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2003


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A Representation of Complex Movement Sequences Based on Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Correspondence for Imitation Learning in Robotics

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Franz, MO., Giese, M.

6, pages: 74, (Editors: H.H. Bülthoff, K.R. Gegenfurtner, H.A. Mallot, R. Ulrich, F.A. Wichmann), 6. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2003 (poster)

Abstract
Imitation learning of complex movements has become a popular topic in neuroscience, as well as in robotics. A number of conceptual as well as practical problems are still unsolved. One example is the determination of the aspects of movements which are relevant for imitation. Problems concerning the movement representation are twofold: (1) The movement characteristics of observed movements have to be transferred from the perceptual level to the level of generated actions. (2) Continuous spaces of movements with variable styles have to be approximated based on a limited number of learned example sequences. Therefore, one has to use representation with a high generalisation capability. We present methods for the representation of complex movement sequences that addresses these questions in the context of the imitation learning of writing movements using a robot arm with human-like geometry. For the transfer of complex movements from perception to action we exploit a learning-based method that represents complex action sequences by linear combination of prototypical examples (Ilg and Giese, BMCV 2002). The method of hierarchical spatio-temporal morphable models (HSTMM) decomposes action sequences automatically into movement primitives. These primitives are modeled by linear combinations of a small number of learned example trajectories. The learned spatio-temporal models are suitable for the analysis and synthesis of long action sequences, which consist of movement primitives with varying style parameters. The proposed method is illustrated by imitation learning of complex writing movements. Human trajectories were recorded using a commercial motion capture system (VICON). In the rst step the recorded writing sequences are decomposed into movement primitives. These movement primitives can be analyzed and changed in style by de ning linear combinations of prototypes with di erent linear weight combinations. Our system can imitate writing movements of di erent actors, synthesize new writing styles and can even exaggerate the writing movements of individual actors. Words and writing movements of the robot look very natural, and closely match the natural styles. These preliminary results makes the proposed method promising for further applications in learning-based robotics. In this poster we focus on the acquisition of the movement representation (identi cation and segmentation of movement primitives, generation of new writing styles by spatio-temporal morphing). The transfer of the generated writing movements to the robot considering the given kinematic and dynamic constraints is discussed in Bakir et al (this volume).

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PDF Web [BibTex]

2003


PDF Web [BibTex]


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Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models for Representation of complex movements for Imitation Learning

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Franz, MO., Giese, M.

In 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, (2):453-458, (Editors: Nunes, U., A. de Almeida, A. Bejczy, K. Kosuge and J.A.T. Machado), 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, January 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Variable and Feature Selection.

Guyon, I., Elisseeff, A.

Journal of Machine Learning, 3, pages: 1157-1182, 2003 (article)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Feature Selection for Support Vector Machines by Means of Genetic Algorithms

Fröhlich, H., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, pages: 142-148, 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, 2003 (inproceedings)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Propagation of Uncertainty in Bayesian Kernel Models - Application to Multiple-Step Ahead Forecasting

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Girard, A., Larsen, J., Rasmussen, CE.

In IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2, pages: 701-704, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The object of Bayesian modelling is the predictive distribution, which in a forecasting scenario enables improved estimates of forecasted values and their uncertainties. In this paper we focus on reliably estimating the predictive mean and variance of forecasted values using Bayesian kernel based models such as the Gaussian Process and the Relevance Vector Machine. We derive novel analytic expressions for the predictive mean and variance for Gaussian kernel shapes under the assumption of a Gaussian input distribution in the static case, and of a recursive Gaussian predictive density in iterative forecasting. The capability of the method is demonstrated for forecasting of time-series and compared to approximate methods.

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PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Clustering of Images using their Joint Segmentation

Seldin, Y., Starik, S., Werman, M.

In The 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV 2003), pages: 1-24, 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV), 2003 (inproceedings)

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PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Note on Parameter Tuning for On-Line Shifting Algorithms

Bousquet, O.

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, 2003 (techreport)

Abstract
In this short note, building on ideas of M. Herbster [2] we propose a method for automatically tuning the parameter of the FIXED-SHARE algorithm proposed by Herbster and Warmuth [3] in the context of on-line learning with shifting experts. We show that this can be done with a memory requirement of $O(nT)$ and that the additional loss incurred by the tuning is the same as the loss incurred for estimating the parameter of a Bernoulli random variable.

