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2015


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"Job-Sharing" storage of hydrogen in Ru/Li2O nanocomposites

Fu, L., Tang, K., Oh, H., Kandavel, M., Bräuniger, T., Vinod Chandran, C., Menzel, A., Hirscher, M., Samuelis, D., Maier, J.

{Nano Letters}, 15(6):4170-4175, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

2015


DOI [BibTex]


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Overview of the multilayer-Fresnel zone plate and the kinoform lens development at MPI for Intelligent Systems

Sanli, U., Keskinbora, K., Grévent, C., Schütz, G.

{Proceedings of SPIE}, 9510, SPIE, Bellingham, Washington, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]


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Transition matrix elements for electron-phonon scattering: Phenomenological theory and ab initio electron theory

Illg, C., Haag, M., Müller, B. Y., Czycholl, G., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 92(19), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Phase evolution in single-crystalline LiFePO4 followed by in situ scanning X-ray microscopy of a micrometre-sized battery

Ohmer, N., Fenk, B., Samuelis, D., Chen, C., Maier, J., Weigand, M., Goering, E., Schütz, G.

{Nature Communications}, 6, Nature Publishing Group, London, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Nitrogen-rich covalent triazine frameworks as high-performance platforms for selective carbon capture and storage

Hug, S., Stegbauer, L., Oh, H., Hirscher, M., Lotsch, B. V.

{Chemistry of Materials}, 27(23):8001-8010, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Multilayer Fresnel zone plates for X-ray microscopy

Sanli, U. T., Keskinbora, K., Grévent, C., Szeghalmi, A., Knez, M., Schütz, G.

{Microscopy and Microanalysis}, 21(Suppl 3):1987-1988, Springer-Verlag New York, New York, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Interfacial dominated ferromagnetism in nanograined ZnO: a \muSR and DFT study

Tietze, T., Audehm, P., Chen, Y., Schütz, G., Straumal, B. B., Protasova, S. G., Mazilkin, A. A., Straumal, P. B., Prokscha, T., Luetkens, H., Salman, Z., Suter, A., Baretzky, B., Fink, K., Wenzel, W., Danilov, D., Goering, E.

{Scientific Reports}, 5, pages: 8871-8876, Nature Publishing Group, London, UK, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Preparation of a ferromagnetic barrier in YBa2Cu3O7-delta thinner than the coherence length

Soltan, S., Albrecht, J., Goering, E., Schütz, G., Mustafa, L., Keimer, B., Habermeier, H.

{Journal of Applied Physics}, 118(22), AIP Publishing, New York, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Microanalytical methods for in-situ high-resolution analysis of rock varnish at the micrometer to nanometer scale

Macholdt, D. S., Jochum, K. P., Pöhlker, C., Stoll, B., Weis, U., Weber, B., Müller, M., Kapl, M., Buhre, S., Kilcoyne, A. L. D., Weigand, M., Scholz, D., Al-Amri, A. M., Andreae, M. O.

{Chemical Geology}, 411, pages: 57-68, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

Mikhailov, E. F., Mironov, G. N., Pöhlker, C., Chi, X., Krüger, M., Shiraiwa, M., Förster, J., Pöschl, U., Vlasenko, S. S., Ryshkevich, T. I., Weigand, M., Kilcoyne, A. L. D., Andreae, M.

{Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}, 15(15):8847-8869, European Geosciences Union, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Orbital reflectometry of PrNiO3/PrAlO3 superlattices

Wu, M., Benckiser, E., Audehm, P., Goering, E., Wochner, P., Christiani, G., Logvenov, G., Habermeier, H., Keimer, B.

{Physical Review B}, 91(19), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Dynamic domain wall chirality rectification by rotating magnetic fields

Bisig, A., Mawass, M., Stärk, M., Moutafis, C., Rhensius, J., Heidler, J., Gliga, S., Weigand, M., Tyliszczak, T., Van Waeyenberge, B., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Kläui, M.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106(12), American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Ultrafast demagnetization after laser pulse irradiation in Ni: Ab-initio electron-phonon scattering and phase space calculations

Illg, C., Haag, M., Fähnle, M.

