena D, Kress H, Dufresne ER, Schmitz OJ (2011) Funct Ecol 25:279–288] further suggest that the locust operates near the limits of its surface friction, but without sufficient time to actively control its feet. Therefore, all surface adaptation must be through passive mechanics (morphological intelligence), which are unknown. Here, we report the slipping behavior, dynamic attachment, passive mechanics, and interplay between the spines and adhesive pads, studied through both biological and robotic experiments, which contribute to the locust’s ability to jump robustly from diverse surfaces. We found slipping to be surface-dependent and common (e.g., wood 1.32 ± 1.19 slips per jump), yet the morphological intelligence of the feet produces a significant chance to reengage the surface (e.g., wood 1.10 ± 1.13 reengagements per jump). Additionally, a discovered noncontact-type jump, further studied robotically, broadens the applicability of the morphological adaptations to both static and dynamic attachment.

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Endosensorfusion: Particle filtering-based multi-sensory data fusion with switching state-space model for endoscopic capsule robots

Turan, M., Almalioglu, Y., Gilbert, H., Araujo, H., Cemgil, T., Sitti, M.

In 2018 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 1-8, 2018 (inproceedings)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Three‐dimensional patterning in biomedicine: Importance and applications in neuropharmacology

Singh, A. V., Gharat, T., Batuwangala, M., Park, B. W., Endlein, T., Sitti, M.

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, 106(3):1369-1382, 2018 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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3D nanoprinted plastic kinoform x-ray optics

Sanli, U. T., Ceylan, H., Bykova, I., Weigand, M., Sitti, M., Schütz, G., Keskinbora, K.

{Advanced Materials}, 30(36), Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2018 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Controllable switching between planar and helical flagellar swimming of a soft robotic sperm

Khalil, I. S. M., Tabak, A. F., Seif, M. A., Klingner, A., Sitti, M.

PloS One, 13(11):e0206456, 2018 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kinetics of orbitally shaken particles constrained to two dimensions

Ipparthi, D., Hageman, T. A. G., Cambier, N., Sitti, M., Dorigo, M., Abelmann, L., Mastrangeli, M.

Physical Review E, 98(4):042137, 2018 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Seed-mediated synthesis of plasmonic gold nanoribbons using cancer cells for hyperthermia applications

Singh, A. V., Alapan, Y., Jahnke, T., Laux, P., Luch, A., Aghakhani, A., Kharratian, S., Onbasli, M. C., Bill, J., Sitti, M.

Journal of Materials Chemistry B, 6(46):7573-7581, 2018 (article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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In vivo diabetic wound healing with nanofibrous scaffolds modified with gentamicin and recombinant human epidermal growth factor

Dwivedi, C., Pandey, I., Pandey, H., Patil, S., Mishra, S. B., Pandey, A. C., Zamboni, P., Ramteke, P. W., Singh, A. V.

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 106(3):641-651, March (article)

Abstract
Abstract Diabetic wounds are susceptible to microbial infection. The treatment of these wounds requires a higher payload of growth factors. With this in mind, the strategy for this study was to utilize a novel payload comprising of Eudragit RL/RS 100 nanofibers carrying the bacterial inhibitor gentamicin sulfate (GS) in concert with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF); an accelerator of wound healing. GS containing Eudragit was electrospun to yield nanofiber scaffolds, which were further modified by covalent immobilization of rhEGF to their surface. This novel fabricated nanoscaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X‐ray diffraction. The thermal behavior of the nanoscaffold was determined using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. In the in vitro antibacterial assays, the nanoscaffolds exhibited comparable antibacterial activity to pure gentemicin powder. In vivo work using female C57/BL6 mice, the nanoscaffolds induced faster wound healing activity in dorsal wounds compared to the control. The paradigm in this study presents a robust in vivo model to enhance the applicability of drug delivery systems in wound healing applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 641–651, 2018.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Robotics Research

Tong, Chi Hay, Furgale, Paul, Barfoot, Timothy D, Guizilini, Vitor, Ramos, Fabio, Chen, Yushan, T\uumová, Jana, Ulusoy, Alphan, Belta, Calin, Tenorth, Moritz, others

(article)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]