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PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Kernel Methods and Their Applications to Signal Processing

Bousquet, O., Perez-Cruz, F.

In Proceedings. (ICASSP ‘03), Special Session on Kernel Methods, pages: 860 , ICASSP, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently introduced in Machine Learning, the notion of kernels has drawn a lot of interest as it allows to obtain non-linear algorithms from linear ones in a simple and elegant manner. This, in conjunction with the introduction of new linear classification methods such as the Support Vector Machines has produced significant progress. The successes of such algorithms is now spreading as they are applied to more and more domains. Many Signal Processing problems, by their non-linear and high-dimensional nature may benefit from such techniques. We give an overview of kernel methods and their recent applications.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Predictive control with Gaussian process models

Kocijan, J., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE., Likar, B.

In Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon 2003: Computer as a Tool, pages: 352-356, (Editors: Zajc, B. and M. Tkal), Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon: Computer as a Tool, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper describes model-based predictive control based on Gaussian processes.Gaussian process models provide a probabilistic non-parametric modelling approach for black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems. It offers more insight in variance of obtained model response, as well as fewer parameters to determine than other models. The Gaussian processes can highlight areas of the input space where prediction quality is poor, due to the lack of data or its complexity, by indicating the higher variance around the predicted mean. This property is used in predictive control, where optimisation of control signal takes the variance information into account. The predictive control principle is demonstrated on a simulated example of nonlinear system.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Extension of the nu-SVM range for classification

Perez-Cruz, F., Weston, J., Herrmann, D., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Learning Theory: Methods, Models and Applications, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Sciences, Vol. 190, 190, pages: 179-196, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Sciences, (Editors: J Suykens and G Horvath and S Basu and C Micchelli and J Vandewalle), IOS Press, Amsterdam, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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m-Alternative Forced Choice—Improving the Efficiency of the Method of Constant Stimuli

Jäkel, F.

Biologische Kybernetik, Graduate School for Neural and Behavioural Sciences, Tübingen, 2003 (diplomathesis)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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New Approaches to Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O.

Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 55(2):371-389, 2003 (article)

Abstract
We present new tools from probability theory that can be applied to the analysis of learning algorithms. These tools allow to derive new bounds on the generalization performance of learning algorithms and to propose alternative measures of the complexity of the learning task, which in turn can be used to derive new learning algorithms.

ei

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Distance-based classification with Lipschitz functions

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O.

In Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, pages: 314-328, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. and M.K. Warmuth), Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to develop a framework for large margin classification in metric spaces. We want to find a generalization of linear decision functions for metric spaces and define a corresponding notion of margin such that the decision function separates the training points with a large margin. It will turn out that using Lipschitz functions as decision functions, the inverse of the Lipschitz constant can be interpreted as the size of a margin. In order to construct a clean mathematical setup we isometrically embed the given metric space into a Banach space and the space of Lipschitz functions into its dual space. Our approach leads to a general large margin algorithm for classification in metric spaces. To analyze this algorithm, we first prove a representer theorem. It states that there exists a solution which can be expressed as linear combination of distances to sets of training points. Then we analyze the Rademacher complexity of some Lipschitz function classes. The generality of the Lipschitz approach can be seen from the fact that several well-known algorithms are special cases of the Lipschitz algorithm, among them the support vector machine, the linear programming machine, and the 1-nearest neighbor classifier.

ei

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B.

In Recent Advances and Trends in Nonparametric Statistics , pages: 3-17, (Editors: MG Akritas and DN Politis), Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning and Kernel Methods in Bioinformatics

Schölkopf, B., Guyon, I., Weston, J.

In Artificial Intelligence and Heuristic Methods in Bioinformatics, 183, pages: 1-21, 3, (Editors: P Frasconi und R Shamir), IOS Press, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Interactive Images

Toyama, K., Schölkopf, B.