In Ultrafast Magnetism I. Proceedings of the International Conference UMC 2013, 159, pages: 131-133, Springer Proceedings in Physics, Springer, Strasbourg, 2015 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Imaging spin dynamics on the nanoscale using X-ray microscopy

Stoll, H., Noske, M., Weigand, M., Richter, K., Krüger, B., Reeve, R. M., Hänze, M., Adolff, C. F., Stein, F., Meier, G., Kläui, M., Schütz, G.

{Frontiers in Physics}, 3, Frontiers Media, Lausanne, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Voltage-induced magnetic manipulation of a microstructured iron gold multilayer system

Sittig, Robert

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2015 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Unique high-temperature performance of highly consensed MnBi permanent magnets

Chen, Y., Gregori, G., Leineweber, A., Qu, F., Chen, C., Tietze, T., Kronmüller, H., Schütz, G., Goering, E.

{Scripta Materialia}, 107, pages: 131-135, Pergamon, Tarrytown, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Electrical determination of vortex state in submicron magnetic elements

Gangwar, A., Bauer, H. G., Chauleau, J., Noske, M., Weigand, M., Stoll, H., Schütz, G., Back, C. H.

{Physical Review B}, 91(9), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Mechanisms for the symmetric and antisymmetric switching of a magnetic vortex core: Differences and common aspects

Noske, M., Stoll, H., Fähnle, M., Hertel, R., Schütz, G.

{Physical Review B}, 91(1), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Automotive domain wall propagation in ferromagnetic rings

Richter, K., Mawass, M., Krone, A., Krüger, B., Weigand, M., Schütz, G., Stoll, H., Kläui, M.

In IEEE International Magnetics Conference (INTERMAG 2015), IEEE, Beijing, China, 2015 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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High resolution, high efficiency mulitlayer Fresnel zone plates for soft and hard X-rays

Sanli, U., Keskinbora, K., Gregorczyk, K., Leister, J., Teeny, N., Grévent, C., Knez, M., Schütz, G.

{Proceedings of SPIE}, 9592, SPIE, Bellingham, Washington, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Macroscopic drift current in the inverse Faraday effect

Hertel, R., Fähnle, M.

{Physical Review B}, 91(2), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Single-step 3D nanofabrication of kinoform optics via gray-scale focused ion beam lithography for efficient X-ray focusing

Keskinbora, K., Grévent, C., Hirscher, M., Weigand, M., Schütz, G.

{Advanced Optical Materials}, 3, pages: 792-800, WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Band structure engineering of two-dimensional magnonic vortex crystals

Behncke, C., Hänze, M., Adolff, C. F., Weigand, M., Meier, G.

{Physical Review B}, 91(22), American Physical Society, Woodbury, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Towards denoising XMCD movies of fast magnetization dynamics using extended Kalman filter

Kopp, M., Harmeling, S., Schütz, G., Schölkopf, B., Fähnle, M.

{Ultramicroscopy}, 148, pages: 115-122, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi

Krannich, S., Sidis, Y., Lamago, D., Heid, R., Mignot, J., von Löhneysen, H., Ivanov, A., Steffens, P., Keller, T., Wang, L., Goering, E., Weber, F.

{Nature Communications}, 6, Nature Publishing Group, London, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Transfer of angular momentum from the spin system to the lattice during ultrafast magnetization

Tsatsoulis, T.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2015 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Derivation of phenomenological expressions for transition matrix elements for electron-phonon scattering

Illg, C., Haag, M., Müller, B. Y., Czycholl, G., Fähnle, M.

2015 (misc)

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link (url) [BibTex]


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Quantum kinetic theory of ultrafast demagnetization by electron-phonon scattering

Briones Paz, J. Z.

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, 2015 (mastersthesis)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Perpendicular magnetisation from in-plane fields in nano-scaled antidot lattices

Gräfe, J., Haering, F., Tietze, T., Audehm, P., Weigand, M., Wiedwald, U., Ziemann, P., Gawronski, P., Schütz, G., Goering, E. J.

{Nanotechnology}, 26(22), IOP Pub., Bristol, UK, 2015 (article)

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DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Theory of ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser pulses

Fähnle, M., Illg, C., Haag, M., Teeny, N.

{Acta Physica Polonica A}, 127(2):170-175, Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, Warszawa, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Non-linear radial spinwave modes in thin magnetic disks

Helsen, M., Gangwar, Ajay, De Clercq, J., Vansteenkiste, A., Weigand, M., Back, C. H., Van Waeyenberge, B.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106(3), American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Hydrogen isotope separation in metal-organic frameworks: Kinetic or chemical affinity quantum-sieving?

Savchenko, I., Mavrandonakis, A., Heine, T., Oh, H., Teufel, J., Hirscher, M.

{Microporous and Mesoporous Materials}, 216, pages: 133-137, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

Ruoß, S., Stahl, C., Weigand, M., Schütz, G., Albrecht, J.

{Applied Physics Letters}, 106, American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The third dimension: Vortex core reversal by interaction with \textquotesingleflexure modes’

Noske, M., Stoll, H., Fähnle, M., Weigand, M., Dieterle, G., Förster, J., Gangwar, A., Slavin, A., Back, C. H., Schütz, G.

In IEEE International Magnetics Conference (INTERMAG 2015), IEEE, Beijing, China, 2015 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Preparation and characterisation of epitaxial Pt/Cu/FeMn/Co thin films on (100)-oriented MgO single crystals

Schmidt, M., Gräfe, J., Audehm, P., Phillipp, F., Schütz, G., Goering, E.

{Physica Status Solidi A}, 212(10):2114-2123, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Probing the magnetic moments of [MnIII6CrIII]3+ single-molecule magnets - A cross comparison of XMCD and spin-resolved electron spectroscopy

Helmstedt, A., Dohmeier, N., Müller, N., Gryzia, A., Brechling, A., Heinzmann, U., Hoeke, V., Krickemeyer, E., Glaser, T., Leicht, P., Fonin, M., Tietze, T., Joly, L., Kuepper, K.

{Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena}, 198, pages: 12-19, Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, 2015 (article)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Skyrmions at room temperature in magnetic multilayers

Moreau-Luchaire, C., Reyren, N., Moutafis, C., Sampaio, J., Van Horne, N., Vaz, C. A., Warnicke, P., Garcia, K., Weigand, M., Bouzehouane, K., Deranlot, C., George, J., Raabe, J., Cros, V., Fert, A.

In IEEE International Magnetics Conference (INTERMAG 2015), IEEE, Beijing, China, 2015 (inproceedings)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Nanopropellers and Their Actuation in Complex Viscoelastic Media

Schamel, D., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Miksch, C., Morozov, K. I., Leshansky, A. M., Fischer, P.

ACS Nano, 8(9):8794-8801, June 2014, Featured cover article. (article)

Abstract
Tissue and biological fluids are complex viscoelastic media with a nanoporous macromolecular structure. Here, we demonstrate that helical nanopropellers can be controllably steered through such a biological gel. The screw-propellers have a filament diameter of about 70 nm and are smaller than previously reported nanopropellers as well as any swimming microorganism. We show that the nanoscrews will move through high-viscosity solutions with comparable velocities to that of larger micropropellers, even though they are so small that Brownian forces suppress their actuation in pure water. When actuated in viscoelastic hyaluronan gels, the nanopropellers appear to have a significant advantage, as they are of the same size range as the gel’s mesh size. Whereas larger helices will show very low or negligible propulsion in hyaluronan solutions, the nanoscrews actually display significantly enhanced propulsion velocities that exceed the highest measured speeds in Newtonian fluids. The nanopropellers are not only promising for applications in the extracellular environment but small enough to be taken up by cells.

Featured cover article.

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Video - Helical Micro and Nanopropellers for Applications in Biological Fluidic Environments link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Convertor

Fischer, P., Mark, A.

May 2014 (patent)

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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3D nanofabrication on complex seed shapes using glancing angle deposition

Hyeon-Ho, J., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Reindl, T., Waizmann, U., Weis, J., Fischer, P.

In 2014 IEEE 27th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), pages: 437-440, January 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) fabrication techniques promise new device architectures and enable the integration of more components, but fabricating 3D nanostructures for device applications remains challenging. Recently, we have performed glancing angle deposition (GLAD) upon a nanoscale hexagonal seed array to create a variety of 3D nanoscale objects including multicomponent rods, helices, and zigzags [1]. Here, in an effort to generalize our technique, we present a step-by-step approach to grow 3D nanostructures on more complex nanoseed shapes and configurations than before. This approach allows us to create 3D nanostructures on nanoseeds regardless of seed sizes and shapes.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Circular polarization interferometry: circularly polarized modes of cholesteric liquid crystals

Sanchez-Castillo, A., Eslami, S., Giesselmann, F., Fischer, P.