(MSR-TR-2003-64), Microsoft Research, Cambridge, UK, 2003 (techreport)

Abstract
Interactive Images are a natural extension of three recent developments: digital photography, interactive web pages, and browsable video. An interactive image is a multi-dimensional image, displayed two dimensions at a time (like a standard digital image), but with which a user can interact to browse through the other dimensions. One might consider a standard video sequence viewed with a video player as a simple interactive image with time as the third dimension. Interactive images are a generalization of this idea, in which the third (and greater) dimensions may be focus, exposure, white balance, saturation, and other parameters. Interaction is handled via a variety of modes including those we call ordinal, pixel-indexed, cumulative, and comprehensive. Through exploration of three novel forms of interactive images based on color, exposure, and focus, we will demonstrate the compelling nature of interactive images.

ei

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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A Short Introduction to Learning with Kernels

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Proceedings of the Machine Learning Summer School, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 2600, pages: 41-64, LNAI 2600, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian Kernel Methods

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advanced Lectures on Machine Learning, Machine Learning Summer School 2002, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 2600, LNAI 2600, pages: 65-117, 0, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Stability of ensembles of kernel machines

Elisseeff, A., Pontil, M.

In 190, pages: 111-124, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Science, (Editors: Suykens, J., G. Horvath, S. Basu, C. Micchelli and J. Vandewalle), IOS press, Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

ei

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Models of contrast transfer as a function of presentation time and spatial frequency.

Wichmann, F.

2003 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast transduction is essential for understanding spatial vision. Using standard 2AFC contrast discrimination experiments conducted using a carefully calibrated display we previously showed that the shape of the threshold versus (pedestal) contrast (TvC) curve changes with presentation time and the performance level defined as threshold (Wichmann, 1999; Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Additional experiments looked at the change of the TvC curve with spatial frequency (Bird, Henning & Wichmann, 2002), and at how to constrain the parameters of models of contrast processing (Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results both across spatial frequency and presentation time. An extensive model-selection exploration was performed using Bayesian confidence regions for the fitted parameters as well as cross-validation methods. Bird, C.M., G.B. Henning and F.A. Wichmann (2002). Contrast discrimination with sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequency. Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19, 1267-1273. Wichmann, F.A. (1999). Some aspects of modelling human spatial vision: contrast discrimination. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Oxford. Wichmann, F.A. & Henning, G.B. (1999). Implications of the Pedestal Effect for Models of Contrast-Processing and Gain-Control. OSA Annual Meeting Program, 62. Wichmann, F.A. (2002). Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 2, 7a.

ei

[BibTex]

1998


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SVMs — a practical consequence of learning theory

Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Intelligent Systems and their Applications, 13(4):18-21, July 1998 (article)

Abstract
My first exposure to Support Vector Machines came this spring when heard Sue Dumais present impressive results on text categorization using this analysis technique. This issue's collection of essays should help familiarize our readers with this interesting new racehorse in the Machine Learning stable. Bernhard Scholkopf, in an introductory overview, points out that a particular advantage of SVMs over other learning algorithms is that it can be analyzed theoretically using concepts from computational learning theory, and at the same time can achieve good performance when applied to real problems. Examples of these real-world applications are provided by Sue Dumais, who describes the aforementioned text-categorization problem, yielding the best results to date on the Reuters collection, and Edgar Osuna, who presents strong results on application to face detection. Our fourth author, John Platt, gives us a practical guide and a new technique for implementing the algorithm efficiently.

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PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

1998


PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Prior knowledge in support vector kernels

Schölkopf, B., Simard, P., Smola, A., Vapnik, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10, pages: 640-646 , (Editors: M Jordan and M Kearns and S Solla ), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Eleventh Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing (NIPS), June 1998 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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From regularization operators to support vector kernels

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10, pages: 343-349, (Editors: M Jordan and M Kearns and S Solla), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 11th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing (NIPS), June 1998 (inproceedings)

ei

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Learning view graphs for robot navigation

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H.

Autonomous Robots, 5(1):111-125, March 1998 (article)

Abstract
We present a purely vision-based scheme for learning a topological representation of an open environment. The system represents selected places by local views of the surrounding scene, and finds traversable paths between them. The set of recorded views and their connections are combined into a graph model of the environment. To navigate between views connected in the graph, we employ a homing strategy inspired by findings of insect ethology. In robot experiments, we demonstrate that complex visual exploration and navigation tasks can thus be performed without using metric information.

ei

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]