OPTICS EXPRESS, 22(25):31227-31236, 2014 (article)

Abstract
We describe a novel polarization interferometer which permits the determination of the refractive indices for circularly-polarized light. It is based on a Jamin-Lebedeff interferometer, modified with waveplates, and permits us to experimentally determine the refractive indices n(L) and n(R) of the respectively left- and right-circularly polarized modes in a cholesteric liquid crystal. Whereas optical rotation measurements only determine the circular birefringence, i.e. the difference (n(L) - n(R)), the interferometer also permits the determination of their absolute values. We report refractive indices of a cholesteric liquid crystal in the region of selective (Bragg) reflection as a function of temperature. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Self-Propelling Nanomotors in the Presence of Strong Brownian Forces

Lee, T., Alarcon-Correa, M., Miksch, C., Hahn, K., Gibbs, J. G., Fischer, P.

NANO LETTERS, 14(5):2407-2412, 2014 (article)

Abstract
Motility in living systems is due to an array of complex molecular nanomotors that are essential for the function and survival of cells. These protein nanomotors operate not only despite of but also because of stochastic forces. Artificial means of realizing motility rely on local concentration or temperature gradients that are established across a particle, resulting in slip velocities at the particle surface and thus motion of the particle relative to the fluid. However, it remains unclear if these artificial motors can function at the smallest of scales, where Brownian motion dominates and no actively propelled living organisms can be found. Recently, the first reports have appeared suggesting that the swimming mechanisms of artificial structures may also apply to enzymes that are catalytically active. Here we report a scheme to realize artificial Janus nanoparticles (JNPs) with an overall size that is comparable to that of some enzymes similar to 30 nm. Our JNPs can catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen and thus actively move by self-electrophoresis. Geometric anisotropy of the Pt-Au Janus nanoparticles permits the simultaneous observation of their translational and rotational motion by dynamic light scattering. While their dynamics is strongly influenced by Brownian rotation, the artificial Janus nanomotors show bursts of linear ballistic motion resulting in enhanced diffusion.

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DOI [BibTex]


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Shape control in wafer-based aperiodic 3D nanostructures

Hyeon-Ho, J., Mark, A. G., Gibbs, J. G., Reindl, T., Waizmann, U., Weis, J., Fischer, P.

NANOTECHNOLOGY, 25(23), 2014, Cover article. (article)

Abstract
Controlled local fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures is important to explore and enhance the function of single nanodevices, but is experimentally challenging. We present a scheme based on e-beam lithography (EBL) written seeds, and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) grown structures to create nanoscale objects with defined shapes but in aperiodic arrangements. By using a continuous sacrificial corral surrounding the features of interest we grow isolated 3D nanostructures that have complex cross-sections and sidewall morphology that are surrounded by zones of clean substrate.

Cover article.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Active Microrheology of the Vitreous of the Eye applied to Nanorobot Propulsion

Qiu, T., Schamel, D., Mark, A. G., Fischer, P.

In 2014 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION (ICRA), pages: 3801-3806, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation ICRA, 2014, Best Automation Paper Award – Finalist. (inproceedings)

Abstract
Biomedical applications of micro or nanorobots require active movement through complex biological fluids. These are generally non-Newtonian (viscoelastic) fluids that are characterized by complicated networks of macromolecules that have size-dependent rheological properties. It has been suggested that an untethered microrobot could assist in retinal surgical procedures. To do this it must navigate the vitreous humor, a hydrated double network of collagen fibrils and high molecular-weight, polyanionic hyaluronan macromolecules. Here, we examine the characteristic size that potential robots must have to traverse vitreous relatively unhindered. We have constructed magnetic tweezers that provide a large gradient of up to 320 T/m to pull sub-micron paramagnetic beads through biological fluids. A novel two-step electrical discharge machining (EDM) approach is used to construct the tips of the magnetic tweezers with a resolution of 30 mu m and high aspect ratio of similar to 17:1 that restricts the magnetic field gradient to the plane of observation. We report measurements on porcine vitreous. In agreement with structural data and passive Brownian diffusion studies we find that the unhindered active propulsion through the eye calls for nanorobots with cross-sections of less than 500 nm.

Best Automation Paper Award – Finalist.

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[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Swimming by reciprocal motion at low Reynolds number

Qiu, T., Lee, T., Mark, A. G., Morozov, K. I., Muenster, R., Mierka, O., Turek, S., Leshansky, A. M., Fischer, P.

NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 5, 2014, Max Planck Press Release. (article)

Abstract
Biological microorganisms swim with flagella and cilia that execute nonreciprocal motions for low Reynolds number (Re) propulsion in viscous fluids. This symmetry requirement is a consequence of Purcell's scallop theorem, which complicates the actuation scheme needed by microswimmers. However, most biomedically important fluids are non-Newtonian where the scallop theorem no longer holds. It should therefore be possible to realize a microswimmer that moves with reciprocal periodic body-shape changes in non-Newtonian fluids. Here we report a symmetric `micro-scallop', a single-hinge microswimmer that can propel in shear thickening and shear thinning (non-Newtonian) fluids by reciprocal motion at low Re. Excellent agreement between our measurements and both numerical and analytical theoretical predictions indicates that the net propulsion is caused by modulation of the fluid viscosity upon varying the shear rate. This reciprocal swimming mechanism opens new possibilities in designing biomedical microdevices that can propel by a simple actuation scheme in non-Newtonian biological fluids.

Max Planck Press Release.

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Video - A Swimming Micro-Scallop Video - Winner of the Micro-robotic Design Challenge in Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics DOI [BibTex]

Video - A Swimming Micro-Scallop Video - Winner of the Micro-robotic Design Challenge in Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics DOI [BibTex]


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Nanohelices by shadow growth

Gibbs, J. G., Mark, A. G., Lee, T., Eslami, S., Schamel, D., Fischer, P.

NANOSCALE, 6(16):9457-9466, 2014 (article)

Abstract
The helix has remarkable qualities and is prevalent in many fields including mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. This shape, which is chiral by nature, is ubiquitous in biology with perhaps the most famous example being DNA. Other naturally occurring helices are common at the nanoscale in the form of protein secondary structures and in various macromolecules. Nanoscale helices exhibit a wide range of interesting mechanical, optical, and electrical properties which can be intentionally engineered into the structure by choosing the correct morphology and material. As technology advances, these fabrication parameters can be fine-tuned and matched to the application of interest. Herein, we focus on the fabrication and properties of nanohelices grown by a dynamic shadowing growth method combined with fast wafer-scale substrate patterning which has a number of distinct advantages. We review the fabrication methodology and provide several examples that illustrate the generality and utility of nanohelices shadow-grown on nanopatterns.

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Video - Fabrication of Designer Nanostructures DOI [BibTex]


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Chiral Nanomagnets

Eslami, S., Gibbs, J. G., Rechkemmer, Y., van Slageren, J., Alarcon-Correa, M., Lee, T., Mark, A. G., Rikken, G. L. J. A., Fischer, P.

ACS PHOTONICS, 1(11):1231-1236, 2014 (article)

Abstract
We report on the enhanced optical properties of chiral magnetic nanohelices with critical dimensions comparable to the ferromagnetic domain size. They are shown to be ferromagnetic at room temperature, have defined chirality, and exhibit large optical activity in the visible as verified by electron microscopy, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, natural circular dichroism (NCD), and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements. The structures exhibit magneto-chiral dichroism (MChD), which directly demonstrates coupling between their structural chirality and magnetism. A chiral nickel (Ni) film consisting of an array of nanohelices similar to 100 nm in length exhibits an MChD anisotropy factor g(MChD) approximate to 10(-4) T-1 at room temperature in a saturation field of similar to 0.2 T, permitting polarization-independent control of the film's absorption properties through magnetic field modulation. This is also the first report of MChD in a material with structural chirality on the order of the wavelength of light, and therefore the Ni nanohelix array is a metamaterial with magnetochiral properties that can be tailored through a dynamic deposition process.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]